210

I'm going to take a completely different tack than the existing answers. I'm going to ask you to take a step back and think about whether it's a good idea to cut Bob off. Consider that Bob may still be talking because he thinks you don't understand as well as you think you do. I find it really frustrating when I'm trying to explain something to someone and ...


198

I think the crux of the situation is: There is no template even though my boss asked her to provide one. Next time she stops by, beat her to the punch and insist that you need the template to do your job before she even asks for the next iteration of request. When she derails the conversation with specifics of what she wants wholeheartedly agree that ...


136

As this is about politeness, manners, and social conventions, details will differ a lot depending on: the social context (such as workplace conventions) the person you are talking to yourself, and what you feel comfortable with That said, I think there is nothing wrong with politely saying that you have enough information. Something like Thank you, you ...


130

An interview is a two way street. They checked you out. You checked them out. It seems their normal day to day operations is doing their jobs in environments full of distractions. I would not want to work there. You probably don't want that either. Good thing you had this interview, so you can put that application away and focus on the other ones. It might ...


113

You are telling Bob that you understand and he doesn't seem to be processing that. Try showing him that you understand. I use this technique a lot -- not so much to shut down a rambling explanation but for verification, but I think it would work there. Bob: blah blah blah. You: Ok, so let me see if I understand -- you're saying I need to frob the ...


72

When she talks to me my anxiety goes through the roof. I have to use controlled breathing while imagining murdering her in a variety of ways. This is bad. You should be discussing this part with a mental health professional. They can advise strategies and/or medication to help you cope with your anxiety, since you find it so severe. What do I do ...


55

My strategy for this is whenever possible go to Bob's desk to ask the question and don't sit down. If you are standing and in his space you will have a much easier time disengaging. Nod when he makes an appropriate point and start leaving while saying "thank you for your help".


53

I have been to a lot of job interviews in my life. Sometimes the interviewers said weird things during the interview, and sometimes the interviewers had not read my CV beforehand. However, never was I denied the common courtesy of being interviewed in a quiet room with only me and the interviewers present. To deny you such a thing, I think, is just flat out ...


35

This is one reason why project management and collaboration tools exist. Try to make use of one, if not using already. This will have the status visibility, without the explicit need to face to face meeting or e-mailing. Also, this should contain the requirements and acceptance criterion in writing, so no need to repeat them over. Obviously, this does not ...


33

You answered your own question. Set up a daily 15 or 30 minute call, include your boss, and provide the update at this time. This should save you the unplanned interruptions throughout your day. If it doesn't, have your boss speak to him about the interruptions. These unplanned interruptions are expensive against your productivity.


33

You've implemented a new and unfamiliar application to the team with no training what so ever. To make matters worse you re-enforced his behavior/improper Teams etiquette by actually responding to the questions that are posted in the group. While the concept of channels and groups may be second nature to you it's obviously not for your co-worker. Perhaps a ...


32

Turn the lights off when you leave the office, and on when you get back. That way, people who want to save the environment, or save their employer money, will not be tempted to disturb your office.


21

What do I do? Turn your office lights back on as soon as you return. Your lights do you absolutely no good when you aren't there.


19

"But its only a pound, surely you can afford a pound" When I was a teen, I used that same reasoning to a teacher, and she pointed out that she supported a lot of other causes too, and that money added up. That is a completely rational argument, and if someone pushes back on that, it is them being rude. So, simply point out that you support other causes ...


18

Having an interview in an unusual setting is not necessarily a bad thing. I landed one of my most fulfilling jobs through an interview ad-lib conducted in public. I was scheduled for a job interview at a school in a foreign country. Travel arrangements were made. At my arrival and due to unforeseen circumstances, the headmaster was unable to conduct the ...


15

Don't! Unless the explaining is taking up your time when you absolutely have to get back to something else, then curtailing Bob's explanations is foolish, especially if you're only doing it because you don't particularly happen to like hearing the explanation or if you feel cocksure you understand it and don't need more explanation. The reason this is ...


15

As a "Bob" who probably does this once in a while, I can tell you what I'm looking for: understanding. The goal of me spending all this time teaching you stuff is so that I (hopefully) don't have to do it again. If you can show me that you understand what I'm explaining, then I know I've done my job. One great way of doing this is proving a summary of the ...


15

Ask your Manager if you could make a simple guide for him as to what channel to ask for what etc. And ask your Manager to give a gentle reminder to him if your suggestion/reminder is ignored by him.


14

She is keeping me from advancing to other more important projects. That should be important to the organization's leadership. So, you will hopefully have your manager's support when you set a firm deadline beyond which further edits cannot be made. Here's an example. "I am unable to make any additional changes to this document after [insert the day of your ...


13

Especially in open plan offices, it's a common courtesy to turn off your sound, or use headphones if you do need/want sound. (edit: AFAIK this is not culture specific, but I may be wrong) This means that it's not inappropriate to courteously ask if your colleague can turn off their sound. Explain that the sound is distracting to you. If they have a ...


13

It is not related to saving electricity because if it was, there'd be a company-wide message, and someone would come and address me directly. It is not related to a formal corporate electricity-saving initiative. It could easily just be someone with an interest in saving electricity. And it may not have been intentional or part of a plot. My father ...


12

What do I do? Do I just tell them to stop calling and take me off their list? Yes, that's exactly what you do with someone when you no longer want them to call.


10

There might be a reason for a stakeholder to constantly nag you. There is a department depending on your work and your stakeholder assumes that it is worth his time to go and check up on you every day, just to make sure there is progress. From the perspective of the stakeholder the ideal situation would be different: He would come to you and agree with you ...


9

How do I deal with a coworker that keeps asking to make small superficial changes to a report, and it is seriously triggering my anxiety? Seems that this coworker is (1) not your boss and (2) bypassing the established procedure for the project development (template, given, implement it, repeat). I suggest a two-step approach: First, try to address and ...


9

In a comment, you clarified your goals: I think my goal is to keep lights on in my office. And as a greater goal, have people generally stay out of my office unless they have a business with me, or they are HR, or perhaps my boss or someone directed by them Given your first goal, it seems like there are many things you could try: Shut and lock your door ...


8

No matter how you broach the topic you run the risk of looking miserly and uncharitable. A couple of points to mitigate this are making sure this conversation is a private one with your boss and approach it from the angle of there is uncomfortable peer pressure created which is hurting the workplace atmosphere and perhaps the company can replace this ...


8

It's weird, I see no answer addressing what I feel is the core of the problem so I'm adding my own : What do I do exactly because even I kept a poker face telling her while gritting teeth: "okay I can/will implement those changes" By agreeing each time to the demands of your coworker, you enable her behavior and she'll feel unconsciously encouraged to ...


8

What do I do? I would do nothing but turn the light back on. Most likely it is someone who is eager to save the company money regarding the cost of electricity or they are attempting to do their part for the environment. In either case, it takes no time to just turn the light switch back to the on position. Don't let this little thing mess with your ...


7

I've seen the highest voted answers on here - and regardless of English or American culture, I'm not sure I agree with either of them. The solution to this: Ask a counterquestion. If your colleague won't stop explaining, you need to interrupt him - but not in a rude way. Ask a question that will verify your knowledge on the subject - something that ...


7

Does this reflect badly on the company or individual? Bad here is entirely subjective; that's rather the crux of the issue. You seem to be approaching this from the angle of I didn't like aspects of how they conducted this interview. Should I have expected them to explain or apologise for these aspects? Consider another angle: The interview accurately ...


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