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I have requested a HR meeting to highlight my personal and professional issues I have that are of concern to me (due to my base of work being moved temporarily to cover sickness).

I was initially told I would be moved for 4 weeks, this then changed and 12 weeks later I remain, despite the individual returning to work. Management have offered poor communication and will not confirm when I can return to my own base. They have also without discussion or consultation with myself have removed my caseload and changed my team.

Due to this I asked for HR meeting however they have responded saying it will be management meeting and HR are not required to be there.

Can they refuse my request for a meeting and pass the obligations onto mangement?

closed as off-topic by Masked Man, Chris E, Mister Positive, JasonJ, paparazzo Apr 19 '17 at 18:20

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  • Yes, they can. If you don't agree with it, you'll need to get some outside help or even higher management. That's the business prerogative I'm afraid. – Draken Apr 19 '17 at 17:11
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    Yes, and remember HR is NOT your friend! – Richard U Apr 19 '17 at 17:23
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    For the love of all things sacred, don't ever air your issues with HR unless they involved mistreatment by your supervisor (like sexual harassment) or something the handbook says "this is something you should bring to HR". HR's job is to protect the company and represent the company, period. Don't ever make the mistake of believing HR is there to mediate. They aren't. They are there to support management. The only exceptions are if there are crimes being committed and even then only sometimes. – Chris E Apr 19 '17 at 17:51
  • I am in unite union and I have requested their assistance and attendance at the meeting to support me. Thanks for all comments. – Joanne Apr 19 '17 at 17:58
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    @Joanne - You should probably go to your union rep and lay out everything long before the meeting. – Wesley Long Apr 19 '17 at 18:15
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Yes they can. You have no "right" to a meeting with anybody. Obviously, it's up to you to act upon the information that they don't want to meet with you. You could involve higher management, maybe a union representative or look for another job. But there is no way to "force" a meeting with HR.

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I was initially told I would be moved for 4 weeks, this then changed and 12 weeks later I remain, despite the individual returning to work

Is it in writing?

They have also without discussion or consultation with myself have removed my caseload and changed my team.

Managers don't tend to ask employees whether or not they want off a project. How many times have I gone to my project management page and seen someone with my old project on their dashboard? Lots and lots and ... you get the idea.

Can they refuse my request for a meeting and pass the obligations onto mangement?

Yes. You did indicate that "management" (a very ambiguous designation) had bad communication. Writing, writing, writing. Every email, every time. Keep those together and bring them to the managerial meeting. Escalate if there is no movement after the meeting. It doesn't seem like you've had a management meeting as of yet? To me, this is the normal course of escalation: tell the manager, meet with the manager, go up from there.

  • Nothing in writing however plenty of witnesses, however goal posts of my return to my base constantly changing. – Joanne Apr 19 '17 at 18:00
  • @Joanne - Your "Witnesses" are working for the company, correct? Don't assume you have their loyalty. – Wesley Long Apr 19 '17 at 18:16
  • Along with @WesleyLong I will say: Those witnesses have jobs they don't want to lose, either. Also, in any court setting or even in a higher-management setting word-of-mouth is very poor evidence. Always in writing, starting Now – SliderBlackrose Apr 19 '17 at 18:26

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