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I am leaving a company within 6 months of joining for several reasons but main being they highly misrepresented my role/work in the company and all the work they have is far below my level. Perhaps they did not plan it and their business did not grow as fast as they wanted. However, they are very unapologetic about it. (Still paying me very high salary though!)

I knew this is hurting their business and my career. So I decided to resign gracefully and help us both. I am required to give one month notice and I did that based on timing for my next job. I clearly mentioned my preferred last date in my resignation email which was close to a month.

Now this company has asked me leave in 2 weeks instead of 4. I would have accepted even that if they would have requested me that nicely. What I am mad about is that they are trying to frame it as if I requested an earlier date and they are being kind enough to grant me that. (From an out of context conversation with my manager where I just verbally mentioned that "I just thought it is better to leave sooner than later"). I tried to discuss this with my HR and my manager (both face-to-face and on email) on how can they do this but the discussion is not going anywhere and already getting uncomfortable for me to handle. They are still insisting that it is as per my verbal request (which I never made.)

I have always left my employers (3 total till now) in a very good note . But with this company, this incident plus the initial misleading they did during my job interview, is tempting me to not go quietly. I have three options from my point of view.

  1. Do nothing and accept their last date. (I actually do not mind 2 weeks break but I am more mad about the attitude!)

  2. Demand and fight for the last date only after serving full 1 month. (Do not want to do this because even if I win this fight, it will be very uncomfortable 2 weeks in office.)

  3. After I move out completely, send a note to my manager's manager (who is in a different continent altogether and I only met him once for few minutes) and list out all these events in detail. I am just not sure that once I am out, is it worth to fight this battle or not. I am not expecting any financial compensation for this. I just want to tell that they have handled this very unprofessionally.
    I also know once I send that email full of complaints after I leave, I do not know where it will be forwarded and there is a risk to my own professional reputation.

How do you think I should handle this situation?

closed as off-topic by Erik, JasonJ, gnat, Retired Codger, Chris E Apr 7 '17 at 18:17

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  • 1
    Situations like this are why you never give more notice than you have to. If you've only been there six months and you've been working far below your level, it's really unlikely that you needed two weeks to transition everything. – David K Apr 6 '17 at 18:03
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    Why do you want to stay an extra two weeks in a role you dislike? If it's a money issue, can you ask to start early at the new job? – user812786 Apr 6 '17 at 18:29
  • @whrrgarbl, I actually do not want to stay extra. I am prepared for setback on money and I can use that break for lot of positive things. I am only mad that they are lying about it as if I am requesting it (probably so that I do not demand 2 weeks pay) and they did from the beginning at different stages including my interview. – PagMax Apr 7 '17 at 3:39
  • @DavidK, I agree. I do not need even 2 weeks to really transition. I only wish they had requested me straight instead of manipulating the situation. That is the only reason I am posting the query here. – PagMax Apr 7 '17 at 3:40
  • What are you hoping to accomplish? We need to know your goal to give you a good answer. – Erik Apr 7 '17 at 11:31
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I have three options from my point of view.

Do nothing and accept their last date. (I actually do not mind 2 weeks break but I am more mad about the attitude!)

That is what I would suggest.

Demand and fight for the last date only after serving full 1 month. (Do not want to do this because even if I win this fight, it will be very uncomfortable 2 weeks in office.)

Depending on your locale, this is very unlikely to succeed.

In the US, in at-will states, you don't need to be granted any particular resignation period and could be walked out of the building immediately. And you certainly have no leverage to "demand" anything.

In your locale, other laws may apply.

After I move out completely, send a note to my manager's manager (who is in a different continent altogether and I only met him once for few minutes) and list out all these events in detail. I am just not sure that once I am out, is it worth to fight this battle or not. I am not expecting any financial compensation for this. I just want to tell that they have handled this very unprofessionally. I also know once I send that email full of complaints after I leave, I do not know where it will be forwarded and there is a risk to my own professional reputation.

This seems foolish.

You don't know this manager's manager. It's unlikely a disgruntled former employee's rant note from a different continent would be effective.

It might make you feel better briefly, but it would only serve to diminish your personal and professional reputation.

How do you think I should handle this situation?

Serve out the two weeks in a professional manner, move on, and don't look back.

  • Th other option is ask for payment in lieu of notice for the full 4 weeks plus any owed leave – Neuromancer Apr 6 '17 at 22:42
  • This is an American company but not in US. I am not sure about local law here but I did not know that in US they can ask to leave immediately. Interesting point. – PagMax Apr 7 '17 at 3:24
  • @Neuromancer, Yes I could do that but that is what my point is. Just to avoid paying me 4 weeks of notice period, they are trying to portray that it was my request to leave early. (They are very close to outright lying) – PagMax Apr 7 '17 at 3:26
  • @Joe, I agree with all your points and I do agree last one may only look like rant from disgruntled employee. Although not sure about the 'foolish' part. My only hope from that was to save someone else this experience in future (Although I can see several ways it can fire back on me). And now seeing that pretty much everyone's suggestion is to forget about it and move on, I think I will do exactly that. – PagMax Apr 7 '17 at 3:34
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If I were you, I would write a very strongly worded email but leave the recipient address blank. I would list out each grievance in detail, how I felt about it, and what I thought could be done differently.

I would save that email in Drafts over night.

Then I'd delete it without sending.

Let it go.

Life is way to short to take this sort of thing personally. You're getting an unexpected 2 week break that you said you don't mind, and this company will soon be behind you.

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    +1 This gets the satisfaction of writing the complaint, without doing any harm. – Patricia Shanahan Apr 6 '17 at 18:28
  • Thanks @Dan. Yes break or financial implication is not my concern. It is just that how they pretty much lied from beginning to end. I can move on as everyone is suggesting. I just thought that if I notify someone, it can help a future employee. (or may be I am just being too optimistic) – PagMax Apr 7 '17 at 3:28
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Will they be paying you for the whole month or only 15 days. In case they are paying you for the whole month or if you have sufficient resources to carry on with life for 15 days, I'd suggest you to go with option 1. After all you have said that it's more about handling your own feelings.

It may just be that due to some administrative reasons, they might be doing this. To forgive and forget such inconveniences, is my humble advice.

  • They will be of course paying me for 15 days and that is what they want and that is why there are manipulating it. I do agree with you and others that this situation forgive and forget is the right thing to do. – PagMax Apr 7 '17 at 3:42

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