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I just started a software development internship and I'm working on two really fun projects. Project A is self assigned to help me learn a new language and environment, and B is the same thing but a manager recently added some additional requirements.

I had to go home early today to make sure I didn't go over my hours and I was really disappointed because I was on a roll with project A. If I wait until after the weekend to continue A I may not get a chance to work on It for a while because I'll be expected to make a lot of progress on B. I have plans to eventually combine the two projects.

I have no big plans this weekend and want to work on project A, but I'm already at the max hours I can work, so I want to just work on it and not clock my hours. On one hand I don't think it would be a big deal even if it was obvious I worked from home because who cares what I do in my free time? On the other hand I had a previous (retail) job where I was told that working off the clock was a fireable offense.

I know I'm probably overthinking this, but regardless if it is allowed or not why would it not be allowed? Is there any reason why I shouldn't just risk it now and ask permission when I get back on Monday?

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    VTC - Ask your supervisor. This is very company-specific. Aug 5, 2017 at 3:06
  • @Wesley long I'll edit the question to make more clear what I am asking Aug 5, 2017 at 3:15
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    OK, but you are asking for a judgment on your company's policy, which you don't even know. Ask your supervisor. It's their job to know the answer. Ask your manager. It's their job to implement the policy. Ask your director. It's their job to define the policy. Asking TWP is not going to get you the answer you need. Aug 5, 2017 at 3:17
  • @wesley long I just edited it. I'm not asking about my company's policy. If they were open now I'd just ask but I can't so, I'm pretty much asking what the point of a policy like that would be. Like I can see what would be wrong in a retail setting, but I don't know if there is something wrong that I'm not thinking of. Aug 5, 2017 at 3:21
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    Depending on the where you live, you might get your employer in trouble. For example, a non-exempt employee in the US working unpaid overtime would be a problem for the employer. Aug 5, 2017 at 3:24

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regardless if it is allowed or not why would it not be allowed?

If it's not allowed, you shouldn't do it.

Is there any reason why I shouldn't just risk it now and ask permission when I get back on Monday?

Yes, they could be sued for making employees work for hours that they aren't being paid for, and if in the legal process, they discover that employees do this, they could be required to make a large payout. However, some employers' business models include having workers spend personal time on infrastructure or tangentially related projects.

I can't tell you to do something illegal or that would hurt your employer. However, I can give you a quote from my coworker when I asked him a similar question. "It's better to ask forgiveness than permission."

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