Hot answers tagged

226

No, you should not. A bonus is for past work. You've done that work, and you've earned the bonus. And think of it this way, would you have felt guilty if you left six months after getting a bonus? Three months? A month? Two weeks? A week? Would there ever be a day you felt guilty if you resigned that day, but not if you resigned the day after?


142

My question is, is it my fault that I was overlooked, undervalued and underpaid for so long? There's no way to know without a lot more details, but "fault" isn't something that should worry you anyway. Every company has a unique culture. Some companies value quiet, steady work. Other companies value loud cowboys. In some companies you can grow to more ...


116

Just resign, you're not obligated to explain anything. Set your focus on your own future and don't worry about that company. Once you have seriously decided to leave you have one foot out the door already.


97

This is not a normal practice. Your manager picked the worst way to award a bonus. They had an obligation to do this themselves, and they are avoiding having to make a decision. They are making the awarding of the bonus money 100% transparent. That means that if under your favorite plan you would have received X and somebody else would have received x/2, ...


95

It sounds like you have your PM over a barrel. These are the terms I would demand to guarantee I actually get what was promised: The 2020 bonus gets paid immediately. Or as close to immediately as possible. The salary increase takes effect immediately, backdated to December 1st. The 80% Bonus gets paid In Advance, this month, with the provision that if ...


81

One thing the other posters have not mentioned that is worth trying is to tell your new employer that you are due to receive a bonus of $XXX and can they offer a signing bonus in its place so that you can start the new job on the date they would like you to start. You may or may not get it but it is certainly worth asking about.


74

tl;dr; You can "test" how trustable this 2021 bonus is by requesting the immediate payment (before end of the year) of the 2020 bonus you actually never got. If employer says no => Start looking for a new job, your employer is not trustable and/or not financially stable, there's no good reason to assume it will become better. If your employer ...


69

You're eligible for a bonus, if you and/or the company/department you work for meet some criteria. If that happens, it will be at least xyz. Except depending on the exact wording of the bonus policy it may even come in under that. What's this worth? $0. There's a billion ways for the company to game it, in one company I worked at it was a joke where the ...


62

I once had a boss that I really didn't enjoy working for. I was pretty happy when she left the company. To my surprise, a few months later she called me and invited me to work for her again, at a new place for more money. I accepted. I didn't enjoy working for her the second time, either. For many of the same reasons. I have come to realize that some of ...


54

I had a job once where I was working there for several years and was making less than they were hiring new employees for. I went to HR and complained about X employee, who was making almost twice what I was (salaries weren't that secret in those days in that business) and I wanted to know why. The HR woman told me it was because he had years of experience at ...


53

Should I let my employer know about the offer and a chance to beat the signing bonus? No, according to stats 90% of counter offers leave (or are fired/let go) within 6 to 9 months (see link), it's harder to leave a second time if you accepted a counter offer to stay. You are unlikely to be leaving purely down to money, so making money the reason to stay ...


53

there is too many good people on the team Since you didn't say anything about other employees not deserving a full bonus, I'll assume this statement is true. And if this is true (and you don't have a manager who has trouble giving critical feedback and/or doesn't want to address performance issues), than I'd be miffed by the system, not my manager. ...


52

I think it depends very much on what you mean by "have to decline". To me that suggests your financial situation is more parlous than you've suggested, meaning you actually can't borrow the money to repay the education expenses. If you can borrow that money from someone else I'd definitely prepare to do that. If you can, it means the "I'd like a signing ...


48

You should always manage your own career. Do NOT try to manage the careers of others. Stay long enough to get your bonus(es). You've earned them. You do NOT owe your current employer anything beyond the 3-week notice. It was their job to retain you. They failed. When you put in your notice, if they are intelligent at all, they will reach out to anyone ...


46

I asked this question a little over a year ago, and at the time, overwhelmed by the multitude of responses, I didn't follow up as well as I would have liked to. However everyone's answers and comments gave me the caution to guard myself and my coworkers from an undesirable or awkward parting, but at the same time sufficient courage to take into account my ...


45

is this actually a normal agile practice? Agile or not, it's absolutely not a normal practice. It's rather a clever way to split your team, much like the infamous Apple of discord did. And it will take quite some effort to persuade me that the manager didn't see the quarrel coming. what's the best way to approach this chaotic situation? Toss the ball ...


44

Bonuses are generally a reward for the work you've done in the past. If you've earned it, I think you've earned it.


42

This seems bizarre to me because if I was so important to keep around then why not make those things available to me while I was happy to work there instead of waiting to the very last minute when very little can be done to keep me around. Let's face facts: that companies pay you at all is because if they didn't, you'd work for someone who would (and legal ...


39

Is there any professional way to deal with this situation? You don't have a new job yet - you just hope to get one eventually. You are only scheduled for an interview. It's all fine to be optimistic, but the reality is: You haven't even had the interview yet You don't know if you will actually like this company You don't know if they will actually like ...


38

I think if you observe closely how people think and act, you'll understand your situation better. Many people go crazy for discounts, your boss probably isn't any different. Have you ever told the cashier in the supermarket: "This special offer is too cheap for this great product. I'll pay more for it."? I guess no, so why should your boss? The second ...


33

I'm assuming you are getting a bonus for things that happened in the past (because pretty much all of them are). In which case; you've earned this bonus through your actions in the past month/quarter/year/whatever. Taking the bonus and then leaving isn't unfair or unethical; it's yours. In fact; it would be unethical of your company to deny you the bonus ...


32

Don't explain. Don't justify yourself. Don't even mention that you have a better offer. Just resign. You'll need to keep your new employer secret for a while. It's better if your boss thinks that you resigned without having another job in sight yet. Don't even tell your former coworkers, because if you do tell them, they could be coerced into letting your ...


29

Yes, that would be unprofessional. You agreed to do a job under certain conditions, for certain pay. If you mis-estimated (given that it took longer, I'd say you did), then that's on you. If I were hiring you, my response to a bonus request would be 'No', followed by 'And don't come back here no more'. If the job was harder/longer than you estimated, then ...


29

Should I let my employer know about the offer and a chance to beat the signing bonus? That depends on your goals here. If your current employer matched the offer you got, would you stay despite your "fair degree of frustration"? If so, then go ahead and ask if they will match it. And if they do, find a way to get past your frustration, and stick around ...


28

I go hard line when it comes to money, and I don't tolerate any sort of monkey business, I'm only working for money. It hasn't always worked out straight away, but mostly it has. So there is a definite element of risk. On the whole I think it worked out for me in the long run getting out of environments that weren't getting me ahead, although I might have ...


28

One slight caveat to the answers given so far: Make sure you are aware of any specific terms and conditions that may be attached to the bonus! In some industries, especially banking, bonuses may now be delivered in stages, so you might get 30% now, then 30% in a month and 40% the month after. This is in place to try and persuade employees not to hand in ...


27

Your prospective employer has no business asking, learning, or knowing about your financial situation. I've been on job interviews where not getting the job would mean losing the house, but I kept my desperation to myself. My situation had nothing to do with my ability to do the job, the reason they would be hiring me. Starting off a professional ...


26

What you need to ask for is a 'Retention Bonus' in leu of leaving and taking the new job. As noted, you need to be prepared to be walked out the door, but usually a discussion won't go that far that quickly. A retention bonus is basically a bonus with strings attached that you will stay a period of time. This may be a year or could be as long as 3 ...


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