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My current employer, a software development company, unfortunately took a significant financial loss when the main client started having funding issues. This has left my employer in a position where it can no longer support full-time developers.

It has been a pleasure working here, and I'm certain everyone here would agree.

My employer supports and encourages everyone to look for other full-time work while leaving the door open for part-time work, if we would like to take it.

I have worked at this company for about 7 months now and it is my first job as a junior software developer (I majored in History and pursued software development after graduating).

Should I mention my current employer's position in my cover letter?

I feel that, because of my short tenure here, it might not look like I am the most stable and consistent worker without the context.

I do plan on continuing to work for my current employer on a part-time basis when I can after I find my next full-time job. I have learned a lot here.


To address the raised concern that my question may be a duplicate of Why is it not a good idea to “badmouth” a previous employer?, I'm going to have to disagree. My intentions would never be to bad mouth or paint my employer in a bad light -- and I would have never shaped the language in my cover letter to come off as if I was. I respect my employer, as I'm sure all the employees here do.

My concern for bringing up the question was because, I now recognize out of inexperience in the field, I was worried my short tenure here at my first junior developer job would paint me as a potentially bad employee who is jumping ship in a job too quickly. I was concerned this could possibly raise a flag when, for example, a hiring manager would scan my resume.

In reality, I loved this job and thoroughly enjoyed my employer -- and am only seeking a new job because they can no longer support us. Which is what I wanted to convey, by raising this question.

  • No need to mention it at all. It's completely and totally normal in your field to change jobs after 6 months or so. And it's so common that companies go bust it's not even worth mentioning at all. – Fattie Jul 7 '17 at 23:38
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    Possible duplicate of Why is it not a good idea to "badmouth" a previous employer? – gnat Jul 8 '17 at 16:12
  • How is this even remotely close to being a duplicate of that question? – DCON Jul 10 '17 at 10:21
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As a hiring manager, I wouldn't expect you to write about your employer's financial situation in your cover letter. I would save your explanation for when you are asked why you are pursuing other opportunities.

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    Should probably be "for when you are asked...". SE won't let me propose the edit since it is only 4 characters. – Brandin Jul 8 '17 at 18:55
  • Thank you for the answer. You confirmed some intuitions I felt. Still, having an outside perspective and other peoples' input helped give me clarity during this transition. I appreciate it! – DevManSam Jul 9 '17 at 4:50
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The cover letter is usually expected to be:

  • A presentation about yourself
  • A explanation of how do you think that you skills match the role requirements.
  • And a explanation of your motivations to apply to the role (and the company)

There should not be any mention to your current company, your current role or your current status (unless otherwise stated, of course).

  • Thank you for your answer. This description of what a cover letter is expected to be will actually help a lot as I craft my cover letters from now on. Thanks! – DevManSam Jul 9 '17 at 4:52
  • "motivations to apply to the role" could seem to include "my current company is going through financial trouble", but I presume it does not because it is a reason to apply to just about ANY role, while the cover letter is about THIS role – Rolazaro Azeveires Jul 9 '17 at 11:07
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No. I would sort out applicants who do that, unless it is in the news already (and then there should be no reason to write it).

Reasoning: An employee who discloses such information to the outside can not be trusted.

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