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The air conditioning in the office I work at makes me feel sick and leads to colds. Even if I put some more clothes on my throat gets itchy and start to sneeze.

My coworkers are wearing tshirts and I'm the only one with a jacket. They don't like it when I turn it off.

I got my blood tested just in case there was something wrong with my immune system but everything came out OK.

What should I do?

marked as duplicate by Chris E, Dukeling, Mister Positive, DarkCygnus, Richard Says Reinstate Monica Sep 14 '17 at 18:24

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  • 3
    Ask if you can relocate to a warmer part of the office? – Frank FYC Sep 14 '17 at 17:56
  • 1
    Wear a scarf, dude. It looks camp, but sometimes that's what it takes. The only alternative is to either make the company or your coworkers aggravated. This is chiefly your problem, and you have to make the solution. – Stian Yttervik Sep 14 '17 at 18:09
  • You might want to check / measure the actual temperature and see if you can find any regulation on what optimal / acceptable offices temperatures should be. If it's outside of typical ranges, or there's a legal requirement to be within a certain range, you might have a much easier time convincing someone to turn it off or change the temperature. Have you spoken to your boss about this? Because that should be the first thing you do. – Dukeling Sep 14 '17 at 18:10
  • 1
    Also relevant - How can I convince my boss to turn on air conditioning? – Dukeling Sep 14 '17 at 18:18
  • @Dukeling if you are the only one in the office to complain about it, thats not a smart career move though. Doubly so if you involve unions or invoke rules and regulations. Just sayin. – Stian Yttervik Sep 14 '17 at 18:48
2

Request vents near you turned to not point towards you or close the ones on your side. It sounds like it's blowing towards you and you are getting colds. If it's literally the temperature then you can get permission for a floor heater to put near you, so that your little area is warmer but the rest can stay cool.

  • @JoeStrazzere No, but body temperature shifts causes one to be more susceptible to sickness, thus cold air affecting one more so than others makes that individual more susceptible. If you want to go with your statement you would have to say "eliminate germs and live in a bubble". The person is stating the cold and sickness are related from OP experience thus implying a weakened immune response due to temperature. – mutt Sep 16 '17 at 1:57

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