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I had a phone interview about an hour and a half ago with a recruiter for a Summer internship and the person who would be my boss if I were to get the job. The recruiter was the one who contacted me, so I have her email, but she didn't mention that there would be someone else involved until I was actually on the phone with her. I know his first name, but not his last name or his exact position.

I found someone who MIGHT be him on LinkedIn, but I don't want to accidentally send it to the wrong person, especially since I'll have to guess the email.

Would It be rude to just send a thank you to the recruiter? Should I just not send a letter at all?

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    Do people really do this? I've never sent or received a thank you letter for an interview, and would be a bit creeped out if I did get one. It would feel pushy. – Gabe Sechan May 12 '17 at 4:55
  • I use to do that but realized that my sending thanks is of absolutely no value on the interviewer perception about me; forget the outcome of the interview. Stopped doing that lately and it has never effected my career growth. – PagMax May 20 '17 at 6:28
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Would It be rude to just send a thank you to the recruiter? Should I just not send a letter at all?

Go ahead and send your thank you note to the contact you have. Don't guess at the other person's name and contact info -- you might get it wrong and create a confusing situation, and even if you get it right, they might wonder how you got that information if they didn't offer it.

Thank the recruiter for the opportunity to talk. You could include a line like "I don't have contact information for Joe, but please let him know that I enjoyed talking and hope that the conversation continues." That way you've made a gesture of thanks to the best of your ability, and that's all that most people would expect of you.

  • I would add to make a note to thank the interviewer and the recruiter as well, as he/she was also involved in the "interview" process – Robert Dundon May 19 '17 at 19:22
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    @RobertDundon The whole problem here is that the OP would like to thank both the recruiter and the manager, but only has contact info for the recruiter. My suggestion is to thank the recruiter, and to ask the recruiter to forward the thanks as well to the manager since the OP can't thank them directly. – Caleb May 19 '17 at 19:30
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    Whoops, I just missed your entire sentence: Thank the recruiter for the opportunity to talk. Never mind then :) – Robert Dundon May 19 '17 at 20:31
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I think you are over excited about the job.

I had a phone interview about an hour and a half ago with a recruiter for a Summer internship and the person who would be my boss if I were to get the job. 

This certainly suggest you're not sure of getting internship.Even if you are there are gonna be a hundred occasions where you can thank him. I don't think thanking someone for taking interview is a great thing to do.You could have thanked him before the end of the call but at this moment I don't find it legitimate effort.

An answer from this question:Should a thank you letter be sent after an interview?

My advice is that it's not needed... Unless you have a lot of great competition trying for the same job. In that case you have to run faster than the guy next to you if you want the job and a good thank you letter could set you apart. If you write a thank you letter it better be well-written or it could kill a great interview.

So according to me it is more of a risk then being helpful.So I would prefer not giving it and If you still prefer giving it you can refer to Caleb's answer.

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    It is very common practice to send an interviewer a thank you letter or email, particularly before you know if you have gotten the job. See this question for more details: Should a thank you letter be sent after an interview? – David K May 19 '17 at 18:45
  • Thanks David I didn't knew of the practise before but besides the accepted answer I see that other are suggesting that it is not of much use.Yet I'll edit my answer accordingly. – Black Mamba May 20 '17 at 5:04

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