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A Short Background
The Lead Programmer (L.P.) was my professor at a college I attended. Then the Operations Manager (O.M.) was a student of the Lead Programmer.

A year ago (February 2016). A start-up company has been founded by the O.M.’s cousin (with more of a Civil Engineering background than a software one). The O.M. hired the L.P. probably because he was her professor at the college she attended.

So fast forward November 2016, I was looking for a company to finish my On-the-Job Training then my professor/L.P. encouraged me to try where he was working. Fast forward again I chose the start-up company for some reason, mostly personal preferences at the time.

The company by the way has four employees: one which is L.P., coming from many backgrounds such as Multimedia, Game and Software Development, and the other three which was originally into Game Development.

Days as an Intern
I was assigned on a project where I have to continue working on the L.P.'s primary project (a new software for the Founder's main company). He turned me over his progress (incl. documentations) and I saw this kind of code structure almost all throughout the project files:

<?php // some PHP code placed here, mostly includes. ?> <html> <head> <!-- lots of internal CSS placed here --> </head> <body> <!-- lots of JS code placed here --> <?php // some more includes. ?> <!-- then HTML elements --> <?php // then some other PHP code for processing data. ?> <!-- then some HTML elements again --> </body> </html>

I immediately saw problems raining down on me regarding the L.P.'s ways in my first day as an intern. I'll just enumerate the following that I have observed during my Internship:

  1. The source was literally full of spaghetti code - I mean, it did not even followed basic directory structure for MVC, which in my opinion a big problem when it comes to maintaining and expanding the system in the long run.
  2. The project did not use a framework - This project is developed in PHP by the way. This particular project involves a complex business process (a lot of construction material types are being tested and computed manually and the Founder wants it to be computerized). I believe a framework is necessary for a project of this scale.
  3. Version control system was nonexistent - It is way too hard to track changes on the code of the project without VCS.
  4. Incomplete business/code documentation - Some business documents were lacking for the project.

My observations in number 1 and 2 were addressed during my Internship and the number 3 and 4 during my time as an employee. I was somehow able to get his attention on these problems and act on it.

Days as an Employee (March 2017)
While my time as an intern discovered technical difficulties, this time I encountered behavioral difficulties with our Lead. The very next day after I signed my employment, he was absent from work for four (4) consecutive days. That was when my colleagues (including my O.M.) opened up about the absenteeism of the Lead and they told me the work situation.

When I asked the O.M. how come she did not get strict on the absences of the Lead, she said that it was because she feels embarrassed (and awkward) to reproach the Lead that once became her professor.

My Question Then Is This:
With this kind of situation in mind, I am not having a second thought to leaving this company for good and pursue a chance of a better career on another one.

But before I do that, I would like to talk one-on-one to my Operations Manager about the situation(s) regarding our Lead. I would like to ask the following: (1) how should I deliver my concerns in detail to our O.M.? and (2) is it really a good idea to do this? why or why not?

P.S. I would like to see this start-up company grow and thrive, even if it means I have to leave it.

P.P.S. I'm a fresh graduate so I really have next-to-zero experience in dealing with these scenarios.

closed as off-topic by gnat, paparazzo, TrueDub, Mister Positive, JasonJ Apr 24 '17 at 13:21

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for advice on what to do are not practical answerable questions (e.g. "what job should I take?", or "what skills should I learn?"). Questions should get answers explaining why and how to make a decision, not advice on what to do. For more information, click here." – gnat, paparazzo, TrueDub, Mister Positive, JasonJ
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  • 3
    Sounds to me like this company is going down. – AndreiROM Apr 24 '17 at 4:15
  • Sounds as though you've discussed this at least somewhat with the O.M., If not in detail and/or not about the technical concerns. Can you clarify what was discussed? – heathenJesus Apr 24 '17 at 5:33
  • @heathenJesus we have previously discussed about the reason why the Lead was frequently absent without sufficient cause or official leave and our O.M. shared her observation that it was one of the Lead's negative work behavior. – Sylvan Cahilog Apr 26 '17 at 4:39
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You are right over

But before I do that, shall I go out of my way and talk one-on-one to my Operations Manager about the situation(s) regarding our Lead?

It is good to be good,but not at the sake of your own future. I suggest you to hurry up and clear the matter with your OP and clear out everything.

Considering:

he was absent from work for four (4) consecutive days.

Your LP seems to be busy with some other work and is not able to concentrate over the work in company.

Considering:

I would like to see this start-up company grow and thrive, even if it means I have to leave it.

You are not going to be the last among the fresh graduate as they are the main employees for such start ups. So others like you are also bound to face problems you are facing.So the best thing I can suggest is talk to the OP regarding that.

When I asked the O.M. how come she did not get strict on the absences of the Lead, she said that it was because she feels embarrassed (and awkward) to reproach the Lead that once became her professor.

Now your OM seems to also having issues with your LP.So the above meeting will go in your favour only. And if your OM wants your company to last then she'll have to show up and take some actions and clear out with LP because this way your company is only going down and things only gonna get worsen.

Considering your employee strength there are only 5 employee.So the company must be hiring new employee and with such situation others are also gonna feel the same as you.

  • "Your LP seems to be busy with college work and is not able to concentrate over the work in company." He is no longer working as a professor. Also, I failed to mention specifically that it was not the first time where he was absent without sufficient cause. – Sylvan Cahilog Apr 24 '17 at 7:28
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    Anyway, thanks for your input sir. I really appreciate it. – Sylvan Cahilog Apr 24 '17 at 7:28
2

Don't "volunteer" information. But do "speak when spoken to," given that the O.M. has acknowledged the problem.

If you want to get the ball rolling, you might tell the O.M. something like, "You and I had the same professor. If you want to talk about it at any time, please let me know." Then let her take it from there.

It's good of you to try to save the company. Don't push it too far, but do let them know about your willingness to "talk."

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