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I know maturity level is more important than age, but I also know any thing taken to an extreme is ridiculous. I have been in touch with an international marketing firm and had been invited in for a second interview. The person interviewing me looked awfully young and was dressed in a very stereotypical suit. At one point he asked me my age (which, by the way, I heard is illegal?) and I answered. I asked him the question back and he said 19. He seemed like a typical 19 year old, for example he talked about how winter is his favorite season as he can go snowboarding then. Now, I'm not saying there's anything wrong about being 19 or snowboarding, but I'm not sure I would be comfortable having someone this young in a management position.

He had some young tendencies that most people his age have. It has been my experience that employers like to hear would google search something to find how to do it, but when I told him this he didn't like it and I remember back in grade school it was consider cheating to "google search the answer" (though obviously in the work place that's what you do).

I don't know how to take it that the second round interview was conducted by a 19 year old kid. Also there was some other questionable circumstances, like how we ended up going to Starbucks for the interview as apparently the office was in the middle of moving.

closed as unclear what you're asking by Erik, Masked Man, gnat, alroc, Chris E Apr 2 '17 at 22:27

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  • Most likely he is like the son of the boss. – SmallChess Apr 1 '17 at 8:46
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    What is the actual situation you need help with? This sounds like a rant. – Erik Apr 1 '17 at 8:58
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    Asking someone's age in an interview is a HUGELY improper thing. While federal law only considers people over 40 to be a protected class, state and local laws vary, and many provide additional protections. – heathenJesus Apr 1 '17 at 8:59
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    It looks like you have already made up your mind. It is not clear what you want us to help with. – Masked Man Apr 1 '17 at 11:25
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    Although looking it up in Google is a good start, in some cases, I have been in situations in which nobody else was likely to know the answer, such as questions about a compiler I had developed. I have met, but would not want to hire, people whose ideas for getting an answer stop, rather than merely starting, at Google and/or StackOverflow. He may have been trying to find out if you could think beyond hoping somebody else already has the answer. – Patricia Shanahan Apr 1 '17 at 12:42
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Should you consider age of interviewer?

I'm not sure I would be comfortable having someone this young in a management position.

I don't now how to take it that the second round interview was conducted by a 19 year old kid.

You are the candidate. You can consider any factor you choose when deciding if you want to join this company or not.

You seem to have already concluded that this interviewer fits into a stereotypical negative category you hold concerning younger people.

You get to decide if you want to work for a company that has this person as a manager. Alternatively, you might conclude that this individual happens to be a poor interviewer, and isn't reflective of the company as a whole.

This might be a good time to reflect on your personal feelings about age and the workplace. As we get older, the chances of encountering folks younger than us gets higher. And at some point most of us will eventually work for someone younger. If that's going to be a big problem, our employment opportunities will be significantly diminished.

But it's your decision. You can choose to reject this company solely on the basis of the age of this interviewer. Or not.

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If you don't think he's suitable management material, don't hire him as a manager. But since he's in the process of perhaps hiring you, not the other way around. It's a moot point, and his age is immaterial.

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Ignore the age of the interviewer.

Several years ago my sons university had students participate in the interview process for a dean. That's right students participated in interviews for somebody would would be the boss of the instructors and professors.

Not all interviewers are management. I have been in ones where I was there because I did a similar job; other times I was there because they would be on my team; another time I was the only appropriate person who could get to the interview site in the next 10 minutes.

I have conducted interviews in restaurants, and I was once interviewed at a pancake restaurant over breakfast. Location doesn't matter.

Now, I'm not saying there's anything wrong about being 19 or snowboarding, but I'm not sure I would be comfortable having someone this young in a management position.

If you told him this, and they do have mangers that young, you probably sealed your fate.

I remember back in grade school it was consider cheating to "google search the answer" (though obviously in the work place that's what you do).

In some workplaces that may make you a youngster. You were in grade school when google was ubiquitous enough so the phrase "it is cheating to use google" was a thing.

I don't know how to take it that the second round interview was conducted by a 19 year old kid.

There is no rule that a second round in done by X. I have seen it done by HR, by management, by technical people; and sometimes there was only one round.

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