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196

Your friend is giving you some shaky advice. It's true that if the company is looking at major layoffs being the only one who can do X is really good for you. However keeping this to yourself means people in the company are less likely to know what this technology is capable of and won't suggest using your skills on interesting projects so it's less likely ...


96

Your friend's advice reveals his underlying assumptions about the workplace in general. He sees the workplace as a hostile environment where the survival strategy is to preserve indispensability. In this bleak view, colleagues are not co-workers - they are rivals for the scarce resource of job security. So you must ask yourself - is your workplace such a ...


53

A country tag may be helpful here. A person could argue he is creating a hostile work environment which could lead to trouble for the company. Typically going to HR is not wise, since they are not your friend and only look out for the company's best interest. This may be a case where HR should be involved to correct a manager that is clearly out of line. If ...


35

Please review the documentation the company gave you regarding the 360 review. Pay attention to anything related to protecting your anonymity. Pulling everybody into his office, either as a group or individually, would seem to be a violation of the process. The company needs to know this happened, because if this behavior is allowed that means nobody will ...


31

When I hire people, I do ask them to set their salary. "What do you want to be paid?" I ask them. Only if they refuse to name a number (having believed those people who claim the first to say a number "loses") do I offer one. [Do I always pay people what they want? Well, I don't always hire them, and wanting far more than what they are worth to me is one ...


23

If you go to HR, remember to present it as a company problem, not yours. What your boss has basically done is to give anyone fired in the future grounds to sue the company for unlawful termination. Anyone in that room has 7 witnesses that he has threatened to fire anyone as repercussion for their bad review - not based on performance of each employee. IMHO,...


22

I think it is reasonable and a good idea to keep your resume up-do-date. I would try and do it outside of work or at lunch time, ideally not on the company equipment if possible. There are pros and cons though: Pros: Keeps your information up-do-date so you don't forget items later Reminds you of all the things you actually have in it Has the latest ...


20

You really are trying to solve the wrong problem. If you have decided turnover is 20k a year value, just set your "midpoint" salary at 85k instead of 70k. Or alternatively, instead of making compensation review a once/year thing, make it part of a regular ongoing feedback cycle. The reason that this: This is followed by a period of watching how much they ...


18

I would not want your friend working on my staff! An open sharing environment will get more done because you are able to build on each other's input and knowledge. Another way to look at this... Do you want to forever be the only one that knows how to do those things? By training others, not only are you seen as a positive influence on the team, you are ...


17

Please don't do this! As JoeStrazzare points out in his comments this system (and pretty much everyone I've ever seen that was similar) can be gamed and that will allow bad workers to get really good appraisals while the geunine "good" employees will suffer, and ultimately they will be forced to pad their estimates as well just to avoid the negatives. So ...


15

Short answer: Don't bother responding. If you are already quitting anyway, then just let it roll off your back and leave. If you are planning to quit, then I would keep my opinion to myself, find the job and be happy in your new role. It never ends well when you spray vitriol in an organisation as you leave. It sullies your reputation far more than it ...


15

The problem with creating any system is that people WILL game it. The best way to motivate people is to praise in public, correct in private, show appreciation for work and give them a clear path to advancement and growth. Point systems can be gamed and what will end up happening is that your employees will work to the system and not the actual betterment ...


14

It is a good idea to always have an updated résumé or CV available, one never knows when one may need to use it (for example if someone's job were made redundant this afternoon, by having their updated CV immediately available they can start job-hunting without delay). By establishing a pattern of regularly updating one's CV over time, regardless of whether ...


12

First of all, are you "sharing" knowledge or lecturing people? Make sure the attention is wanted. If somebody asks you for information, by all means explain a technology or method. Avoid making uninvited lectures, though. Your colleague's idea of refusing to answer questions and hoarding information to get a competitive advantage over your co-workers is ...


12

This strategy is flawed in several ways: If you make yourself indispensable at a task, you will have to keep doing it. Therefore, you can not be promoted. Do you really want to keep doing the very same entry level task until you retire? Your coworkers will probably notice that you are not sharing, and stop sharing with you. This will prevent you from ...


11

An annual 20% pay raise is unsustainable if you work anywhere above minimum wage. Lets say you make 50K a year. With a 20% pay raise each year, you would end up with nearly 300K anually by year 10. And it would put you at 2 Million per year after another ten years. Simply put, if you haven't been on national TV as either a genius, athletic superman or ...


11

If this happened as you describe it, then you need to be prepared that you might get fired after any performance review, independently of your performance, and there will be very little you can do about it (assuming USA, in other countries there would be some laws to protect you). So you can't expect that by working hard and doing a good job you will have ...


10

I believe your last paragraph kind of answers the question. Let me address them one by one, I have a very good relation with my manager .... No, You don't and even if you actually have very friendly relationship with your manager. He doesn't care it and why should he ? This is a professional atmosphere his job is to reduce the project cost as much as he ...


10

If an objective does not need to be tied to a concrete project, objectives could be: Learning new skills Helping team mates Recieving help from team mates Automating processes Improving estimates Dealing with non-programmers


9

An 'Increment' is just a salary increase, usually one that comes to you automatically by virtue of just working for a year, or just as a 'cost of living increase'. Government salaries often come with an increment every year. There may also be a 'merit-based raise', which may be awarded together with or separately from an 'increment'. If they happen together ...


9

This is an unfortunate side-effect of a work culture that doesn't thrive on that constructive-criticism feedback loop. You probably aren't receiving this type of feedback, because the people who are reviewing you are not receiving feedback like this as well, nor are they comfortable with giving it. It sounds as if the company as a whole does reviews to ...


8

I ask people that sort of thing for two reasons: I don't actually know how that job went and whether you did well or not. I want you to tell me the truth I know if the job went well and I've already decided who did well and who did poorly. I want to know if you're capable of evaluating your own performance. It's pretty hard to know which question your boss ...


8

It depends on the site, and you should be subtle. On LinkedIn, if your profile is public, everyone you know will see the changes. Generally someone putting 17 new skills, or rewording all their experience, is signaling that they're on the market. The right way to do it is to set changes to private, and make the switches. Other sites may not have this ...


8

A 500% raise is unlikely to happen in your scenario and could cause an issue if discussed. Firstly companies are very wary (quite rightfully so) of having people who cannot be replaced. Secondly you don't know if they actually have the budget for it. Plenty of other reasons such as morale etc,. If you were one of my guys I'd start looking for your ...


8

Venting is never really a good idea. It doesnt really achieve much, if anything and may come across as you just moaning. With the sheer amount of things you have, thats alot of things to talk at the person with. An appraisal is generally a space for constructive feedback for both parties, constructive feedback generally means raising an issue constructively ...


8

Your boss's reaction is inappropriate and hostile - you should alert a trusted leader in the company or HR if you feel comfortable doing so. Anticipate that your report will not be anonymous. If you're concerned about backlash, make that clear to HR and keep track of any adverse treatment you believe is a result of you raising a concern about your boss. If ...


8

The first thing you need to do is brush up your resume and start looking for a new place to work. This is more of an insurance plan than anything as your boss has already threatened to make you and your colleague's work environment miserable. He has also threatened to fire all of you. Next, you and your other colleagues that were present for this meeting ...


7

Just go ahead and ask for it. Be polite and state the purpose. For an annual review or similar it is totally legitimate to ask for such letters or mails and I wouldn't expect anybody to see this as selfish. Especially if they know the corporate ladder. Superiors should actually be happy about your request, I would think, as it shows you're invested in the ...


7

Think about it this way - your colleague is either giving you good advice or bad advice. If he is giving you bad advice, then you shouldn't take it. If he is giving you good advice, why? He should be advising himself not to share this piece of "valuable" knowledge about the workplace. So if the advice is good, you should ask why he is sharing it! ...


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