New answers tagged

1

As this is sounding very Australian, here's my suggestion: Check the award as to what the On-call allowance is; Decide whether that is worth having an on-call roster; Consider offering some of the casuals full/part-time positions; Set an upper threshold for unpaid sick days (e.g. a maximum of 10 unpaid sick days); Make sure you're keeping records; Contact ...


1

I suggest creating a designated list of spare employees on a rotating basis. Also create it 2 months out into the future at least so people can make plans around it. The people on the list will know they might have to come in to work. Giving them 2 months or more advanced notice allows people to swap days with other people when they need it.


4

How do people in other centers or industries manage this? I know folks with kids and I pass by at least two daycares on a regular basis, so I can tell you some of what folks here have been doing. Unfortunately, the first is the thing you don't want to do: Exceed government requirements for the educator-to-child ratio. Have a few teachers that float between ...


1

How do people in other centers or industries manage this? Rostering a casual worker always before hand and hiring extra staff are very cost prohibitive. The day care center I'm familiar with manages it this way: they have a large pool of casual workers to call on if someone gets sick. If they had only one person to choose from it would be unlikely that they ...


0

I feel there are a few ways to handle this, probably throwing the policy out of the window might be a good start. If there's a policy, some are following it, and if there are no 'punishments' for breaking it is not in-place, then you're punishing the employees who are loyal. "We have about 20 staff working and have at least 4 of them randomly messaging ...


1

One simple adjustment you can make is explaining the issue to your staff and asking them to message you earlier if they suspect they may not be able to make it Monday. Most people will take a "wait and see" approach, even if they were sick Friday night, all the way through Saturday, when it comes to Sunday they will be hoping they will get better, ...


2

First: Reach out to upper management, and see what tools are available Can you you hire an extra person? This would give you margin to work with. Can you preemptively ask on Friday for 2 casual staffers to come on Monday just so the 4 missing ones are already sorted out? Can you offer a bonus to employees who use less sick days or gives good advance before ...


1

There are really 2 cases here: Either you believe there is an abuse of the system or you do not. If you do: Provide a carrot-or-stick system for your employees to have them abuse the system less. The carrot might not actually be achievable; rewarding people for not being sick is more or less a lottery, because you never know when you might e.g. twist an ...


5

As other Answers have stated, you don't want to change your policy to make it more strict, especially during the current pandemic. This will only make things worse, not better. Not only will you effectively be trying to get people to work while sick, causing more workers and kids to get sick, but you'll also add more stress, which is well known to compromise ...


18

I understand the desire of every business to be as efficient as possible with its expenses. But why wouldn't you have an extra person or two scheduled for a few morning hours with option to extend for the rest of the day if needed? This will help with morning rush, and move your potential staffing issues to a day light and not the night when you cant get ...


11

So you have this policy: There already is a policy in place that says staff should inform at least 24 hours in advance - which no one seems to care about and these situations: staff who calls in sick very late in the night the day before. We have about 20 staff working and have at least 4 of them randomly messaging me on a Sunday night (or another weekday ...


-10

Just as a practical tip: I volunteer at a small private school, so the business is similar to yours. There is a list of substitute teachers and every teacher has it. If a teacher is ill (or has a funeral to attend or whatever) and arranges his own substitute, then there's no penalty. If the school admins have to arrange the substitute then there's $100 ...


12

Childcare is usually low-paid, low-status work with poor benefits. You're competing in the labor market for employees, and the bargain being arrived at is one in which your employees get the deal they currently, implicitly have: they can take a day off whenever they have the sniffles (=possible covid symptoms, too), and they can also take a sick day whenever ...


74

People tend to wait until the last minute because they don't want to let everyone down by taking a day off. They feel a bit ill and hope it goes away. You should encourage them to call in early to warn you that there might be a problem, without having to make a definite decision. An analogy is that most people know that a ship in immediate trouble should ...


29

Make your employees feel more comfortable about calling off earlier. You said each employee always has a doctor's note? Well, then they probably aren't calling off of work until they are sure that they are sick enough for a doctor to give them a note. If you want this to change, then step 1 is almost assuredly removing the need for a doctor's note. They are ...


199

There already is a policy in place that says staff should inform at least 24 hours in advance - which no one seems to care about, clearly. Because it is completely out of touch with reality. You require what? People to notify you 24h before they get sick? Who are you hiring, child care or supernatural doctors? Imagine I strain my ankle on the stairs on my ...


65

Given the current circumstances, you probably don't want to. Given the current circumstances with the pandemic, you probably don't want to discourage employees from taking a sick day, even if it is on short notice. If your childcare centre becomes a Covid hot spot because an employee decided to come in while sick, that would be really bad for your business, ...


0

I think you misdiagnosed the core problem. This isn't an issue of 'direct manager backstabbed her'. This is an issue of your mom having a different vision on employee interaction than her supervisor. You're describing the new employee as insubordinate, along with some actions the employee has taken. Now, your mother has an expected series of actions she ...


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