New answers tagged

2

Did anyone from the company warn you not to apply to more than one job? If yes, the you already made a choice. Otherwise, it seems that they do not have a real problem with you applying for more than one job. I would honestly go to both interviews, and choose what is best at the end. What they negotiate internally (IF they discuss anything internally) is ...


-2

It sounds like you might be excited/nervous/stressed out about this new oppertunity. Personally I would just keep going with the first position as you are already doing good (negotiating salary etc). Once you have a foot in the door I am sure it would be easier to move around in the company, if it turns out that is what you truly want.


8

I was a recruiter/resume screener until I moved into operations. Put yes, or else your resume won’t be read. Most of the time the form itself is not read. We have your resume which would tell us if you have a degree, so why do we have the form? So we can auto-reject you based on the details you put there. The form is meant to make life easy for us. All ...


1

One thing you could do is call HR and ask them when they usually have a class of new graduates join their company. It could just be a timing issue. If it's not that, I would suggest you contact the hiring manager directly. Do whatever you have to do to get his contact information. Use LinkedIn, alumni network, multiple cold calls, etc. Tell the hiring ...


-2

EDIT: The mere existence of this massive debate indicates that you should put Yes. It means that if you are challenged on it, confusion is very believable. Put that you currently have one HR does not consist of the best and the brightest. It is mostly filled by people who meandered there because they like people and graduated with a degree in whatever. ...


1

When the recruiters came to my university, several noted that if you were looking for full time positions after graduation, you should put that you have a bachelors degree as you will by the time the position is expected to start. This advice might vary by company, but my two friends who have worked in HR say that you should say you have a degree or else ...


2

I will put "Yes". Resume needs to be truthful but you cannot have a technicality work against you. You simply would have to explain (like you already did in CV) when you are interviewed. It is also possible, someone will take a look at your resume or you are called for the interview only after you graduate and in that case it wont even be a concern.


7

I graduate this semester. How should I answer “do you currently have a bachelor's degree?” Since in fact you do not currently have a degree, the only truthful answer when given only Yes or No choices is "No". If the online application form allows for comments, then you can clarify your answer there. Otherwise, make it clear in your resume when you expect ...


7

Whether you can actually "apply" or not will largely depend on which is the accurate closing date, but since that needs to be determined the steps to take are the same. Compose a polite email to jobs@unops.org (the e-mail address was cunningly hidden on their "contact us" page, gotta watch out for those wily fraudsters and their tricks! The blurb above that ...


0

Referring friends allows you the role of bridge building. You can discuss about the job requirements and work place culture and processes and prepare them. With friends, beside you being able to market their strengths to the hiring manager, you can openly discuss with them about how you view their suitability and how they can prepare to succeed in applying ...


2

Is there anything I can still do to apply for this position? As you've seen the company responsiveness (or lack thereof) at the recruitment phase itself - question is do you really want to go ahead and work for this organization? I can understand this seems like a good opportunity / match for you - but a job is not a one-time stint, you need to ensure you ...


0

In addition to the the points covered in other answers, there can also be regulatory considerations. In the USA, for example, companies that sponsor work visas for foreign employees can get more power and flexibility in the work visa lottery system if they can prove to the government that they only hire foreigners who can do the job at least as well as the ...


-2

Many people without formal training or qualifications are perfectly capable of doing electrical or plumbing jobs. If you have the right aptitudes, you can probably teach yourself to be a midwife or a nurse without going through formal training courses. Yet employers, and the public, tend to demand that people aren't allowed to practice these trades without ...


1

If there was something, “X”, that is easy to lie about and get away with it, you can bet good money that there would be lots of people doing that and lying about X in their resumes. Employers would eventually realize that a lot of job candidates give information about X that is impossible to verify during the hiring process but leads to hiring people who ...


0

If someone is asking for a "Junior" developer, but still expects "Senior" experience, as the detailed description of the position might suggest - they're usually cheap and do not care much about project experience. And there's also corporations, which only accept freshers, in order to train them according to their particular needs. An experienced software ...


-2

It is a simple lazy filter. You should not take it personal. Maybe company decided that instead of receiving 30 CVs (including 10 CVs without BSc) they just want to review 20. And they don't particularly care about hiring the best out of 30 possible candidates, just one good enough from 20 with BSc (and they are willing to ignore 1%(or %5 or 25% or 50%) ...


1

There's a false binary choice here - you can get a job honestly or you can fail to get a job dishonestly in addition to the two possibilities you seem to be considering. Being dishonest is as likely to result in no job as in getting one. The best outcome is to obtain a job honestly - if that means providing additional evidence of what you're good at doing, ...


5

Here are a couple of steps. I don't like the term 'lying', so we'll go with "how do I fluff up my resume and myself so I look more attractive to my potential employers', if that's OK with you. I think credentials matter a bit in this context, so I'll put them in. I'm currently a SE, been working for 5+ years right out of college. I've been deeply involved ...


2

You have some experience which puts you in a better position than some. You must have contributed or learned something in that 6 months of employment. Rather than lying, enumerate that list on your resume and discuss your duties during the interview. Best of luck!


8

How can I enhance my resume to increase my chances to getting another job? I realize I can’t lie about testable stuff, but what is hard to test in an interview? One friend suggested that I talk about micro services and such as they can’t easily test that. As a rule of thumb, I suggest you never lie or include false statements in your Resume. Most likely ...


2

Why would not having a degree instantly disqualify a programmer? And what does this say about the person/company who wrote the application? It doesn't, and in fact it can say something about the company. A lot of answers seem to come from people without actual experience in hiring software developers in the Netherlands which I have been doing for a lot of ...


0

What it really tells you is that the person who wrote the ad is clueless and lives in magical Christmas land. A lot of job ads get posted by HR personnel who don't have any real technical skills. They often just rattle a bunch of keywords that the technical manager has mentioned in passing to them. So, yes you are completely correct in saying that there are ...


1

I don't know if it's the same in The Netherlands, but in the US you should not generally consider the job requirements listed in a job posting as a firm list. Finding a person who has all the qualifications is usually nearly impossible. Think of them more as a wishlist. The hiring manager will list all the desirable qualifications, and hope to bring in ...


1

Having a degree in CS, or having done a technical engineering school, certifies that one person has followed some courses and passed an exam, so a minimal knowledge on the subject should be granted. So the HR has a quick way to cut the number of candidates for a given job. Granted there are people that got a degree by luck and brilliant self taught people.


-1

If this company is an outsourcing company it may be the requirement of their clients. I was once applying to such an outsourcing company which was working in the financial industry. They told me that their client's - Banks - require a degree from developers whom they want to work for them. Also my current employer, an outsourcing company, requires a degree, ...


45

A lot of programmers are self-taught and do not have a degree. A lot of them do have degrees. Self-taught is a phrase that needs to die. Every programmer is "self-taught", formal education or not. It is commonly being used on social media to humble brag, not realising those with degrees are also largely self-taught. Why would not having a degree ...


14

It's helpful to consider your question in the larger context of hiring processes. Typically, hiring processes have multiple stages, which are designed to filter candidates until a single person can be selected. Each step in the process therefore needs a set of criteria on which the filtering can be done. Importantly, each step needs to be designed as a trade-...


23

In my experience (working and living in the Netherlands all my life), most adverts in the Netherlands will not require a HBO study, they usually require "HBO werk- en denkniveau" (HBO-level of working and thinking). You usually must be able to demonstrate that in some way (eg job experience, courses, etc), but for a junior position having actually completed ...


4

My personal preferences aside, most companies that require degrees will also allow you to substitute years of experience for on a 1 to 1 basis. IE, four years of DEMONSTRABLE programming experience is equal to a degree, in many instances. Part of the problem these days is that anyone can hop on Google, and find code snippets, there are tons of answers to ...


9

To put this into perspective place yourself in the recruiter's shoes. How would you like to post a job that has no requirements other than a passion for programming? Imagine that you get hundreds of job applications from around the world from strangers that claim a passion for programming. You have a month to find the best applicant in addition to your ...


7

Question: Why would not having a degree instantly disqualify a programmer? Not having a specific degree is not bad. Even no degree is not bad if you have the experience to make up for it. But having no degree at all for a junior position means I have to educate you. I'm not looking for an apprentice to train, I'm looking for a junior developer that is ...


57

Think it this way: Do you absolutely, really, completely need sports shoes to go for a morning walk? Answer: No, but it helps. Many organizations take this approach, when they prepare the job description / requirement. As suggested by Jay in the other answer: apply anyways, who knows, you may end up getting the interview and bagging the job. To ...


3

As a current junior developer in NL, it is true that most (almost all) job postings I have seen have this requirement. It helps the filtering process, but as someone involved in recruiting from the other side, what matters is the knowledge and not the paper, so do not let it stop you from applying if you think you have the required knowledge. As for the ...


91

There is a lot more to software development than knowing a couple of programming languages and hacking out some code. Universities are how you get trained for that. What does it say about the person hiring? To me it says they care about the product they are developing and want skilled people to do it. If you want to hire an accountant, you look for ...


12

I don't know how it's done in The Netherlands, but here in Bulgaria every job listing requires you to have university degree in some sort of computer related field. In reality I haven't seen seen a case where someone was rejected because they did not meet that criteria. When I ask the people who write the job requirements: "Why are you including this when ...


142

As I understood, a lot of programmers are self-taught and do not have a degree. And likely don't work in jobs that have a hard requirement for a degree in CS. Why would not having a degree instantly disqualify a programmer? Some companies expect their developers to all share a baseline of knowledge before working in their respective teams. Some require ...


-1

You would not have applied unless you were a viable candidate for the position. The employer needs to hire somebody. So they won't mind a followup. Don't worry too much about harassing them with just one followup. Ten followups, no. That's harassing them. Also, you might ask somebody in customer support for the hiring web site about whether you should ...


1

TL;DR - Anything that can potentially save time and resource for both the parties in the hiring process, is usually welcome. To elaborate: If as an applicant, you are not sure of the job role and responsibilities, it's always better to reach out to the recruiter / point of contact for the job / opening and get clarification, before you submit your ...


1

Plenty of things are acceptable in this space I've cold inmailed alumni on LinkedIn, sent out emails, been referred though mutual connections, etc. Cold calls would be less acceptable because a phone call requires an immediate response while a LinkedIn message can be handled at a convenient time, but I also say this as an introvert who hates being disrupted ...


3

Your posture should "mirror" that of the company you are working for. One company I spent several years at had a high turnover problem. They were talking to potential new hires "all the time," and the HR and line departments were happy to get "reasonable" (not perfect) candidates. Another company I worked for wanted to hire "only the best." In that kind of ...


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