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I am a software developer at a major financial institution for the past 4 years. My track record contains many implementations that provided the business with what they needed with hardly any bugs or errors and overall I am a quiet individual who does not cause political turbulence at the office.

I have had the same manager since I joined the company and since the very beginning we did not have a good start. Unfortunately, I have a very strong feeling that she does not like me and working with her makes me very sad.

Even though I do the majority of the software implementation with minimal supervision, My thoughts are rarely valued, I am not included in important meetings, I am micromanaged on later stages of the project(I guess because my team members cannot keep up with he fast pace, so I am criticized on later stages) and I am basically isolated from team discussions on projects. I have noticed the following pattern how the I get isolated:

  1. We have a new project or a software implementation.
  2. I analyze, design, implement and test the project or components that I build.
  3. When the product shows signs of impact and all the necessary pieces are done, I am then phased out.

This has happened numerous times.

In the beginning, As I was entry level and really wanted the experience and the job I never confronted her about my views. I did one time explain to her that I do have much to offer and that I feel isolated, however our relationship did not change that much.

I feel kind of desperate and want to really leave the team and go for a lateral move, I just don't know how I can do this without getting any negative image and progress in my career.

Please share your thoughts.

Thank you.

closed as off-topic by HorusKol, scaaahu, Masked Man, gnat, Michael Grubey Apr 30 '17 at 1:56

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    Write up a resume; start applying for new jobs; hand your notice in when you have a written job offer with a start date. – HorusKol Apr 29 '17 at 0:27
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    @HorusKol have you ever experienced something similar? Have you done a lateral or external move? Please tell me how you felt and the outcome? I am really interested in your thoughts. – Quincy Adams Apr 29 '17 at 1:25
  • I agree, you need a new job with a place where you are respected. This looks like a value and respect issue that you are not by the people you work with and need to find a better place where you are. Hard to change personal biases and after 4 years I doubt it will ever change. – mutt Apr 29 '17 at 1:37
  • @QuincyAdams my last job move was to an equivalent position in a different company (so, lateral and external to use your description). While my situation at my old job wasn't as bad as yours, I still had some unresolvable issues of contention with my manager. Since I already had a job, I was able to be really picky on what my next move would be and actually took a few months (albeit, I only made a handful of applications) before starting at my current job - since then, I've gained a promotion and work in a great environment. – HorusKol Apr 29 '17 at 2:00
  • @HorusKol thank you for your input. I applied for a few internal positions and was relativly easy to get an offer. I also got 2 offers within my org, I picked the one outside my org. I am excited and happy to start my new position and management in my org are not really happy. everything seems to be lining up and I feel that I have grown from this experience. – Quincy Adams Jun 10 '17 at 11:25
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I think you are trying to deal with two different issues. One is how you feel about your work and team and how to handle it and the second is how to make a lateral move. At the same time it also feels like you have made up your mind to move out since you say you feel sad about working with your boss and you are desperate to move. If you have already reached that stage of desperation then do not worry about the first issue (i.e. how you are feeling isolated) and think forward. You have spent 4 years at this place and it is reasonable time to move if you decide current role is not helping you progress in your career.

My point is rather than thinking (and being sad) about the issues and reasons, focus only on moving out as a career progression move. You can

  1. Talk to your manager and inform her that after 4 years in this team you are looking for a different role. Do not complain about your involvement. Whether they truly care for you or they really do not value your work, in either case she should support your decision to move and in fact help you in your lateral move. (Her intentions might be different but you do not have to worry about it)

  2. Start applying for other internal jobs after this initial discussion. Since you have already informed your manager about your intentions, it should be okay to apply to other positions in other teams.

  3. Start applying externally as well. Depending on the company size and politics, it may be easier for you to get a job you like outside than inside.

  • Very well said. – selbie Apr 29 '17 at 18:44
  • Thanks PagMax. I applied internally and I have provided an update on the post above. Your and all thoughts shared were very important to me and I appreciate it. – Quincy Adams Jun 10 '17 at 11:27

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