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More than 10 years ago I wrote two journal papers that were published in journals. Is it worth putting this on my resume, will it raise flags in the eyes of hiring managers?

One of the thoughts in my mind is that since there were just two, and I worked on them a long time ago it might raise negative flags akin to a gap in employment?

The work/content of the papers is arguably relevant for the types of research and development positions I plan on applying for, in the sense that they are in related technical domains. What's happened is that after that time, I focused more on writing internal technical reports for my organization, and so have not published anything publicly.

  • showing publication gap is better than not showing them at all!! In any case, it is not uncommon to have such gaps depending on your job role. Like someone jumping from academia to industry may not publish at same rate as before because their company does not allow it..so it is not akin to gap in employment – PagMax May 4 '17 at 2:48
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More than 10 years ago I wrote two journal papers that were published in journals. Is it worth putting this on my resume, will it raise flags in the eyes of hiring managers?

One of the thoughts in my mind is that since there were just two, and I worked on them a long time ago it might raise negative flags akin to a gap in employment?

Yes, you should certainly include such publications in your resume.

I seriously doubt that 10 year old publications could cause any sorts of problems in the eyes of a hiring manager unless the norm for your profession is continual publication.

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If the published papers are relevant to the field of work you're applying for, then include them - just don't put too much emphasis on them.

You should be putting your most recent experience at the top, and if part of that is writing internal reports then you should be including that as part of the description of your most recent positions.

Then, as an additional section under your work experience you can include references to the papers. If they're still easily available, they might even be read (or at least, glanced over).

Like Joe says - there's almost no negative to including references to the papers, unless you don't provide more recent relevant work experience on top of it.

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