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I was fired for performance issues from my previous job and am not sure how to mention this in an interview without severely hampering my chances.

I really did not enjoy the job, it was not fulfilling and the commute was soul crushing, all of which manifested in my performance.

Also, I was initially brought on in for a marketing writer position and due to restructuring was then placed in sales / technical proposal writing, for which I was technically under qualified and from which I was then terminated.

How much do I reveal in an interview and how do I discuss these details while still communicating that those performance issues do not represent my work ethic, just a mismatch between me and the position?

marked as duplicate by The Wandering Dev Manager, Carson63000, Chris E, DJClayworth, scaaahu May 16 '17 at 3:58

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How much do I reveal in an interview and how do I discuss these details while still communicating that those performance issues do not represent my work ethic, just a mismatch between me and the position?

I may come across as harsh in my answer here, but I'm trying to convey what I see based on many years of being a hiring manager.

Try to be honest, and try to avoid the "I didn't like the job so my performance was poor" excuses that you include in your question. Those will not come across well to the interviewer.

You should indicate that you were fired for your performance. Don't lie about the reason.

You should try to convey that you unfortunately let your dislike for the job affect you negatively and that it came out in performance issues.

You could indicate that you were a mismatch for the position, but try hard not to come across as whiney, or blaming the company. You could talk about how you struggled with a challenging position that proved too much for you, assuming that you aren't applying for a similar position.

You should probably skip the parts about "not fulfilling" and "soul crushing commute". The logical followup to those items would be "So why didn't you just find a better job and leave rather than choose to perform poorly and wait to be fired?"

You should try to talk about what you learned from this incident (perhaps you are contrite? perhaps you are wiser now?). You must indicate why this won't happen again.

  • Or just say boiler-plate stuff like "It was never a good fit and the company was going through a series of restructurings"? I usually say that when asked, – Ammar Naseer May 17 '17 at 14:39

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