Hot answers tagged

109

If work was supposed to be fun, it wouldn't be called work. I'm sorry to tell you this, but welcome to the rest of your life. You might find a work that you enjoy MOST of the time, but you very likely won't find one that you enjoy ALL the time. What I suggest you do is think about the outcome of misbehaving during work (and in front of clients). You might ...


90

I keep asking my boss for new work but he is constantly in and out of meetings and near always on the phone, meaning I get a small piece of work to tide me over but not much else. This is a common mistake people make when asking their boss for work. Don't expect your boss to give you explicit tasks. Coming up with work for knowledge workers can be really, ...


59

I think this is a pretty clear situation. You have been hired as a C# backend developer who could use some knowledge in frontend technologies, and you ended up doing mostly frontend, so you're not working on what you've been promised. This is a problem, and you are right to bring this up to your management. People tend to forget a very important thing: you ...


51

There is the (in)famous motivational "fish video" (youtube and other sources) that shows fish market employees enjoying themselves on the job. The point being, if people can enjoy that physically demanding, bad smelling, and at times, disgusting job, so can you. The way to succeed is to make the job enjoyable and have a game with the work. You need to ...


37

Chartered accountancy has a well-deserved reputation as a dull profession. Accountancy is vital and valuable work, which must be performed by qualified and dedicated professionals, but it has none of the features that our ancestral environment shaped to provide an adrenaline rush. Your accounting firm may be attached to exciting projects or exciting ...


37

Maybe not what you want to read, but being able to read and understand code is a VERY important skill for a developer and fixing (and searching for) bugs is an excellent opportunity to improve this ability. Moreover, coding is not about writing code, but about thinking how to write good, maintainable and efficient code. I suppose this is a pretty complex (...


30

At the risk of sounding like your parents, you may need to step back from your (likely temporary) discomfort and consider the big picture: As you stated, you've only been there two weeks. Careers are a lifelong pursuit. Two weeks into your first job, you may not be in a position to legitimately make a choice about what you like or don't like. I apologize if ...


25

Is it normal? Yes, this is normal for a junior dev. Is it a bad job ... No, a job that gives you time to learn on the job (or in your case be on stackexchange) is a good job. They're paying you to learn and not have responsibility. But why? Speaking as a senior dev it's usually faster for me to do it than to tell a junior what I want. And if I have to ...


25

TBH, you come off as a little bit entitled in your question. "I can't listen to spotify." "I can't download software from the internet." "I'm bored with my tasks. They don't give me anything exciting to work on." "They get upset if I arrive late." Well... the company doesn't exist to make you happy. They don't exist to fulfill your ...


19

Short answer: You should mind your own business. By talking to your boss you could severely affect Alice (and even John possibly) in a negative way, as the situation may come down to her as you mentioned. It would be even worse if you talked to your boss's boss, as going over your boss's head is something you should seldom (if not never) do, and even less ...


18

You get through boring work at a job the same way I got through my fifth year (tenth grade?) English Literature set text. If you've ever had the misfortune of reading Thomas Hardy, I share your misery. We had a dense, 50 chapter tome to read. I powered through and got it done in a couple of weeks - so, I was allowed to read any other books I wanted while the ...


16

A few thoughts based on the effects: The neutral case to state the positive things in the new job and let your management try to intuit the reason, assuming they care. "I'm leaving for a better opportunity and a greater challenge" Because it's nice and vague, they won't take it as a criticism, but you risk the problem that they won't get a subtle hint ...


16

I think the situation is familiar to everyone. This happens due to ill-management or bad estimates, and this is often a problem. The company I work in has a certain policy about this. If someone has no work, this is the problem of the whole company, and they should inform the manager, the team leader and our boss about this beforehand (at least 1-2 days). ...


15

This is normal, even for senior developers new on a job. You start with bug fixes to learn about the technical ecosystem. No one's doubting your technical ability (but if you're lousy, that will show itself eventually! SMILE). It's easier to give new development to people who already know how things work in that particular company and its line of ...


15

She should talk to her real boss at the contracting company and ask to be reassigned due to no work. She should show documentation of the times she has asked John for work to prove that she is not just lazing around. That person should discuss with their contacts at the company what to do. Many people hate to delegate and whine they are overbooked, but won't ...


13

You cannot assume he knows you have no work to do. You cannot assume that there isn't work he could assign you if he knew. I have rarely worked anywhere where there wasn't some work that we could never get to due to time pressures. Now before you go tell him, think for a few minutes about what are some projects that could help the office out (and perhaps ...


11

It is not uncommon. When a new person starts there is a breaking in period. First that person needs to learn systems and the network. So any task you are given you are unlikely to be able to complete with out some amount of help. This limits your productivity to tightly scoped and documented tasks. These take time to create, often more time than it ...


11

When I state it is not enough he says he doesn't want to give me something bigger until I have more knowledge of the business. He is right in a way. Doing work quickly is not enough. Doing it well, and perfectly is. I hope he is intentionally keeping the bigger tasks away from you, so that you learn how to accomplish your tasks with better quality and ...


11

I am looking for new challenges and areas to grow my skills It's the stock answer for "I'm bored". This question is usually just to see if you fly off the handle at your previous employer. Avoid all negativity in your answer. Sound as positive as you can, and never ever bad mouth your previous employer. Your interviewer will be able to read between ...


10

Things will pick up Sometimes you join a company and they're so snowed under with work that you get thrown in at the deep end. Sometimes they've got plans for you but the project wasn't running before you joining so they aren't ready to put them into place the instant you join. And usually it's somewhere in between. In your case it sounds like you joining, ...


10

I appreciate this doesn't cover your specific example - but I think that's as much down to being watched whilst you do the work, rather than to allow you to work in your own way. But more generally for dealing with "boring" jobs my general trick is: Automate it Most jobs that are boring are jobs that don't require much mental processing. Therefore they'...


9

It may be a bad job but it could be also you - check your attitude and be proactive Let me elaborate a bit more: I'm sorry to disagree with the people here and I find myself astonished that people find this normal. How is a junior programmer supposed to learn and improve if he is given no work? My personal experience out of the university, when changing ...


9

Focus on getting a good result for yourself. In the exit interview, or generally upon leaving, most people want to leave with a good relationship with the other people who are likely at some stage to re-appear in your career in future. When they ask why you're leaving, you can say something like: "I received an offer which I found interesting." If they ask ...


8

Go to your boss. Make sure it is a private meeting (closed door). Maybe use "I'm kinda embarrassed to even come to you about this, but I actually don't have much work to do right now, what should I do? Can I do some education and the like?" I think that suggestions like doing SO, personal training, skills improvement, etc. are all good things but make ...


7

You need to step up to the plate and talk in person to your boss and ask for an assignment. Sending an email and sitting around waiting for someone to respond shows a lack of intiative and passivity that is not a good characteristic in an employee. If the boss hasn't reponded in a day or so, then talk to him. Make a suggestion for something you would ...


7

Bring it up as something that's impacting your performance (which is bad for the company), and offer changes that can be mutually beneficial. Telling managers you are bored usually doesn't go over well (there are some exceptions), but telling them that you are unable to be as productive as you can be due to not enjoying the work as much and not having the ...


7

ADHD software dev here. I read both the other replies, and they are good, I +1 all of their advice, but I'd like to throw in my two cents. This is the internet so I'm sure I'll get a lot of replies telling me how wrong I am, but these are all things that have helped me be successful in my personal life. I am not a doctor (obviously) and ultimately you ...


6

The good news: With one exception, management thinks highly of you. It sounds like you're smart and you get things done. Competent management appreciates that, even if they don't communicate it well. The bad news: In a small company, sometimes even the CEO can't make a new management position at the drop of a hat. Management might need to do a major re-...


6

You should absolutely discuss this with your boss. In most cases, it's the job of a team/group/department leader to make sure all of their employees have enough work to do (and, conversely, that nobody has an absurdly large amount of work to do). If you don't have enough work, you boss most likely has not noticed yet. Assuming they are any good at what they ...


6

Should I talk to John's boss (who's also my boss) or mind my own business? Unless this impacts you directly or your performance, you should most definitely mind your own business. This can have a very adverse affect on your working relationship with your co-worker, and make you seem as though your just a self serving nark. If however it does impact your ...


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