4

Say I worked on a processor doing 'Sensor-Fusion', should I add a brief explanation like:

Sensor Fusion - an Algorithmic Fusion of data from multiple sensors in order to achieve better accuracy as well as derive new data.

or should I neglect this term completely and only explain in plain english?

2
  • @JoeStrazzere generally good advice - though I'm interested what would you suggest for my degree title: BSc Cybernetics and Control Engineering - most people I've worked with aren't sure what Cybernetics really means. – HorusKol Jun 20 '17 at 6:44
  • HR people only know of buzz words, so if you can somehow explain this term in a sentence or two including relevant buzz words used,even the better for you. – Leon Jun 20 '17 at 13:29
7

If the term isn't something instantly recognizable by the audience (potentially HR, hiring managers, and technical staff) that will read the resume, leave it out. Provide as brief an explanation of the technology as you can, but don't omit your relevant experience on the project.

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  • 2
    +1 If the words won't mean something to the people who read your resume, then pick different words. – David K Jun 19 '17 at 18:29
  • 2
    Or different people to read them :-) – Mawg says reinstate Monica Jun 20 '17 at 11:57
-1

Most non-technical persons would not know what that technical term means but rather what they know is the technology name. You should provide a reference link or something which depicts the explanation but should only write the Technical Term.

It may happen that a technical interviewer may want to understand that from you in that case you have better idea to explain.

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  • 1
    I would not put a reference link on a CV. – AndyT Jun 20 '17 at 16:08
  • that's a personal perspective but most non-technical persons like if they've explanations handy and more clear from genuine source. – ThunderMind Jun 20 '17 at 16:34

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