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I work part-time (2.5 days a week) as a secretary for a small software company in Northern Ireland. Recently, I’ve been asked to work an extra two half days a week (3.5 days per week) to act in a different capacity as a sales administrator.

This extra work has only accepted on a verbal basis – there is nothing in writing, and no changes have been made to my contract. Is there are point at which extra hours are considered overtime, or are you entitled to additional leave?

closed as off-topic by gnat, Snow, Erik, scaaahu, Dukeling Sep 22 '17 at 12:09

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    You need to ask the person who asked you to work an extra two half days a week this question. Don't take anything verbally. Ask the person to send you an e-mail to explain the compensation for the extra work. – scaaahu Sep 22 '17 at 9:41
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    If NI also has a Citizen's Advice Bureau like the rest of the UK, you should talk to them. You should at least get paid the extra hours at your regular rate - I'm not sure how overtime rules work with part-time work in the UK. – HorusKol Sep 22 '17 at 10:30
  • How do you handle hours reporting right now? Do you have a time clock, a time reporting sheet, etc.? Did you ask your boss "where should I report the extra time" or something similar? – Brandin Sep 22 '17 at 10:44
  • Thanks for your comments. I've decided the best course of action is to go with Snark Shark and HorusKol's suggestion and contact Citizen's Advice Bureau. As for hours reporting, there's nothing formal in place. My contract just states the days, start and end time I'm expected to work. – user77245 Sep 22 '17 at 15:05
  • @nelb You may find that you're referred to HMRC. I've added a couple of links into my answer below. See how you go with those. You may need to contact Acas for advice as well. – Snow Sep 22 '17 at 15:10
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Ask your HR department. They'll be able to define to your what constitutes overtime as regards to your contract and role.

This might also depend on how long these change in hours are likely to last.

See links on the gov.uk web site:

Overtime Rights
and
Pay and work rights helpline

  • Unfortunately, being a small company, there is no HR department, just the boss. It sounds like you're say there is no overarching legal duty imposed on employers that defines a set limit on what is and is not considered overtime? – user77245 Sep 22 '17 at 8:29
  • It sounds as though you'll need to consult with an external regulatory body (armed with your contract) to see how this affects your statutory rights as an employee. – Snow Sep 22 '17 at 8:34
  • @nelb yes but only for hours out side of the normal working week aka 9-5 you come across like your trying to scam your employer – Neuromancer Sep 22 '17 at 15:22