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I started doing programming 2+ years ago, but only for my personal projects and the people I work with in other fields that needed web apps. Because of my lack of experience in a professional environment, I still consider myself an entry-level developer that, probably, is a good fit for a junior developer jobs.

Anyway, one week ago I received a phone call to schedule a job interview for a well known software company in a couple of days. I fulfill the criteriums for the job, but still I feel that I lack many stuff connected to the 'developers mindset'. I am afraid that I will waste the time of the interviewers and I will end up embarassing myself.

Another thing is that, I don't see myself working in this field in the future, so I feel more relaxed about the whole process. I plan to do programming, but just as a tool that is applied in other sciences. Should I see this interview as an opportunity to practice interviewing, or should I just tell the recruiter that I won't come to the interview and reject the scheduled conversation?

closed as off-topic by Masked Man, scaaahu, Mister Positive, JasonJ, Chris E May 25 '17 at 14:49

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  • As you said, it will be a good experience for you. You'll be more prepared personally when the right role comes along. – user34587 May 25 '17 at 9:52
  • Have you heard of Imposter Syndrome? – David K May 25 '17 at 12:22
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An interview, to me, says that, on paper, you have been deemed to have the technical skills to do the job.

The purpose of the interview is to

  1. See if you are lying about your skills.
  2. Judge if your personality fits into their team/company.
  3. Allow you to judge if you want to work for them.

If you aren't up to the job, then it's an issue for the recruiter, not you. Back yourself and have a little faith, you may be better than you think :)

  • For the record, it went great. – birdybird03 May 26 '17 at 18:47
  • Glad to hear it – Andrew Berry May 26 '17 at 18:48
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I don't see myself working in this field in the future, so I feel more relaxed about the whole process. I plan to do programming, but just as a tool that is applied in other sciences. Should I see this interview as an opportunity to practice interviewing,

Consider whether you would accept the job if it were offered or not.

If you would accept the job, then go on the interview, give it your best shot, and consider it as good interviewing experience if you are rejected.

If you wouldn't accept the job even if offered, then decline the opportunity. Don't waste the interviewer's time. Find a more likely job and apply for it.

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a tool that is applied in other sciences.

Thats pretty much most of the applications of programming right now though. Noone sane pays you to program just for the sake of it. There are applications in commerce/communications/banking/interacting with the public sector/IOT/advancing another science(ie biology) just to name a few, they dont hire you to be a computer scientist(usally). Now if the company that you seek hiring at, isnt in a field that you have interest in or seeks for someone for a specific programming task/technology that isnt of interest to you then by all means just go to the interview as a practice since you want some and just respectfully decline afterwards.

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