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I've been working at my job for over 2 years. I was originally hired as a full time receptionist at $10/hr. (job description: answer phone, send out invoices).

I was told that after 6 months I would receive my performance review and possibly a raise (which I understood), and I have yet to receive a review ever. After being here for 2 years now, I do so much more than just receptionist duties, so much so that I'm essentially the office manager.

After I had been with this company for about 1.5 years, we were bought out by a much bigger/larger company that would take over payroll and eventually we would switch over to their policies. I was able to have a meeting with our new HR team, where they informed me that someone at our head office opted out of the yearly reviews because "we had recently done them".

After speaking with coworkers, I learned that no one had gotten a raise or a review. Some hadn't gotten either in 4+ years but were loyal to the company. Now at about 2 years of employment, 2 other coworkers have quit in the same month because they asked for reviews and raises and were denied (after fairly big promotions). I'm ready to speak to our new HR department, but I'm not sure if there is something more that needs to happen before I start requesting a raise. (I have also asked our HR and my direct supervisor, but it all goes back to our one and only HR person, and she's the one refusing).

Is this also something I should maybe file as unethical with our new parent company?

I'm not only worried about myself, but also my coworkers who have become my friends and some are very close family friends. I've updated my resume and started looking for other jobs, but with my health issues I'm unable to quit and look because health insurance is a big need for me.

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    It certainly strikes me as unethical that someone in your company told the parent company reviews had been recently conducted, when according to your research, none have been conducted in over 4 years. I mean, that's a lie, plain and simple. The consequences of it, I don't know, but I would certainly report it up the chain to someone in the parent company, so that they at least know they're being lied to. – Steve-O Jun 26 '17 at 17:07
  • You may want to make use of paragraphs. At the moment its a giant wall of text. – Mister Positive Jun 26 '17 at 17:26
  • "I have yet to receive a review ever. After being here for 2 years now" - If I was told a review would happen after 6 months, I would ask about the review at that point, not 2 years later. If you feel you are entitled to a raise, you should ask for one, of course the company might feel differently. – Ramhound Jun 26 '17 at 18:30
  • Loyalty to a company is insane. Find a new job while still working there, and get to the new job as soon as possible. – Fattie Jun 26 '17 at 20:02
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I'm ready to speak to our new HR department, but I'm not sure if there is something more that needs to happen before I start requesting a raise. (I have also asked our HR and my direct supervisor, but it all goes back to our one and only HR person, and she's the one refusing). Is this also something I should maybe file as unethical with our new parent company?

If you feel you are due for a raise, you should first bring it up with your manager. If that doesn't get anywhere, bring it up with HR. It's possible that the new HR misunderstood what happened when they cancelled your review.

Don't "file as unethical" - that will start you down a path that's best avoided. Remember, unless local laws or union rules say otherwise, an employer is not required to conduct a review, or give you a raise - ever. And "unfair" isn't the same as "unethical". Don't assume malice, just assume confusion.

Talk with your manager/HR. Explain why you are worth more now than you were when you started. Explain how you were promised a review. Explain how you were expecting a raise. But focus on the value you bring to the company.

I've updated my resume and started looking for other jobs, but with my health issues I'm unable to quit and look because health insurance is a big need for me.

Even without health issues, it's almost always a mistake to quit a job before you have your next job lined up.

If you decide to go that route, get a new job first, then quit this one.

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