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I have five plus years of experience as a graphic designer but I graduated only very recently. Is my experience considered only after graduation or also before? I got paid for the jobs and I have experience letters for all of them.

I am trying for immigration and I heard that any country will consider experience after graduation only. If you know about this please clarify to me whether Canada accepts the work experience before graduation also.

closed as off-topic by Masked Man, JasonJ, David K, Mister Positive, mcknz Jul 24 '17 at 15:01

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    Related: How should I mention any experience I have with children that isn't formal work experience on my CV/resume?. That question is about a different type of job, but similar principles may apply to graphic design. – Brandin Jul 24 '17 at 12:32
  • Hi Brandin i done my intermediate in 2006 and latter so many of my financial problems i had to join in one job so i learn designing and joined one company after several years i got some money and started graduation so that is why my graduation got late. so now tell me is my experience considered or not before the graduation? – Suneel Kumar Jul 24 '17 at 12:59
  • If you have formal work experience, list it as formal work experience, whether it comes before your graduation, during or after. – Brandin Jul 24 '17 at 13:02
  • so it considered as work experience? can i apply for immigration using this experience and my recent graduation?. – Suneel Kumar Jul 24 '17 at 13:05
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    Yes, work experience is considered work experience. Immigration is more complex; try to search for existing answers and/or re-formulate this as a new question. – Brandin Jul 24 '17 at 13:10
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Everything you have done since you were born is experience that can be considered. Not everything should go on your resume, of course.

In this case though, you should definitely list all your experience. The most important stuff goes at the top; it's up to you whether that's your diploma or your previous work.

If you got paid for it, that's definitely good to list. If it's stuff you do for free, then I'd still list it. Minor projects should probably go more to the bottom of the resume. If you happen to have any widely publicly visible projects, they probably need to be closer to the top. (For example, a widely used free template for a CMS or something).

In the end, the work you have done in the past has still taught you a lot, even if you got a diploma afterwards. That experience is worth something, so make sure prospective employers know about it.

  • Hi Erik i got paid for it and i have all experience letters also but i am trying for immigration i heard that any country will consider experience after graduation only. i am stuck in that, if you know well about this please clarify to me that canada accept the work experience before the graduation also. – Suneel Kumar Jul 24 '17 at 12:45
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    @SuneelKumar I've never heard the idea that a country would reject experience from before a graduation before. They might not accept schoolwork or an internship, but I can't imagine anyone ignoring a paid job just because you got a diploma after doing it. – Erik Jul 24 '17 at 12:47
  • @SuneelKumar If you are asking specifically about what counts for your immigration form, then this is a question that should be asked to an immigration lawyer. – David K Jul 24 '17 at 13:29
  • Things you aren't paid for can get used by millions of people (e.g. open-source projects), things you get paid for can get discontinued before anyone sees it and money doesn't affect the technical complexity of any given project. So whether you get paid can be a factor, but it probably shouldn't be the primary factor in determining how much focus to give to any given project. – Dukeling Jul 24 '17 at 13:30
  • @SuneelKumar Do you mean the Canadian government rejecting you on the basis of work experience or any given employer in Canada rejecting you? The first should be asked to an immigration lawyer, the second will be very much company-dependent, but I doubt either, especially not employers, would discount paid industry work prior to graduation (I say industry work because e.g. waiting tables in high school probably won't count for that much). – Dukeling Jul 24 '17 at 13:35

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