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0

It's not rude or ungrateful to ask someone to give you what they promised to give you. If after 2 weeks into the internship you haven't received the signing bonus I would bring it up to my immediate manager or supervisor and pursue it from there.


5

TLDR: Either ask your supervisor or just wait until after the expected date to follow up. As someone just joining the work force I apologise if I am mentioning things you already know but I will assume you know as much as I did when I joined as a graduate. Payroll, expenses, salary - all those things that require payment from the company to you will go ...


1

What do managers and companies care about in deciding whether or not to award a raise? That depends a lot on the specific manager and company. In my personal experience, issue number one was "fairness", i.e. I would rate my team and make sure that the compensation differences reflect what I thought is the relative value of each team member. Issue ...


3

I wouldn't do this. You highly underestimate the probability that they will find some cause to fire you for. If they look hard enough, they will find one, or else they will simply make one up that will be hard for you to fight in court. Have you ever delivered something late? Has there ever been a single bug in your code? Have you ever disagreed with ...


6

First, look after yourself. If your colleagues are laid off, and then you give notice, there are two possibilities: Either your employer says "oh ____" and has to scramble to hire your colleagues back; at that point your ex-colleagues will have very strong cards in their hands and if they are clever, they will benefit (guys, feel free to post here :...


1

IMHO, you got to look for the number 1 - you. I would NOT suggest to say anything before all your cards in play. It is not your job to safeguard this employer from bad faith damage he did to you and going to do to other senior engineers As you stated, its been a year and a half since you cared for this employer :)


8

I think your post is quite long, so first I want to summarize it to the essentials. Soon you will leave your current employer for a position elsewhere. You have been told that soon some other employees will be laid off, some of them are friends of yours. By announcing/hinting early that you are leaving you can prevent that (some) of those other employees ...


5

If you tell them that you're planning to leave by a certain date, then that's the equivalent of a voluntary resignation. And if they fire you early, you may still be owed severance (or even owed unemployment benefits), but you may only be owed money for the period of time between the time you got fired and the actual time you said you'd leave, or perhaps, ...


48

You should always manage your own career. Do NOT try to manage the careers of others. Stay long enough to get your bonus(es). You've earned them. You do NOT owe your current employer anything beyond the 3-week notice. It was their job to retain you. They failed. When you put in your notice, if they are intelligent at all, they will reach out to anyone ...


2

The unfortunate reality is that all you really stand to gain by giving advance notice is a good recommendation from your current employer in the future. You have much more to lose. A good manager would appreciate the advance notice and work to secure your final bonus, but this may or may not succeed depending on the overall company financial position, your ...


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