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I had an interview with a tech company and I cleared the online round. After that, I was contacted by one of the recruiters (lets say recruiter 'A') and she set up a phone interview with one of their employees.

I believe I did fairly well and was also expecting a call from them with the details of the next round. it has now been a week since my telephone interview and now I received a call from another recruiter (recruiter 'B') from the same company. She mentioned a bit about A and also asked me if I am open for relocation. I said yes and she said she'd drop an email to me with further details. It's been a day since B called me and I have still not received an email from her.

So my question is, should I get in touch with A and mention about B? Or should I wait for mail from B ?

closed as off-topic by Masked Man, Jim G., SaggingRufus, gnat, Mister Positive Jul 19 '17 at 13:13

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  • What makes you think getting contacted by B wasn't just the next step in the process? What exactly are you concerned about here? Why are you panicking after not receiving an email after a day? – Dukeling Jul 18 '17 at 21:30
  • Not exactly panicking, but it's been more than a week since I had my telephone interview so I was expecting some kind of update after a week and I got a call from another person for what seemed like a different role than what I interviewed for – karun_r Jul 18 '17 at 22:05
  • Did recruiter B tell you a bit about recruiter A, or did they tell you about the company? Why would they tell you about the other recruiter? If they told you about the company and didn't mention your previous interactions with the company at all, you really should've just mentioned that you already had an interview to B. – Dukeling Jul 18 '17 at 22:13
  • Do you know if (either or both of) these recruiters are employees of the company itself or do they work for a recruiting company (and, if the latter, the same recruiting company or a different one)? – Dukeling Jul 18 '17 at 22:35
  • They both work for the same company to which I applied for and not for any recruiting agency. Recruiter B said something like "I know you are working with recruiter A, would you be interested in relocating to another location ?" – karun_r Jul 18 '17 at 22:52
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Calm. Blue. Ocean. :-)

Keep saying that.

I believe I did fairly well and was also expecting a call from them with the details of the next round.

"Expecting" and "going to get" are different things.

You may be assuming you'll get a call based on your own opinion of how you did, but that may not be how they saw it.

Keep an open mind on this and have fewer expectations is a good general rule.

it has now been a week since my telephone interview

They could have hundreds of interviews to perform. It might be a month for all you know.

and now I received a call from another recruiter (recruiter 'B') from the same company. She mentioned a bit about A and also asked me if I am open for relocation. I said yes and she said she'd drop an email to me with further details. It's been a day since B called me and I have still not received an email from her.

Wow. A whole day ! Seriously ?

Develop some patience.

Recruiter B was either getting some follow-up info for A or has a different role she's filling and may require relocation.

These things may require some internal discussion, and they may simply be waiting to complete a full round of interviews and contacts with other candidates before proceeding.

I would never recommend being pushy about contacting recruiters unless you were explicitly told to expect a call or email by a specific date.

And, again, drop the "expectations". They won't do anything but make you more uptight. The best running assumption to make about any interview, IMO, is that you didn't get it. That let's you get on with your life and chase other options.

One thing you do need to do is start asking questions when you're speaking with people. Part of the problem is that you did not get a clear statement from B as to why they were contacting you (instead of or on behalf of A or for a different role entirely).

You should always get a clear idea of why you are being spoken to. You need to know this to properly consider a response to any questions. For example, if I ask you if you are willing to relocate, the answer might be different depending on e.g. exactly what role you'd be relocating for, or to where, or if they give financial support for moving. Generally give an answer like "I'd be willing to consider it, but I'd need a lot more detail. Can you email me what you can about this ?".

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I think at this point you don't really have a lot to be concerned about. It's only been a day since recruiter 'B' said they would send an email. Recruiters in my experience can sometimes take a little longer to follow through on emails than you'd expect. Primarily because they likely deal with multiple candidates for multiple employers, so their workload can be quite large.

If you haven't heard anything within about a week, then I would have cause for concern, and at this point you could safely contact someone regarding an update, something like:

Hello, I was just checking to see if there were any problems that I could help expedite as I haven't received the email you mentioned regarding some further details.

I believe it's important that you contact recruiter 'B' directly about this concern should it get to that point. I think it would be unprofessional to discuss this with the first recruiter. Keep it simple, 'B' said they would email, 'B' failed to email so in the first instance, prompt recruiter 'B'.

  • The problem is , I don't exactly have the contact information of B as received the call from her company telephone. I found her profile on LinkedIn though. Is it okay if I contact her there ? – karun_r Jul 18 '17 at 22:07
  • @karun_r I'd only ever recommend contacting a recruiter through LinkedIn, if you have a fairly good relationship with that recruiter. Is it not possible to call the recruitment agency and ask to speak to recruiter 'B'? – Digitalsa1nt Jul 18 '17 at 22:22
  • So it is better to contact recruiter B now rather than recruiter A ? – karun_r Jul 18 '17 at 22:52
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There is always a flood of recent college graduates put to service in sweatshops that are dressed up like staffing firms. Most will burn out and find employment elsewhere, and their first task is usually to learn to read a script to qualify candidates like you to move to step B, which typically is a technical phone interview.

They get worked 10 to 12 hours per day on a little base salary plus a commission. They get booted if they can't find enough candidates for jobs within a certain number of days. Often these are their first jobs ever, and the fact that they have squeaky clean degrees from the nation's colleges and universities doesn't necessarily translate into demonstrating professionalism.

Don't get caught up on any one opportunity or what a recruiter says, until you've established a "feel" that you're dealing with a mature person and organization. Immature recruiters "oversell" a position with candidates sometimes out of pure desperation. You have to be wise enough to give enough information about yourself for the recruiter to present to the hiring company, and to simultaneously make sure you're not being shown a "golden carrot".

StephenG is correct in sharing with you that one day isn't really a long time. Take that anxiety and dig into more opportunities instead of getting hung up on one. Sometimes, you just have to make sure you're not trying too hard, or you will burn yourself out. Just don't let recruiters' drama wear you down - there are times when it's quite clear that it has nothing to do with you personally.

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