1

So in my team (5 persons, I'm not the manager) we recently (2 months ago) hired a new developper, that has ~3 years experience.

However, this person has a kind of "difficult" behavior, in the sense that he is un-cooperative / un-communicative. For instance:

  • missing all daily stand-ups for the past 3 weeks
  • arguing (unreasonably IMO) about code reviews: ie "what you are suggesting I change is almost the same thing as what I wrote"
  • not documenting/reporting what he has been working on (for instance I know he coded some stuff on topic X, but I don't know the specifics because it was not documented anywhere)
  • taking on new tasks loosely related to his initial task, that we never asked for, but that another team asked for if he had time (without consulting with us)

As a whole, I feel like this person wants to be left alone in his work, and is reacting badly (as if he is being pried on) when someone want to discuss his work.

However, we are a small team and are very "agile" in the sense that usually everyone is helping each other and everyone knows what everyone is doing and can replace him. As a result I feel like having this person is creating a bad "mood" in the team, where now we are awkwardly working with one member that seems to be "closed" all the time. Should I voice my concerns to my boss / other colleagues? what can I do in my position?

  • Have you tactfully and quietly brought this up with the team leader? If the team leader is happy with the situation, the team is on the skids and your best bet is to jump to another team, if possible. – Ed Plunkett Jun 26 '17 at 19:48
  • Tell Your Boss. – Fattie Jun 26 '17 at 19:59
  • Is this person trained in agile working processes? Or is this a new concept for them and s/he just not aware of its benefits? – Arsak Jun 27 '17 at 7:46
  • Point 1: Not your problem, let you team lead handle it. Point 2/3: Refer to each other. You can't give valuable feedback if they do not provide documentation. And it's perfectly reasonable to point that out. Point 4: Again, your team lead's problem. – skymningen Jun 27 '17 at 9:09
5

Talk to the Team

How does the Team feel about this behavior?

Have you discussed this at your stand ups as a blocker to the overall success of the Team (the person isn't there anyway, and even if he were, he needs to be told)?

Does your Agile Coach know about these things?

The Team should decide, and if it decides that the behavior is unacceptable, then they inform the Coach that something needs to be changed.

  • +1. In an agile environment talk to the team before the boss. If his behviour does not change,the boss may need to be involved. – DJClayworth Jun 26 '17 at 21:16
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You don't need to do anything unless you are his superior except keep your back covered and your work documented. If management want to know your opinion they will ask you, but it's their responsibility to make sure this chap is pulling his weight properly, and this is one of the reasons there are probation periods in most professional jobs.

Nothing good for you personally is likely to come out of bad mouthing colleagues. It's not a reputation you want to have and it's not your role to babysit your colleagues.

1

Your group should have a Agile coach / Scrum master / whatever.

He should be made aware of this issue. If you have been docummenting the issue, give the documentation to him, or offer to make a full documentation. The scrum master should present the issue to the manager.

As the other reply says, you need to get the opinion of the team before acting. Maybe it's a non-issue for them. Maybe they can point out more problems with his behaviour. If the team think there is an issue, you can present the problem to the agile coach.

The agile coach should remember the team members that it's not acceptable to miss all stand-ups. If it continues, he should bring the absences to the manager.

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