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Ive been working in retail for over 10 years. Great record, hard worker etc..was time to move on so I applied for another job using 1st job as reference..was given the job and have started to work at the new place. While working my notice period on my first job, I made a mistake that have got me dismissed for gross misconduct. So now only working new job..the 2nd one

How should I go about the situation? Application, interview were all based on when I was working at 1st job. Now that I have been dismissed from 1st job..what do I do about 2nd job? Do I let them know or wait and see?

Please advise

closed as unclear what you're asking by gnat, Masked Man, Michael Grubey, Jim G., The Wandering Dev Manager Apr 16 '17 at 1:51

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    Why would you let them know? You got the job??? – SmallChess Apr 15 '17 at 10:21
  • How did you get fired from the 1st job while working notice period of the 2nd job? Are you doing multiple jobs? – Masked Man Apr 15 '17 at 11:41
  • the 1st job ive done for 10 years, while I was working there ive been applying for other jobs. and got myself an interview and was offered the job, so now would be working 2 jobs. the 1st job which ive worked for 10 years I gave my notice so that I would only have to work the 2nd new job. then the mistake happened which left me getting dismissed instead of finishing off my notice period. now I am only working my 2nd job, the new one – A.mystery Apr 15 '17 at 11:56
  • "so that I would only have to work the 2nd new job" Mission accomplished. You're now at the new job, forget about the old one. – PeteCon Apr 15 '17 at 15:41
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    Best advice I was ever given: "Never let a good opportunity to shut up pass you by." – Wesley Long Apr 15 '17 at 20:00
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You're no longer in your old job, best not to say anything that could jeapordise your position in the only job you have unless it's absolutely necessary. In this case I would just keep quiet.

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    Not sure why this was downvoted: once you're in the new job, the old job ceases to be relevant. – jpatokal Apr 15 '17 at 10:39
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    @jpatokal agree. If you've started new job and everything is signed and agreed. Old job is old news. – user66194 Apr 15 '17 at 12:15
  • The only thing that concerns me is that..ive recieved my contract which states i have the job. Theres a section that says theres a 12 week probationary period and employment is conditional upon recieving satisfactory references. – A.mystery Apr 15 '17 at 13:51
  • If you used your first job as a reference you risk the chance they will state why you were dismissed. Of course a single even over 10 years must be taken into context. Unless it's happened before, and you plan to work on the reasons the mistake happened, not much you can do – Donald Apr 16 '17 at 5:07
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In most cases you are not legally compelled to inform your new employer of anything (some regulated industries and various country laws vary). This isn't the legal exchange, so I assume you're focused on the ethics.

Ethically, I don't see a reason you need to inform the new company. You (presumably) didn't do anything illegal or that would jeopardize your future employment, so it's really none of their business. Hopefully you've learned from a mistake and will actually be a better employee than you would have.

One thing doesn't make sense... you said you were a good employee with the old company for 10 years, and then they fired you for "gross misconduct" for one mistake. You didn't give details, so maybe you're not being completely up-front in your depiction and it was a really bad offense. Often "senioritis" kicks in during the last couple weeks of a job and good people make bad decisions.

Alternately, are you thinking they just decided they didn't want to wait out the 2-week notice period? There may be legal and moral implications of them essentially firing you for leaving. Laws vary, but if if they did do that it seems like a pretty bad way to treat a long-time employee.

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