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One of the first questions the HR of your potentially new workplace asks is how much you make currently, then add 30% and this becomes the salary you're looking at at your new place. I didn't know this on my first job and asked for something which is less than industry average by exactly 30%, coincidentally.

Soon I may be be negotiating salary with my potentially new employer and I would like to be able to negotiate a salary that's based on the actual value for that position rather than what I make currently.

What's the best way to approach such a situation?

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    "One of the first questions the HR of your potentially new workplace asks is how much you make currently, then add 30% and this becomes the salary you're looking at at your new place." - yeah, nah - it doesn't work like that at all - any company will pay you the lowest they think they can get away with - some companies might offer market rates (because they know that is a good retention policy), but others would add only an extra $1,000 or 5% to your current salary if they can get away with it. – HorusKol Jul 31 '17 at 4:54
  • Be cautious with your maths. X + 30% = Y doesn't mean that Y - 30% = X. If your current salary is 30% less than industry average, you won't get industry average by asking for [current salary] + 30%. – BlindSp0t Aug 1 '17 at 14:35
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Soon I may be be negotiating salary with my potentially new employer and I would like to be able to negotiate a salary that's based on the actual value for that position rather than what I make currently.

What's the best way to approach such a situation?

By stating what salary range you want for the new job instead of telling them what you currently earn.

If they ask what you currently earn, tell them that that is irrelevant to the negotiation and restate what your acceptable range is.

Also, make sure you research adequately for what the market is asking for.

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    Incidentally, one of the many reasons for this approach is that it's notoriously difficult to get large rises in pay while staying at the same company, without either party becoming unhappy in the process. The company often feels they are now paying you more than they have to since you used to do X for salary Y and now you're asking for Y+Z, so they try to gain some of that back by demanding more from you in return. Many companies will remain convinced that they can find someone to do the job for the original salary, regardless of what the actual market value is or the size of the gap. – Cronax Jul 31 '17 at 10:01

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