7

I currently work 3 days a week and I like that part of my job. I'm interviewing with another company soon and I'm wondering if it's better to inquire about the possibility of working 3 or 4 days a week during the interview or after (if) I get an offer. Note that this is not a deal-breaker for me - I wouldn't have applied otherwise.

  • if I mention it during the interview, that might give them a bad impression, lowering my chances of getting an offer
  • if I mention it later, it might be too late somehow

Which approach is safer? Or am I overthinking it and it's fine either way?

  • If it is not a deal breaker for you and you are sure about it, then may be you should just ask after the offer. Otherwise it may be a deal breaker for them and you may totally lose an opportunity. I do not think by asking about it later you are wasting anyone's time. You tried and the worst case scenario is working full time. (Which is best case scenario for lots!) – PagMax Apr 5 '17 at 11:58
7

if I mention it during the interview, that might give them a bad impression, lowering my chances of getting an offer

Then so be it. If they don't consider you as a candidate, then that's what happens.

When should I mention that I'm interested in working part-time?

As early as possible

When you apply, mention that you ideally would be looking for a 3/4/whatever day job. If they don't consider you, then you're not a good fit for the company.

...but be sure to accurately state your requirements

But if you are open to full time, then say that! "3 days a week would be ideal, but I'm open to negotiating". Or similar. It's also useful to say how important it is. "This is a very high priority for me" or "this would be nice, but I'm open to negotiating". They may come back to you and say "Sorry, we aren't willing to negotiate in this area at all." and then you need to decide if that's a deal-breaker or not.

No matter what, be honest!

Don't say nothing and then go through the process (spending their time and yours) and then at the very end say "oh, by the way, part time?". You need to be open about your requirements so that both of you can decide if this is going to work. If you're not open from the beginning, it's just going to be a waste of everyone's time.

4

I'm wondering if it's better to inquire about the possibility of working 3 or 4 days a week during the interview or after (if) I get an offer.

Neither. You should know if a job is full time or part time before you apply.

If you want a part-time position, don't apply for a full-time job.

If you were applying for a full-time job and you asked at any point before you were hired if you could work part-time, I would drop you as a candidate. I would conclude that you wouldn't be happy in the job I was offering. If I wanted a part-timer, I would mention that in the job ad. In my experience as a hiring manager, that's never been a negotiable feature of a job.

As a hiring manger for many years, I always had to create a req for the new position. And I always had to declare if the position was full-time/part-time. It would be odd to go back and change the req ("You know what, I don't really need a full-timer for this position after all"). Unless the business need had somehow changed, that's not something I would do.

If you really want a part-time job, apply for jobs listed as part-time.

  • 3
    Most software development jobs don't explicitly state whether they are full-time or part-time and are implicitly full-time. But some are flexible about it. Which is how I'm working 3 days a week now. – Ilakoni Apr 4 '17 at 21:06
  • During the interview, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's always the best way. – Ilakoni Apr 5 '17 at 6:46
  • 1
    @JoeStrazzere - I don't fully agree with you. There are certain occupations (e.g. software developers) where productivity is not linearly related to the time spent at the office (e.g. you shouldn't measure the productivity of the developer in lines of code per hour or such). Hence, a person coming 3 days a week to the office may have much brighter and broader ideas (and thus be of more added value to the company) than someone who spends 5 days a week with low motivation (because they had no choice but to work 5 days a week). – Mike Apr 5 '17 at 8:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.