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I've received an offer of employment where the offered salary was £5k less than the advertised 'up to' amount.

I do like the company and the upper bound of the 'up to' amount would have a been a dream but unlikely given similar jobs at that level.

The actual offer is little of the low side for the job but not too far off what I would accept. I feel like if I mention the original salary listing I may lose the offer all together is it worth it?

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    Is £5k really the difference between "a dream" and the offer being a "little of the low side for the job"?
    – pay
    Apr 3, 2017 at 18:51
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    "Up to X" is every number from 0 to X.
    – kemis
    Apr 4, 2017 at 1:51
  • "the upper bound of the 'up to' amount would have a been a dream but unlikely given similar jobs at that level." - Are you a stellar performer to deserve that rate? Basically, you should achieve a salary which you deserve. Apr 4, 2017 at 3:29
  • This question is off-topic here, please check the help center and tour to get a sense of what kind of questions we can and can't answer. Only you can decide whether you want to accept a job offer or not.
    – Lilienthal
    Apr 4, 2017 at 7:55
  • "I feel like if I mention the original salary listing I may lose the offer" - why? They published "up to X", then you bringing that up is natural. Be sure to know what your minimum is (e.g. will you accept if they adjust the offer to X-4k?)
    – Brandin
    Apr 4, 2017 at 11:14

2 Answers 2

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Offering £5k less than an 'up to x amount' is valid - they are saying that X is as high as they'll go, but they could go lower. They went lower.

Now you have to decide if you want to counter offer or take it as is.

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Okay, so the 'ceiling' is there so that you know where employees in that position will max out at. Here in the U.S., most salaried positions have a salary 'range', and candidates are usually offered a salary in that range depending on where there experience stands (lesser experience is offered closer to the lower end, etc).

Rarely is a candidate offered the maximum of the salary range for a position, as there is no room for them to be compensated more (i.e., no raises after that, it is the max). Offering you a bit less at least allows the benefit of merit raises until you max out, or decide to move on.

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