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When should I put blog links, or links to public profiles such as LinkedIn, StackOverflow (or other SE sites), Facebook, Twitter, etc on my resume?

Or is this a bad idea entirely that will make my resume look unprofessional?

  • LinkedIn and Stack Overflow are not social networks, they might have some social features but their main purpose is quite different from a social network, so the answer will be different for them than Twitter and Facebook. Also, whether it's a good practice or not will depend on the industry and the type of job you are looking for, and without that information this isn't really answerable. Please read the FAQ for more details on how to form your questions. – yannis Apr 25 '12 at 6:25
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    LinkedIn is. It's strap line is "the worlds largest Professional network". I do agree with your comment about the scope of the question though – Tom Squires Apr 25 '12 at 6:41
  • @Tom Professional != social. – yannis Apr 25 '12 at 7:03
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    @YannisRizos I don't disagree with the sentiment, but have you seen some of the junk on LinkedIn? It's a stretch to call it professional, and some of the peer-recommendation cliques are decidedly (high school) social... – voretaq7 Apr 25 '12 at 7:43
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    LinkedIn has some nice "badges" for exactly this purpose: linkedin.com/profile/profile-badges It doesn't hurt to put one on your resume and is useful for folks who might not have very distinct names. – Angelo Apr 25 '12 at 16:23
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Professional sites

References like LinkedIn and other such sites are actually good to put. HR can also make independent reference checks, people see recommendations (which generally cannot be put in the resume) etc. However, this can backfire if you have made gross incorrect mis-representations in these profiles and there is a gap between the profile and the resume.

Stack Exchange (I guess there are no similar)

This could be good. Specially if someone really knows about the concepts here. If recruiter goes through your questions or answers it might help make judgement about your ability; something resume cannot make it explicit.

Personal sites, blogging etc.

Here a recruiter will be interested depending on the content. For example, if you are a programmer, and if you are blogging about programming it helps me understand your depth. But if the blog is about social issue, from your blog one can make out your thoughts. In some professions it might be relevant but not others. It really depends only on the content when it is really meaningful.

Facebook, Twitter

Usually this is very personal. As a recruiter I really won't bother about last summer's party pics on Facebook. Or what is on your #now-playing-list on Twitter. There is nothing much I get here. So no big deal.

In general, all this help on the resume. But definitely doesn't harm unless you are too uncomfortable with privacy loss.

Remember in all cases, once it attracts you to interview or other evaluation process, much of this is really makes no big deal after that.

  • You missed GitHub and friends. Technical interviewers really enjoy going through your repos and seeing your work, what you commit, and how you commit. In every interview that included my GitHub I got feedback from it. I've had some comment they loved to see the Bash scripting; and others comment on the clean and simple C/C++ code. I had one comment during an Amazon interview that I spend too much time on Doxygen source code documentation. Another at Amazon said I spend too much time on test cases. – jww Oct 13 '18 at 9:43
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Only include anything on your CV if it adds value and shows competency in the field your working in. So for example as an engineer your blog about Algerian cat breeding wouldn't add value and shouldn't be included but a blog about engines would.

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