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I have recently joined a renowned firm as a consultant. I had high expectations and the salary was also good. But from the first day itself I was treated differently. After few days I became friend of the full time employee here and he told me that there was strict instruction to him to keep away from consultants, being in the same team I felt it very ridiculous. Since last month I facing serious offending behaviour from my senior too. I have totally lost interest in office and my motivation level is very low now, I cannot concentrate in office, what should I do?

I have some offers in hand but there is a notice period of two months of my current employers' contract. I am not sure I can survive in this situation for next two months, what to do?

closed as off-topic by Philip Kendall, gnat, Rory Alsop, Thalantas, Mister Positive Apr 20 '17 at 10:46

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    Always remember, it takes very small man to be a bully. – MrE Apr 20 '17 at 4:10
  • Just to clarify, you are feeling mistreated by both your firm (your senior?) and your client (stay away from consultants, etc.)? I would almost agree with Kilisi's answer below. – Teacher KSHuang Apr 20 '17 at 9:32
  • @TeacherKSHuang I am mistreated by my client, I work on client location and I have to face my senior and I can't get away with it hence all the arguments of ignoring doesn't apply here. – CodeYogi Apr 20 '17 at 13:52
  • Your senior is your supervisor from your own firm who is also on-site? – Teacher KSHuang Apr 21 '17 at 11:56
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I have worked in places that have this mentality. Consultants are disposable and don't get attached to them. Basically you are there so they don't have to hire anyone full time and can stop the contract at their choosing.

Also, as you mentioned this is really poor for everyone as you can't progress as a team with discriminating behavior.

Recommendations:

  1. Be sure you understand the legal terminology for hostile work environment in your country. Some have one and others seem to even allow physical violence without too much recompense.
  2. Discuss with the hiring manager that you feel a hostile work environment is being created by the treatment and you wish to discuss and come to a resolution so that you can best fulfill the contract for the companies benefit regardless of whether you get another contract or not. Be professional and try to avoid names, but talk of attitudes and specific comments.
  3. Try to honor the contract, but get yourself somewhere that the environment leaves you feeling safe and healthy to work at.

Good luck and sorry you are in that environment.

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    Should I make these much efforts to remain in such organisation? I talked to my manager but I don't think they can do much as they are running a consultancy and just for one resource they cannot afford to argue with the host company. – CodeYogi Apr 20 '17 at 4:39
  • Only you can say how much you can take. It looks much better on a resume to adhere to the notice and break cleanly, otherwise you might jeopardize your future impression...but if you can't take anymore you can't take anymore. Check on the legality though cause if you break contract you might not be able to work in the same sector for a competitor for x period of time. – mutt Apr 20 '17 at 4:44
  • I have been here since less than 2 months. – CodeYogi Apr 20 '17 at 4:48
  • sorry @CodeYogi but that is a choice you will have to make. Perhaps your consultancy can advise you on the specific contract/company specifics or even swap you to another contract. – mutt Apr 20 '17 at 4:53
  • @mutt "consultant" does imply a short term contractor many FTE roles are called consultants – Neuromancer Apr 21 '17 at 17:04
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As a consultant this shouldn't be allowed to bother you, all you should be doing is concentrating on your tasks and collecting your money.

Most places I work as a consultant I have little to do with the normal staff in terms of socialising. I'm polite but keep my distance. I don't answer to them and I may need to investigate them at some point. In fact I know that many are jealous despite smiling to my face and would not hesitate to stab me in the back. I get paid more than them and am outside their authority hierarchy. The longer you work there the more respect you will get, but you will always be different.

Your situation might be different in details but in general this should not be a concern for a professional consultant.

  • You are basically saying don't worry about it. – JTC Apr 20 '17 at 9:16
  • But what if I am aksed why I am late to office or which doctor you met when you took off yesterday? or because of you others code are breaking. – CodeYogi Apr 20 '17 at 9:41
  • Why are you late? Why is your code breaking others? Consultants don't have the cushion of full time employees, they need to watch their backs at all times and have a solid paper trail on everything. – Kilisi Apr 20 '17 at 10:57
  • Who told the statements are correct, these are the allegations which I obviously don't like. Mind it I told she is a senior and not Manager or VP and both of them have no issues with me, the only dilemma is they don't sit at my office location. – CodeYogi Apr 20 '17 at 14:56
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    you are making assumptions about the status of consultants – Neuromancer Apr 21 '17 at 17:05
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As a consultant you should focus on the job in front of you not on building relationships which will inevitably cause friction with colleagues.

Some workplaces are happy for consultants to become part of the team - attend meetings, value their opinions, consult them on the medium term team planning, after works drinks etc.

Some want consultants to be 'an extra pair of hands' & nothing else.

If you are in a role where the company wants you to do a job of work but have no lasting influence on the team - perhaps they fear that their guys will be encouraged to become consultants if you are treated too well?

What the company wants should dictate your working practices - if you can't deal with the situation then politely give your notice, get your head down, professionally finish up & move on.

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