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So I was recently terminated (fired, officially on paper as laid off) from employment. Friday I was talking about the need to hire someone to manage a system we had no one officially to manage. I was already working 2 roles, and they wanted me to do that. I was temporarily tasked with implementing a new system for tracking services and field technician dispatches, which was then supposed to be handed off to the dispatching department (and it was). Anytime I asked about being able to train someone on how to manage the system, there was all kinds of negative response. And this was going to be the backbone of the entire dispatching department.

Everyone just kept complaining it would be too expensive, and I tried to pose the example of "What happens if I'm not in a position to work here any more? I implemented this system, and if I'm not able to train anyone on how to use it, you will have absolutely nobody to support it."

The following Monday, my manager comes to me and told me the company owner said it was my last day because he 'heard a rumor I was looking for a new job'. There was no questions asked, no severance, none of my vacation time got paid out(the company never pays out vacation time, which I think is legal). Literally just 'today is your last day'. And now they genuinely do have nobody to support it.

Is there anything I can do about the situation despite putting in as many job applications as I can? (which I am now doing)

Edit: Clarification

closed as off-topic by David K, mcknz, gnat, Dukeling, Mister Positive Jul 18 '17 at 19:29

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    What is your goal? Do you want your job back? Do you want severance pay? I doubt either is likely to work. – David K Jul 18 '17 at 17:06
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    I can't really speak to US law, but in Canada you can't "lay off" a person without giving something like 8 weeks notice, or severance pay in lieu of notice. Check with a lawyer in your state if something similar applies to you. If you were officially "laid off" with zero notice I think there's a good chance you're owed some severance. If you were officially "fired" then they need a good reason. (Of course, you'd also need to sue to get it, which is not free in itself.) – Steve-O Jul 18 '17 at 17:07
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    @Genko If you want to make sure it's fully legal, then you need to be talking to a lawyer, not to us. – David K Jul 18 '17 at 17:08
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    @Steve-O - in the US they probably don't need a 'good reason' or any reason at all. That's employment at will ... It's sometimes even safer for a company to fire someone 'for no reason' if there's any chance that giving a reason might cause them to run into any anti-discrimination laws. – brhans Jul 18 '17 at 17:11
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    apply for unemployment insurance? – Joe S Jul 18 '17 at 17:16
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Is there anything I can do about the situation despite putting in as many job applications as I can?

Sure.

You can go to your manager and/or the company owner, apologize for throwing off the wrong vibes, assure them that you weren't actually looking for another job, and ask for your job back.

Seems like your example of "What happens if I'm not in a position to work here any more? I implemented this system, and if I'm not able to train anyone on how to use it, you will have absolutely nobody to support it." sent the wrong message.

As I'm sure you know, in the US in an at-will locale, you can be fired for pretty much any reason (or no reason). Unfortunately you have little recourse.

You should contact your local Department of Labor about accrued vacation time. In most locales, you aren't legally entitled to a notice period or severance pay, but you are entitled to be paid for accrued vacation time. see: https://www.thebalance.com/do-you-get-paid-for-unused-time-if-you-re-fired-2060734

And, as one of the commenters mentioned - apply for unemployment immediately.

  • I guess I'll have to stick to putting in applications then. I did try to talk to my manager about it, and he believed me when I explained the situation to him. But when he went to explain the situation to his manager(CMO), the CMO didn't care at all. He just said it didn't matter, and it was my last day. I'll look into the vacation time. I appreciate the response, thank you. – Genko Jul 18 '17 at 17:19
  • While the US is an at will employment country, some states have laws protecting certain activities, and searching for a new job might be one of them. Call a lawyer. – Glen Pierce Jul 21 '17 at 14:47

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