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I recently was contacted by a recruiter to interview for a position at a company. This position is to help build and expand a new team/offering at the company.

When I went to do research on their website, I noticed that the webpage pertaining to this new service was "Under construction" - which is understandable as it is a new team. When I was interviewing with a member of the team, the topic about how new the team/offering is to the company came about - and I jokingly said it must be really new since the webpage is still under construction.

The interviewer said that the webpage is scheduled to launch in a few days (in a laughing matter) and I made a mental note to check it out when it launches. The interview went well and I was asked to send some sample work.

Tonight, as I was typing up my email to send over some sample work, I made my way over to the website and indeed, the web page was up. However, there are flaws - links don't work, graphics are distorted, etc.

Is this something I should mention as a "PS" in my email? My original plan was to compliment on how well the web page looks, but in all honesty, that would be a lie.

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    I cannot exactly see the problem here, as the two tasks are completely unrelated. My advise is to just send the email, focusing with the required. – Malcolm Salvador Aug 1 '17 at 3:41
  • @AConcernedProgrammer My hope was to show that I am interested and therefore am being proactive about doing my research on the team throughout the process. – Michael Aug 1 '17 at 3:44
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    It's a good idea as long as you have something positive to say. It'll probably be OK once you're a part of the team (if it happens), but for now you're not a colleague of theirs and it might sound like you're not minding your business, even if you're honestly trying to help. Avoid associating yourself with negative feedback for as long as you're a candidate. – Sheldonator Aug 1 '17 at 6:55
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    If the website just launched, but there are a number of obvious issues, it's not unreasonable that they already know about them, or will find out soon regardless (being buggy at launch has been known to happen, because either people consider it "good enough" to not delay launching or there wasn't proper testing). – Dukeling Aug 1 '17 at 7:32
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    @Lilienthal Thanks for that. Definitely will utilize those resources! – Michael Aug 1 '17 at 19:11
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Short answer: Leave it for now, it's not really helpful in the recruitment phase and might come across as a little smug.

I'd leave it alone at this stage. They're probably already aware of the issues and are trying to fix it before anyone (appropriately important) notices. If it's still broken, you can then note it in passing next time you communicate with them in a day or two. That way if they weren't aware they will have been told, but have had time to fix anything they did know about :)

if you really must mention it, just say something like:

I saw the new website is up! It looks good, I see you're just working through a few teething issues. Should be great when it's done.

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    +1 smug : yeah the latter part of the question does feel like that. Go and focus on the task on hand instead – Malcolm Salvador Aug 1 '17 at 5:20
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No. Don't mention it. It might steal the focus from your sample work in a negative way. Stay on topic.

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Tonight, as I was typing up my email to send over some sample work, I made my way over to the website and indeed, the web page was up. However, there are flaws - links don't work, graphics are distorted, etc.

Is this something I should mention as a "PS" in my email? My original plan was to compliment on how well the web page looks, but in all honesty, that would be a lie.

No, don't bring it up.

First, and most importantly, you don't know how your interviewer will react to your "constructive criticism". You run the risk of being perceived as a "know-it-all" or "holier than thou" type.

Second, you don't know if the website is really "production ready" yet. While it may be live to the world, it might not yet be complete. (Once you get the job, you can talk with them about a better process of going live, but not until then).

Third, you don't really know their requirements for the site. Of course nobody wants broken links and distorted graphics, but you might end up criticizing something else that is considered useful.

Finally, doing so will take their attention away from you. That's not something you want at this stage of the interview process.

Hold your thoughts until you are specifically asked, or until you are employed.

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If you want to be tact about it, you could say something like this:

I saw the new website and I think it looks good. I've had some thoughts about what we could include on the page for the new team/offering and would like to have the chance to discuss them with you.

They probably don't want to be told that their website looks bad, but they may be happy to know their potential new hire is already considering ways she can help the company.

  • I thought the same, if you want to mention it (which is unnecessary IMHO), don't point out flaws but rather congratulate them on going live, and maybe say you have ideas, not more. – CodeMonkey Aug 1 '17 at 11:09

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