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I am final year engineering student and have recently applied a job in one of the companies that required minimum credit grade for the graducate position. Now, I have received an email from the recruiter asking the transcript from the university.

I am also interested how they worded the "would it be possible for you to sent the transcript?".

As the grade is below their requirement, how can I avoid giving transcript and still process to the further stage? Is there a trick or email that will be appropriate to deny their request and move further on recruitment process?

This question doesn't ask, how to dodge the company by not giving transcript or using fake transcripts. This question aims to get advice, for the newly graduate with low grade when facing this kind of situation.

Based on the advice received from experienced person is that polite deny their request for the transcript and try to get into the interview. From the interview, the interviewer will get to know you in person then you will be able to explain how the grade was affected by other volunteer works and extra curriculum activities. How you are genuinely interested in the company and able show your communication skills in the interview.

The key is that let the company know you more personally instead of just deciding on the grade/transcript.

closed as unclear what you're asking by Masked Man, JasonJ, IDrinkandIKnowThings, gnat, Michael Grubey Apr 27 '17 at 4:58

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  • I would have to say probably not. They have asked for it, by denying it in any way they will probably not take it any further. Can't trick your way into a job. – Bugs Apr 26 '17 at 9:34
  • even if you find a way to avoid it now, they will learn your grade at some point, so hiding your transcript is not a solution. How low is your grade compared to the required grade? I'd send the transcript without mentioning the grade, and the best you can hope is that they ask about the grade, giving you the opportunity to explain why you feel you still would be an amazing candidate. Of course if they are very strict about the minimum grade, they will reject your application right after receiving the transcript, but you didn't match the requirement anyway, so it's the normal outcome. – Kerkyra Apr 26 '17 at 9:47
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    @Lilienthal, sometimes a requirement is not really a requirement. Job descriptions aren't known for accuracy. The OP simply did not take that particular requirement seriously and that is reasonable especially if the grade was close to the "requirement". He should submit the transcript and hope for the best. No need to accuse him of lying and being unprofessional. Such withering dismissals to questions are a serious problem on stackexchange. – teego1967 Apr 26 '17 at 9:50
  • @teego1967 The inaccuracy of job descriptions certainly doesn't extend to grade requirements. That's not the same as an inflated "years' experience" requirement or listing a nice to have. It's the company making a clear decision to not hire below a certain level of academic achievement. The fact that they're verifying transcripts should make that obvious. OP is trying to apply for a job when he doesn't meet the requirements and is trying to hide it. That is lying, plain and simple. I'm asking the question in case there are circumstances justifying OP's action, not being dismissive. – Lilienthal Apr 26 '17 at 9:58
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    @teego1967 even if this grade requirement is able to slide, the asker is explicitly trying to hide their actual grade. Instead of responding with the transcript, hoping for a reasonable comparison of their grade to the preference , they're attempting to obfuscate and ignore the requirement entirely. This is extremely unprofessional behaviour; lying by ommision is still lying. – user53718 Apr 26 '17 at 10:01
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As the grade is below their requirement, how can I avoid giving transcript and still process to the further stage? Is there a trick or email that will be appropriate to deny their request and move further on recruitment process?

I suppose you could ask if your transcript is a must and hope that it isn't.

But any employer that specifically lists a grade requirement almost certainly will need to see your transcript. So I don't realistically see any way to avoid that.

You best bet is to provide the transcript, along with a cover letter explaining how your other attributes make up for this deficiency.

Perhaps your other grades were so good that they overshadow this one substandard grade. Perhaps you took other, related, classes and did well in those. Perhaps your work experience can help overcome this one issue. Think about it and be creative.

There aren't any tricks here to avoid giving a potential employer what they require. But sometimes the overall package you offer is compelling in spite of the grade.

  • "along with a cover letter explaining how your other attributes make up for this deficiency" - should this note be an attachment or just part of the e-mail that you use to send the transcript attachment? – Brandin Apr 26 '17 at 11:15
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As the grade is below their requirement, how can I avoid giving transcript and still process to the further stage?

You can't. If they're asking for your transcript you're going to need to send it to them to comply with the way their hiring process works. Their use of "would it be possible" is simply out of politeness. This isn't optional for them.

Is there a trick or email that will be appropriate to deny their request and move further on recruitment process?

A trick? Sure, you can commit transcript fraud by sending them a fake transcript. I should hopefully not have to tell you what a terrible idea that is.

There is simply no way in the modern age to claim some kind of hardship that would excuse you from simply sending them a copy of your transcript. Any attempt to dodge this requirement and avoid sending your transcript in would be considered an automatic red flag.

Even if you found some magical way to avoid sending it in, if you don't mention that you don't meet a clearly listed grade requirement, that's tantamount to lying about your credentials. Such lies have a habit of being discovered eventually at which point you're typically out of a job and your reputation will suffer greatly.

At this point, I would say that you should give up on this job. You applied knowing that you'd want to keep your insufficient academic record secret and confessing that fact now that the company wants to verify it will not endear you to the hiring manager. You theoretically don't have anything to lose by trying but I don't see any way to salvage this.

  • The last two paragraphs are too negative. You made your point already with "any attempt to dodge this requirement." Giving up on the job at this point is also bad advice; if you've already applied, just continue, but don't try to hide things. – Brandin Apr 26 '17 at 11:11
  • @Brandin I realise that they're harsh statements but those paragraphs cover the problems OP could run into in two distinct scenarios. The odds of success in disclosing the grades now depend entirely on whether it's been brought up before and the OP's reaction at the time but simply put they're not good. And there is a non-neglible chance of a reputation hit in certain industries which is why I'd recommend moving on over trying to salvage a position, especially given the likelihood that there are multiple other candidates who do meet all qualifications. – Lilienthal Apr 26 '17 at 11:17
  • Actually, there are other ways to tabulate academic performance (eg GPA in last N semesters,or in-major GPA). Very bad advice for the OP to just "give up" especially if he can make a compelling case for his candidacy for that position. See Joe's answer. – teego1967 Apr 26 '17 at 16:09

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