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I'm an italian guy, 32 years old, currently working as an ERP programmer on Microsoft MFC based stuff (basically the most unexciting job ever).

I'm trying to improve my portfolio/Github in order to have something presentable during a job interview.

I'd like to change country/job (front end web dev or app developer would be cool). I also develop simple games/demos in my spare time (Unity/UE) and put them on Github and itch.io.

Should I remove them? In my country when I last interview I got treated like an fool every time I mentioned I program games. (Like the interview having that attitude like saying that stuff like "in our company we make important software non useless stuff like games). Every time I got pretty disheartened to be honest.

What about the rest of Europe/USA/World? Do you think games detrimental in a programer portfolio?

closed as primarily opinion-based by Dukeling, gnat, Rory Alsop, HorusKol, scaaahu Aug 20 '17 at 3:13

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    In the US, or at least at places I've worked, having done personal projects in your free time is generally regarded as a good thing, no matter what those projects are. Having that code available to potential employers should help them get an idea of your skill level even though it might not be 'important' . I have to caveat that by saying that the one time a prospective hire showed us his Unity game, the code was so simple and Unity-specific that it didn't help to pad his resume much. – Egg Aug 19 '17 at 21:35
  • Keep the games - and either apply to a games development company, or add some non game projects related to the industry you are trying to get into or advance within – HorusKol Aug 19 '17 at 22:43
  • currently working as an ERP programmer on Microsoft MFC based stuff (basically the most unexciting job ever) That attitude is not good. A friend of mine had a job that consisted entirely of counting (by hand) holes in bits of paper. You have no idea what boring is. In any case your current job counts more than the games unless you're aiming to work on games professionally. If you want web or app work then you need those things on your portfolio. – StephenG Aug 20 '17 at 0:23
  • Hey Sam - in the US, game programmers make the most $ and games are the key in your folio. But there's a great difference between hobbyist games, and saying "I led game X which made $2m". I believe you face two different problems. (A) the games in your folio, are they a bit "hobbyist" / "amateurish" ? (B) in answer to your specific question on Italy/USA differences, yeah, I can see that in a country like Italy or Germany that makes all the world's incredible engineering, it would get less respect; the USA makes hollywood, tv and social medias, not engineering, so it's different. – Fattie Aug 20 '17 at 12:38
  • "when I last interview I got treated like an fool" - If this happens, just stop mentioning it to that interviewer/company. It doesn't mean the next place will think the games are foolish. – Brandin Aug 21 '17 at 6:01
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If it shows your enthusiasm for software development and demonstrates that you can write clean code, keep it. Be happy when a firm doesn't hire you because they didn't think games were good portfolio projects. They aren't the kinds of places you want to work if you're moving because your current position is uninteresting.

My employer builds enterprise software, several of us program games in our free time. Some of us come right out of game development. We recognize good code when we see it, regardless of the application.

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