Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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I'd suggest, take the safe route, don't bring any gifts now, the intention may be misinterpreted. If you bag the offer, you'll have plenty of opportunity later to share some of your local delicacies with the team. I would like to show some form of gratitude to them for this opportunity Show them gratitude in another way, make sure you are prepared ...


120

This is not about profanity at all. It's about understanding (or accepting) that different people (and groups) have different rules. a new employee keeps saying "no profanity at work place" What is happening here? That person is trying to enforce his personal rules on the group. But he's not in position to make that rules. Simply point that out. You can ...


75

If someone in rural Australia can't handle the occasional F word maybe they're not a good fit or they are trying to change the culture of an entire nation. I'm in Sydney and I've worked in large companies where there is no swearing at all and also worked in smaller companies where the F word is one of the nicer everyday cuss words used. I'm not a huge fan ...


60

after all, they did just spend a few thousand dollars flying me over just for a half day interview They inviting you (and paying for the trip) isn't a gift. It one of the costs of hiring, which are part of the costs they pay so that they make more money from their workforce. This doesn't mean you shouldn't be thankful for the opportunity to interview ...


58

You can quit? The working world doesn't consist of choosing to do and not do things regardless of whatever your boss/business requires. There's... really not much more to it than that. You are paid to do things for your boss. Not paid to do whatever you want. If you find your interests don't match your companies, you can either: Work to get transferred ...


57

The way I'd approach this would be to get positive confirmation from your supervisor that you're doing the right thing - depending slightly on how you're assigned work, perhaps the most obvious way is just to have a "read back" at the end of your meetings with your supervisor and say something like "Just to confirm, today I should be working on features A, B ...


50

Say that to avoid misunderstandings you want to make/take notes of what he says. Have a whiteboard (in his office, which you can both see) on which you write (in note form) what he asks you to do. Agree with him (i.e. confirm), at the end of the meeting, that the notes on the board are correct/accurate. Take a photo (e.g. using your phone) of the finished ...


37

Are Employers Allowed to access/search through one's personal email outside work hours? No Employers are allowed to use their own equipment. Read everything stored on their computers, on their email servers or similar. If you stored private information there, you have no right to privacy. But, they are not allowed to make any use of it. If they find your ...


36

I don't think you can do much more than explain your motivations, as you have done in your question. It might help to try to tune how you deliver your explanation. Some ideas: As mentioned by Blam, do not talk too much about stress - that may look like you easily carve in under stress. Just explain that you prefer to focus on other things. Explain that you ...


35

I would advise you to let them know that it would be one way or the other and not declare you won't use their system. If HR requires 9-5 daily then tell them that would mean you don't do any work outside of those set times as it violates their time and attendance policy. It seems clear the company wants to use the time and attendance system as defined. ...


35

The problem is here that if you can't prove that someone in the company broke your equipment (no one admitted it), then there's not much you can do except claim for the damages on your insurance. This problem is in the past now - all you can do is get it repaired through your insurance and move on. Not letting this happen in future is the question here. ...


34

I'm sorry you had to go through that situation. I'd include the working experience and the name of the company in your CV. Otherwise, it will look either like a 3.5 years gap or that you are trying to hide something. They are going to ask you the name of your previous employer straight away, and why you haven't included it. As suggested by Joe Strazzere, ...


28

How can I make this new employee understand that using the F word is ok (in a non-insulting way) ? If this new worker is uncomfortable with those words you could start by bringing him/her up to date on the work culture of your company. A one-on-one talk should be ideal for this situation, something like: Hey Joe. I have noticed you sometimes get ...


27

What can I do in these situations to politely bring the facts to light (without offending my supervisor) ? At the moment its just me and my supervisor working on a project. Right at the moment he says "I never asked you to do this" I am dumbfounded - what are some of the ways that I could deal with this situation ? At the time you are asked to ...


27

A general rule-of-thumb is to think about the dress-code you would use on a normal work-day if you get the job, then dress slightly higher than that for the interview. So if you would use a pair of jeans and a (t-)shirt to work, maybe go with your finest pair of jeans, a button-up shirt, and a nice sweater for the interview. As far as the Ruby-conference t-...


27

How to deal with team lead who keeps recommending you new jobs? Ignore the recommendations. Focus on getting an excellent referral after your two years. Don't get roped into anyone elses career moves. You owe this company some loyalty, they haven't done anything I can see that warrants you leaving them after the investment and trust they have placed in you. ...


26

.NET is not a language. This is a detail, but it quite strongly suggests that your programming skills are not as high as you may think. I think you have few choices: quit right away, accept the mission but look for a new job aggressively and quit as soon as you find a new job that aligns with your goals better, persuade the manager to give the task to ...


25

You need to see a lawyer. It appears that the company is in breach of contract and also used your equipment without compensation. As you don't have a written agreement on that, a lawyer can advise you about what the usual assumed unwritten agreement is. And you should not have done what you did. Using your own equipment by yourself is discussable, but ...


22

First off I have to say commiserations - I've been through very similar and it wasn't pleasant. A previous employer of mine operated a similar system and any instances of clocking in late or clocking out early were automatically flagged not only to HR but to the directors as well! Working 5+ hours of unpaid overtime (finishing after 1am) on business critical ...


22

It sounds like he needs some grief counseling. Does your work have any kind of Employee Assistance Program? Any kind of help to get him? Can you refer him to a counselor? A pastor/clergy? He's already used the phrase of killing himself. Maybe it was a joke, maybe there is a slight bit of truth. You need to help him. If you don't know what ...


21

I am currently looking for another job and was wondering should I put the actual name of where I worked on my resume or not? Yes. You should include the name of your current company on your resume. You can't leave it off - that would leave a gap in your resume. And you can't just leave a vague reference to an unnamed company - that would just raise ...


21

It sounds to me like many devs who are "Java developers" and do not want to learn python because you can do everything with Java... The way I see it, is that you have a good opportunity here! How many people have a good knowledge of AWS and Azure? Also what I have learn over the years is that knowing several technologies almost always plays to your ...


20

First of all, I'm on your side, but I still disagree with: It is almost impossible for the management to get developers to stop using F for qualifying their emotions. If upper management wills it, it's definitely possible. A swear jar may have to be implemented, one or two employees may have to be let go to be made examples of, and the moral of the ...


20

Update the Handbook If you are going to have a permissive environment (and imho, goodonya for that approach) in this day and age that should probably be documented. Let new hires know that if they hear 'crikey, that task took f*^@ing ages' there's no intent to cause offence by the profanity. Culturally, Australians are traditionally happier in a reduced-...


19

Your friend is clearly living in her bubble. You are going to be the one who has to figure out how to punch a hole in her bubble and burst it because none of us can help you with that - we don't know her and consequently, we have no idea how to reach her. Her delusion is that the world reacts in the way she expects it to react when she acts in the "flirty" ...


19

You live with it, you excel, or you leave. As a minority within a minority, I've had this issue to various degrees in almost every place I've worked, it's not confined to Indians. I've overcome it by proactively training myself to be self-reliant, self-educating and self-confident. These are useful and necessary skills to acquire if you want to get ahead. ...


18

You cannot maintain a healthy mental state when you tolerate abuse, period. What you need to do is update your resume, send it out, and be ready to move on. Then, you need to put a stop to the abuse or move on if you can't. You are, in fact being set up to fail and are being bullied. Understand that confronting the COO may mean that your job there is ...


18

P and only P should do the following: File a formal complaint against G for yelling and threatening him over the documents. File a separate formal complaint against G for not following the company's secure print procedures ( which resulted in multiple copies left at the printer unattended ). Talk to the company's security to determine who picked up the ...


16

The general rule is simply: Ask! Dress code varies a lot between companies, and depends on many aspects, such as company culture, local culture, culture of the business sector (banking vs IT vs manufacturing), job description... So in general it is perfectably acceptable to ask about the dresscode. Typically you'd do it during the phone screen (if there is ...


16

It is not common practice as far as I am aware. If you want to show gratitude for the opportunity make it a point to thank them in person both before and after the interview and let them know how much you appreciate their gesture. The key is doing so in person first and not waiting until you are back home to thank them via email. If you absolutely want to ...


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