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I am a software developer at a small company, 4 people in total. When I started to work there, one and a half year ago approximately, I entered as a intern, with intern duties and an intern pay, as the time passed, I started to grow within the company, my duties and responsibilities started to grow as well, but the amount that I earn is almost the same, except for a raise that I got some months ago. I made numerous projects for the company, started to learn Android programming from scratch and made a number of apps, of those, one is an app we offer to our clients that already have our desktop solution and ask for a considerable amount for it, the payment is monthly and when I made that app I was promised 50% of that money, the app is up and running in more than 40 devices and guess what: never saw a penny of it. Within one year, my internship contract expired and I didn't made a new one, so, I don't have any bonds to the company whatsoever. The big advantage of working there is that I don't have fixed hours, as my college's classes are all in the morning, I work only on the afternoon for 5 or 4 hours a day and still make the same amount. I can take pretty much any day off as long as I have a good reason to do so or leave early if needed (I've worked in other places before with fixed hours, and I know this isn't an easy task).

So, the big question is: should I demand/ask for a formal contract or something like that (and maybe a raise, since I am still making almost the same as when I started as a intern) and for the compensation I was promised for making the app in the first place? My boss is a real nice guy, I feel extremely free to do anything in the office, new projects I come up with, discussing ideas, telling jokes, is a real nice place to work, I don't want to risk losing any perks for pushing things too far.

*Edit: I don't know if the background (country) is really important, but for the record: I'm uneasy about the formal arrangement and contracts of work because I know my boss is against bureaucracy and my country is world famous for it's bureaucracy, I'm in a comfortable position at the moment, I fear that demanding a formal arrangement from him could put me in a bad position, something along the lines that I'm not as comfortable with his word as I was before.

closed as off-topic by Daniel, IDrinkandIKnowThings, JasonJ, DarkCygnus, Rory Alsop Sep 26 '17 at 17:52

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for advice on a specific choice, such as what job to take or what skills to learn, are difficult to answer objectively and are rarely useful for anyone else. Instead of asking which decision to make, try asking how to make the decision, or for more specific details about one element of the decision. (More information)" – Daniel, IDrinkandIKnowThings, JasonJ, DarkCygnus
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  • What exactly is the problem you are having? Is it just the pay and not getting anything from app-sales, or is there another reason you want a contract? (I mean; it's almost always good to have a contract, but we'd like to tailor the advice to the question and it's not entirely clear to me why you want the contract.) – Erik Sep 26 '17 at 12:22
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    You should ALWAYS have a formal contract in place. That will protect you against employers who promise bonuses / profit shares and then don't deliver. – user34587 Sep 26 '17 at 12:25
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    Important Life Lesson: "Verbal contracts are only worth the paper they're written on" – Kaz Sep 26 '17 at 12:33
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    The question is in the title. Should or not ask for a formal contract of work and compensation for the work I did? – UnluckyFellow Sep 26 '17 at 13:21
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    Also, country does matter, because depending on the legal system there may be rules that apply, like minimum wage, income tax registration and black labor prevention laws etc. which may have an impact on your situation. – Daniel Sep 26 '17 at 13:26
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So, the big question is: should I demand/ask for a formal contract or something like that (and maybe a raise, since I am still making almost the same as when I started as a intern) and for the compensation I was promised for making the app in the first place?

Ask for whatever you want. If you don't ask, you won't get.

You have to decide if the risk of asking equates to "pushing too far" or not. You'll have to decide that based on your knowledge of the company and manager.

And based on your comment of "guess what: never saw a penny of it" you have to decide if this is the kind of company you want to work for or not.

A raise seems extremely reasonable (I expect all interns to get more when they are signed on as permanent employees), payment for a past "promise" is a bit more iffy. You may have to have a long discussion about what that "promise" actually meant. Clearly, since you aren't receiving anything yet, there is a difference of opinion here.

You really aren't in a position to demand anything. You can threaten walking out if you don't get what you want. Only you are in a position to judge if this would be likely to be effective or not.

If you are granted anything, make sure you get it in writing this time, rather than just a "promise". That way, you'll avoid issues like the ones you are experiencing now.

  • +1 for You really aren't in a position to demand anything. The OP says they're on good terms with the boss, so making demands could jeopardise that. It would be a better idea to arrange a meeting with the boss to discuss the status of employment in a civil and calm manner, and take it from there. – Longisland Sep 26 '17 at 13:11
  • Exactly. I can and will do that for the compensations part of the problem. I'm just uneasy about the formal arrangement of work and that stuff. – UnluckyFellow Sep 26 '17 at 13:15
  • Just because you never got a payment from the promise does not necessarily mean the boss does not honor it. Did you ever ask and got denied the payment? Could just be that the boss thinks about yearly payment, or waiting for invoice etc. – Daniel Sep 26 '17 at 13:21
  • @UnluckyFellow: Which is why I suggested you should have the meeting to discuss your employment status based on this: "my internship contract expired and I didn't made a new one, so, I don't have any bonds to the company whatsoever". That way you can professionally bring attention to the promises that were made and discuss your future at that workplace; most importantly, getting an updated contract if you stay there. – Longisland Sep 26 '17 at 13:52

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