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This question already has an answer here:

My own situation here is a little specific of course, but I'll try and ask this to where it can be generalized for the benefit of others. I didn't see a question quite like this, but let me know if I missed one. :)

I've applied to work for a very small company online using their ticketing system (where they request job applications go). They're totally remote, no physical location or phone number to call. This is the only way to apply to work with them.

I sent my application in a little over a year ago, got the usual copy-paste response that they're small and don't hire often, but that they'll keep my application for review for when a position opens. Since I used their ticketing system and kept their first response, I can reply to it to update my ticket. A month or two after my initial application, I replied to it to add some additional documentation to the application (which, of course, resulted in the same response as before).

So it's been nearly a year since that update to my application with them. Since then, several things have changed. I have a lot of new experiences and did a couple projects that would be beneficial to add to my application. Plus, a reference I used in my application parted ways with my current workplace in a...negative manner. I'd love to work with this new company, so I was getting antsy to update my application with these new things (ESPECIALLY to replace the bad reference).

But my question is, is this just going to pester the folks behind the company's ticketing system and make me seem like an annoyance? In the past when I was physically attending businesses to apply to work with them, I was discouraged from going back to the business and checking up with them repeatedly because it could make me seem pushy.

So, in short, is it frowned upon to keep updating a company with new experiences or projects you've added to your resume? If not, how much time is "enough time" to wait before you send updates? How do you do this without annoying the company?

I have work and am still finishing up college - I don't "need" a job with this company. But I really, really want it, and I want to show that I really want it without seeming "pushy." I want to be able to show my continuing interest, even though a year has passed and a position hasn't opened up yet.

marked as duplicate by Dukeling, gnat, Mister Positive, Community Aug 14 '17 at 16:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Things could have changed in a year; the details of the position may have changed, your experience may have changed. Why not just send a new application and mention you've applied before? – Brandin Aug 14 '17 at 13:57
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  • Thanks for the links - these and the answers I did get are all just what I needed! – Hodag Aug 14 '17 at 16:56
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Well it risks coming across as a bit desperate or stalker-ish. The chances that you will stand out in a bad way outweigh the possibilities the other way. So, no I wouldn't keep sending them updates, if you see they have posted a job that you'd be interested in then apply with your latest information etc. Otherwise I'd just move on for now - you say you've already got work so you're better off focusing on that and your studies for now.

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Short answer: It depends on the person reading your information, but nothing ventured, nothing gained.

Longer answer:

It has been my experience that persistence pays off. Updating them every few months is not excessive. In most cases someone will see your activity and say:

Wow, this person really wants to work here.

If you really want to work for this company, continue to update your application every few months.

Heres why:

  1. It shows that you really are interested in the company
  2. It bumps your application up to the top of the pile
  3. Someone is going to notice that your name keeps popping up to the top of the pile
  4. It will generate some curiosity on the part of the reviewer.

In addition to updating your application, I would suggest that you reach out through your network of family and friends and see if they can find anyone who works for this company. If you can find someone, set up an "informational interview".

What you do with an informational interview is sit down with someone who works for the company. You are not asking for a job, but you express your interest for the company and ask that person all about it. You explain why you are interested and ask for more information on the company.

Naturally, this is also a way to back-door your application because chances are, if the person likes you, he or she will contact someone and say "Take a closer look at Hodag's application".

Good luck

  • This may be true, but based on the description, I suspect that the process to complete or update an application is completely automated, and nobody is reviewing applications unless they have a job opening. Worst case scenario, no one is bothered by frequent updates, and the application is current if and when they do review it. – Kat Aug 14 '17 at 15:03
  • @Kat I've had people get back to me after a year+ Sometimes things just get lost in the system. It's strange out there. – Richard U Aug 14 '17 at 15:37
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My opinion is that as long as you're not updating it frequently, e.g. once a month, then it won't be seen as too pushy. This does, of course, depend on who is on the opposite end, noticing the updates. Some people will think it's a bit much, other will not, that's why moderation is key.

If it's been a year since the last update then yes, definitely update it without worring that you're updating too often. One could argue that a year apart isn't often enough to post updates, as most people would have forgotten about it after a year, so the fact that 12 months later you're adding things is like you're fawning after it and can't let go.

It would show that you're enthusiastic and keen on a role and working for the company, but it's also important to get the right amount of time between updates. Not too frequently, but don't leave it too long.

Significant updates every few months is ideal, but don't get hung up on it. There is not point waiting an indefinite amount of time for a position, often it's best to just look elsewhere.

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