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I've came upon a job proposal in my city where I fullfill half of the jobs requirements as a software developer. On the very top there is a line that says 'No prior development is required but it'll be considered an advantage'. What does this mean?

Also, because of the diverse set of requirements like Java, PHP, Python and Javascript, I think that it's just a HR trick to scare most of the candidates from applying.

closed as unclear what you're asking by Masked Man, Michael Grubey, Dukeling, gnat, Mister Positive Jul 24 '17 at 11:40

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    It means "no prior development is required, but it (prior experience) will be considered an advantage". Voting to close as unclear what you're asking, please clarify why you think it may mean anything other than what it says in plain English. – Masked Man Jul 24 '17 at 3:21
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On the very top there is a line that says 'No prior development is required but it'll be considered an advantage'. What does this mean?

It means:

  • They will consider you even if you have no development experience
  • But if you do have experience, it will give you a better chance at being hired

Also, because of the diverse set of requirements like Java, PHP, Python and Javascript, I think that it's just a HR trick to scare most of the candidates from applying

I don't see why HR would want to scare candidates away from applying. That would make no sense. I see no "trick" here.

  • If anything, they are trying not to scare off new graduates who may have studied the languages they want, but not have actual development experience. – Patricia Shanahan Jul 24 '17 at 2:38
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    There are cases where they actually do want to scare off qualified candidates. But they're very rare. More likely, they're trying to scare off people who they wouldn't want to hire anyway. So if you don't have development experience, I would suggest not applying unless you really hit all the other things they're looking for solidly. – David Schwartz Jul 24 '17 at 2:40
  • Agreed on the rareness of actually trying to scare off candidates; other than trying to generate a paper trail of "we couldn't find anyone" to justify being able to get a work visa for someone else there's no reason to do that. Much more likely is some form of HR clueless/mindless bullet pointing; or the company doing large numbers of short term projects and adding someone with experience in any of several languages being useful vs hiring for a single long term project with a single tech stack. – Dan Neely Jul 24 '17 at 2:49
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    Stating that experience is not required but is an advantage, I would in no way to be an attempt to scare off applicants. It is actually a technique to increase applicants, often for a position which does not really exist, to fill out diversity portfolios. As EEO typically is no longer applied, then the odds are good it is a real entry level position and they are willing to train, but would prefer experience. They are likely offering a low salary however that they expect an experience candidate to decline would be my first inclination. – dlb Jul 24 '17 at 4:34
  • I've read that in some cases hiring managers (when they get to write the job description) will beef up the requirements they're looking for just to scare off potential applicants, in cases where they'd rather hire from within instead of getting someone external filled into a specific role. Dunno how common it is though. – schizoid04 Jul 24 '17 at 7:30

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