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I am currently a Massage Therapist. Last year I had some health issues pop up that the doctor said were on a "watch" list and that if they progressed, we would look at treatment. Because the doctor indicated they were not at a stage requiring treatment, I did not tell my employer(s) at the time.

In the meantime, I began pursuing a master's degree in anticipation of returning to the workforce in a less physical role. I have 3 months left until I graduate. Recently, however, I believe my health issues have progressed and am awaiting some tests to confirm.

I am booked up through the end of October and plan to honor those commitments, but when should I tell my employer and the salon I work out of privately (as well as those clients)? Should I provide information on why? I would possibly like to find employment within the resort I work out of, so I don't necessarily want them knowing that I have health issues.

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    This depends on the time you agreed on your contract for you to give notice. Usually is a 2 week period but depends. Also no need to provide all the details, just explain what is necessary. – DarkCygnus Sep 14 '17 at 18:21
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    What is the most important factors for you in making the timing decision? I personally would keep the health issues to myself and just say moving on with my career regardless of what is decided on timing. – IDrinkandIKnowThings Sep 14 '17 at 18:31
  • The health concerns aren't really something you need to share with anyone. – Mister Positive Sep 14 '17 at 18:54
  • You might be subject to disability insurance. Check on what benefits, if any, your employer has for that. – Glen Pierce Sep 14 '17 at 21:18
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If you are able to fulfill your work commitments and move to another place and fulfill those commitments without health issues getting in the way or required to be disclosed due to working contracts then there is no need to tell them anything about the health issues. If the health issues impact your ability to perform your job in your current work or future work then the time to let them know is when it becomes an issue for you working in the current role to perform your job responsibilities.

Based on what you posted you are fully able to do your job now and will be transitioning to another role soon which you will be fully able to perform. If that is the case just indicate you no longer wish to do the massage therapy part but wish to utilize the skills from your degree and progress that way. Request another position in the company and turn it into a transfer instead of a quit if possible, otherwise arrange the new job and turn in your notice, but avoid taking on more commitments past the date you wish to resign.

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but when should I tell my employer and the salon I work out of privately (as well as those clients)?

That depends on how far in advance your services are booked.

If you are booking more than 3 months in advance, then you should tell your employer now.

Should I provide information on why?

It's hard to tell what you are planning to say to your employer.

If you intend to tell them that you will be going to school full time, then you don't need to embellish on that. But if your reason for leaving is to deal with health issues, then it makes sense to talk about that. You can also tell them that you hope to be better in the future and be able to work in another role.

In general you don't ever need to provide a reason for leaving, just a date. But in some contexts you will be viewed as odd or flighty, and your ability to find new employment at this company would be diminished.

  • Note that if the contract says a 2-week notice but the OP is "booked" 3 months in advance, it's (in theory) not the OP's business. I agree that the OP should inform the management longer in advance, but this is really just of good relationships and not of contractual requirements. – yo' Sep 15 '17 at 22:46

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