New answers tagged

1

When you say Europe, I'm going to assume you mean the Schengen Area. Even without visas being an issue, there are other barriers that need to be taken into account on both sides regarding international workers that wouldn't normally be an issue with local workers. Relocation costs, tax issues and language barriers (as you have noted) immediately come to ...


1

I had a similar situation a couple of years ago. I was hired for a programming job and 2 months later the project was canceled, so we were all laid off. I chose to keep it so that the gap between jobs was not as long and when any potential recruiters have asked about it I'm honest and tell them exactly what happened. I followed that up with a contract ...


3

Your field is also quite in demand, so you would probably not be causing real damage by omitting it. That said, I would lean toward labeling it as a contract position. You can discuss the precise detail of what it was if need be during an interview, but a resume/CV is supposed to paint a picture in few words. Contract--while not precisely true--is the ...


116

Should I email them now saying I accepted another offer? Since they are companies I have interest in, I might want to work with them in the future and want to find the best way to keep doors open. Yes! That is the most professional thing to do. You'll leave a good impression that may help you somewhere down the road. It takes just a few seconds ...


2

I had 2 interviews scheduled with Company B and C for next week, which I both cancelled by informing them I have accepted another offer in the meantime. It was good of you to be courteous by informing in advance. This potentially saved some work/time for the recruiter and interviewer. what do I do with companies D, E and F, which I have applied to, but ...


26

The other answers have it covered pretty well: no need unless you reach the interview stage. I just want to add that if anything goes wrong with your accepted job and you need to get back on the job market quickly then the applications currently in a pre-interview stage could be a lifesaver. It is unlikely that anything will go wrong with your selected job ...


4

No. If they respond to wanting an interview, then let them know you have accepted another offer.


57

No need. In normal business relationships it would be a common courtesy and appreciated as such, but for some reason most recruiters operate quite differently and are lacking even the most basic courtesy around communication. They won't bother with a "no thanks", so you don't need to bother either. If someone actually contacts you, you can simply reply ...


3

Ambition is one thing. Being the right person for the job is another. Whether or not somebody else is better suited for the job is irrelevant. What you need to consider is what kind of message you give to management. Considering that you're the newest, the youngest, and presumably the least experienced, would you come across as someone who is over-ambitious?...


6

If you want to role, and you think you are suitable for the role, you should apply. Don't worry about other candidates, think about how you would fit the role. You need to think about if you have the kind of experience they are after. Do you have the required skill set? If you are going into that interview very under-qualified then, yes, that would be bad ...


1

You put down on your CV things that make you look good. It's a showcase of your skills, abilities and personality. If the jobs that you've been fired from don't showcase any of your relevant skills towards your target part time job. Then don't list the job at all. When they ask for a list of previous jobs, then you would state jobs that you've been fired ...


0

You have two issues to consider. One: The best way to get an interview. Ask the recruiter for advice and help. If you make direct contact with a hiring manager, ask that person for help too. "I really want to work here; please help me make that happen" is a good way to pursue it. Two: Conflicts between recruiter and hiring company This really isn't your ...


5

On a resume and in person, strongly resist temptations or requests to describe your skill "on a scale of 1-10" or "beginner/intermediate/expert". Instead, describe what you can do, and what you do at the moment. So if you set up systems, say so. If you build web sites using this and that framework, say so. If you wrote a few scripts as part of some larger ...


1

Why not pursue both? So long as you're transparent when talking to recruiters about having multiple applications in the system, there's nothing to lose by submitting an online application and one through the recruiter. A duplicate application can easily be removed later in the process. A direct application ensures the company sees your profile and it's not ...


0

The company may well have hired the recruiter because they were getting no response. Does the company web page say how long the role has been online? The opposite might be true. The company may have decided to advertise on its own to either save the recruiter’s finder fee and any ongoing commissions — which are usually quite high — or because they have have ...


7

There are pros and cons to going direct. While you can cut out the middle man and can negotiate for yourself, the company might not know you; you're another random person asking for a job The company might have a professional relationship with the recruiter, who is actively seeking people who are suitable for the role - essentially the company is using the ...


4

I'm by no means an expert as I've never personally used a recruiter, but based on colleagues and friends experiences they've shared with me about recruiters is summarised perfectly in this answer from this question. Recruiters often have a good perspective of the industry so they can help fix up your CV, prioritize skills or otherwise make yourself more ...


0

The amount of time you should wait would depend on what reason you were given for not getting the job. For your case specifically, where you were told it was because of "not enough experience", then I would wait at least a year, probably more. The main question you need to consider is whether the amount of experience you have gained during your time working ...


3

There's no real set "rule" for this - if you've been passed over by a company for a given reason then there's no point in re-applying until the reason no longer applies. If they have passed you over for "not enough experience" then that can be a little nebulous. If it's "not enough general experience" then you are unlikely to be able to significantly change ...


0

Reach out to a recruiter and ask when they suggest you apply. A recruiter for the position you're interested in will be able to best advise you considering your total experience. Companies will frequently relax experience requirements if you demonstrate capabilities another way - a recruiter can help you find ways to do just that. Keeping in touch with ...


0

In general, no one can tell, as this is based on the company recruiting guidelines. And sometimes people change and the guidelines with them. Best is to ask whether it makes sense to reapply and when! Most companies will happily tell you their current guidelines. If you are very lucky they might also give you personal feedback as to how much sense it makes ...


2

One thing you can do is trying to improve your chances to get into an interview where they are more willing to overlook this factor and make them want to choose you over someone else with more experience. Something that I have seen recommended often, and which has also helped in my own experience, is to write fewer applications but make sure you write a ...


2

It depends what stage you were at in the hiring process Application Only: Don't ask, they will most likely not want to give you feedback and the feedback would only be based off your resume/cover letter. Phone Screen: If you had a behavioral phone screen with a Recruiter, don't ask, you just need to practice your interview skills. If it was a technical ...


1

I haven't had any luck getting responses from asking after a rejection, mostly because the majority of jobs either never let me know my status or it's a "no-reply" email address. What I have had success with is at the end of the interview, while you're still in the Q&A phase, ask them something on the order of "Is there anything that makes you hesitate ...


4

how professional it'd to ask for some feedback when you receive a template-based rejection email? Very professional (Also depends on how you ask it) Or it'd be just a waste of time ? It is not waster of time since you may actually get feedback. (Though they are not into any obligation to do so as others have pointed out). One of my interviewer in past ...


3

You might not get it but there is nothing wrong with asking. If I put working into the application, maybe there were code samples for example I would think it only fair that they put in a little work too. Depending on the company or the type of position you may get a no but I do not see a downside. In fact if someone was rejected for a position, willing to ...


10

It's probably not going to do any great harm, but I suspect you'll just get back another essentially template response along the lines of: There were many good candidates for this role and we decided to go with a candidate whose skills and experience more closely matched the requirements at this time. Thank you for your application and we encourage ...


8

I graduated with an Associate's Degree in Computer Programming in 1999. I thought for sure I'd be working the next month as a COBOL programmer. But that didn't happen. I ended up taking a job as a "Network Operations Engineer". That's a fancy name for the individual that sits and watches a bunch of DOS apps on a Novell network. If/when one failed ...


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