-1

Background: I have been a software, database, and integration developer with 12 years experience, working at my current company for 4 years now. Here, I have done hands-on development, architecture, bug fixes, and even some business analysis - and I for the first 2.5 years LOVED working here.

1.5 years ago, I got moved over to this behemoth project that has been primarily worked on by an outside vendor (body shop, really, but one of the better ones) with mostly offshore development and some onsite architect/PM people. Over this time I have been responsible for "making sure this project is successful", whatever that means. The architects, developers, and BA's at the vendor side are extremely stubborn, even if otherwise competent, and steamroll any recommendations by me by declaring me as a "blocker" or "risk" to other project management contractors. I haven't coded anything that has made it to production in over 2 years now.

Funny thing is, the hours for me are a cushy 8:30 - 5, and I still get my nice vacations/perks/etc and am apparently doing well in yearly reviews.

Something just doesn't seem right though. I didn't spend years getting good at being a consulting vendor broker and offshore babysitter. Is there any viable skill that can come out of this, if the vendors even ever go away?

**edit: To address comments, my title is "Sr. Software Engineer" **

closed as off-topic by motosubatsu, gnat, Draken, Dukeling, Chris E Sep 26 '17 at 15:09

  • This question does not appear to be about the workplace within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    You have a 2nd question buried in there - "How do I avoid getting steamrollered by hostile vendors?" You might want to ask that as a separate question. – Dan Pichelman Sep 26 '17 at 13:41
4

Over this time I have been responsible for "making sure this project is successful", whatever that means

Congratulations. It means your bosses trust your judgment and have given you more responsibility than a typical developer.

You have a new role now, and in your new role "success" is not defined by getting your code into production or fixing bugs. It's defined by making sure that the behemoth project is a success.

Is there any viable skill that can come out of this, if the vendors even ever go away?

YES. It's called "people skills", or "management skills". You may look down on it as "babysitting", but your bosses see it as "leveraging existing resources to achieve a goal that could not possibly be accomplished by a single individual, no matter how skilled".

If you get good at it you'll find yourself well rewarded.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.