Hot answers tagged

14

More senior positions that come with significantly increased pay require more work. In other news: snow is cold, and the Pope is Catholic. That said I think right now you've got a skewed level of study - there's a certain amount that is going to be due to you having to catch up to the other seniors on the learning curve. I'd expect over time this will ease ...


12

I say listen to your body. I have been burned out twice. Don't let it happen to you. Did you know that burning out can have lasting damaging effects on the brain? When work affects your sleep you need to take a step back and address the things thst makes you stressed out. There are many causes of stress. The two main ones that I have experienced are being ...


11

It sounds like you are losing your mind trying to keep a sinking ship afloat. Your company is terribly understaffed and/or horribly mismanaged if you are working 24-hour shifts, skipping lunch, and having 7-day work weeks. How the owner handles the separate issues with your friend's productivity and his kids' salary are not issues you can control or change, ...


8

The most reliable way to address a problem with overwork due to management issues is to find a new job. I.e. effectively fire the management. Understand that other options also may result in you needing a new job, as you may be laid off or fired. So the first thing you should do is polish your CV. Assuming you want to keep this job, when they tell you ...


8

I don't know why someone downvoted you. This isn't that uncommon a problem. Could it be burnout? Yes. But it could also be that your work behaviors are maturing in different ways. As those new skills develop, you find you want to pursue them. There's no problem there. In a sense... Welcome to middle age... You get to make a choice. For me, it was (...


6

The one-to-one meetings you have with your manager should be a time in which you're able to raise any issues affecting you / your work. It appears that while you may feel you're working out of your comfort zone and not doing the work you want to be doing, no one is telling you you're doing a bad job. I know the feeling only too well but sometimes an ...


6

We've all been there - I've had projects that I'd gladly have dropped for a bit. Unfortunately that's not really how it works. Presumably this project is being prompted by a business requirement - you mention it being for the field and support engineers and there being a deadline. The scope is not fixed - and changes as per my progress and the whims of ...


6

There's multiple factors here that are working against you in this situation, some are things you can control (if you choose) and others aren't: You're having an effect on people's finances that the perceive negatively: I noticed that previously before I joined, the claims for mileage, annual leave etc, has been processed daily.. but when I came in, I ...


6

I had a five hour interview on day and the next day it was a seven hour interview. The interview consisted of one hour per team member or manager asking me questions at both interviews. I know what you mean by feeling burnt out. A lot of them asked me the same questions and I felt like a broken record. I would keep a mentality of you wanting a job and would ...


6

I made a career change about 8 years ago from IT to a much different field. I did include my IT career on my resume simply because it is a work history -- it showed I could keep a job, etc. Just recently (6 months) I lost my job and have had to fall back on my IT career until I find a new job in my new field. I was completely open and honest in the ...


6

Your brother is most likely having a hard time adjusting to the demands of being employed again after months out of work - that's not to say there aren't genuine issues for him though. Doing "unrelated works" is a common feature of many jobs - and this is especially true at small firms where they don't have the headcount to have a person dedicated to each ...


6

Question: How many hour a week do you work (either paid or unpaid)? 40 hours a week should be maintainable. Anything above that you need to cut it down. Since you are thinking about changing jobs or just having a break, which means your boss loses you 100%, you can go to your boss and say "the working hours that I do are too much. I'll cut it down to 40 ...


5

Just talk to your boss, ask if you can work fewer hours. You clearly need more time for your education and your homework. From your question I get the impression that you're afraid your boss is going to get upset because he "expects" you to work 20 hours a week. I think you should look at it from a different angle. He will just be grateful for mentioning ...


5

Several things I think of this: Regarding the Boss's son and daughter I would suggest you let it be. If they are unprofessional and irresponsible it's their problem. You should focus on doing your job the best you can (which is what you are doing). Besides, trying to argue or point fingers to the boss's son/daughter is hardly recommended, as you have the ...


4

Don't just sit there, watching the wall coming closer, take control and steer away before you smash into it. Was I stupid to take such a job in the first place? Ill advised, to put it very politely. You need to know your abilities and shortcomings very well! Only take on assignments that you're confident to finish, even if you need to acquire ...


4

Direct answer to your question first: How can I ask my boss to relax this requirement? Option A: You can mention to your boss casually that it's giving you some hard time doing so since English is not your first language, but the excuse only work for a period. If you want to keep the position (and it's pay-level), you got to prove yourself fit it. ...


4

What are some strategies for keeping energy, enthusiasm and the quality of my interview performance high while in this situation? Interviewing is hard work. There is no shame giving yourself a week off to recharge. Remember to eat good foods, exercise, and all that good stuff for your own mental and physical health. But I think there might be a deeper ...


4

I 90% agree with motosubatsu's answer, so I'll just say my piece on the 10%. it sounds like he is in need of an outlet to vent a bit. Listen to him, and re-assure him that you and your family want him to succeed. OP and his family can't be the brother's emotional punching bag whenever he wants to. Yes, they need to be compassionate and understanding, but ...


4

Ask him. Why not? You are a student above everything else. If internship is part of your curriculum, it should be treated as part of your study not as employment. I am doing graduation project at the moment in a company, full time. However, I do have to finish other subjects, and I made this clear to the manager. It is an internship, and the company should ...


3

What your brother is doing is 'unloading' his stress on you. He isn't looking for you to fix his problems, he's looking for your support and sympathy. It's very difficult, when someone starts telling you about their problems and how upsetting they are, not to try to help them fix the situation. That is not what this is about. What is happening is that ...


3

This isn't "mobbing" in my opinion - it actually sounds a lot like the fairly common practice where a more senior staff member is given more responsibility. That said it doesn't sound like it's in the career direction you would like. What I would suggest is that in your upcoming one-to-one that you discuss this with your manager in a positive way. I've ...


3

The first thing is that regardless of the root cause -- underlying health issue, or stress-induced health problem -- something has to give. I'm going to ignore root causes and focus solely on how to regain control over your work load and associated stress. One of the first things you need to learn about "work" is that if you don't tell your boss you're ...


2

One step that hasn't been touched on much: update your resume. You have, from a very unpromising start, created an application that should be beyond your abilities. Emphasize that. You are almost certainly not going to be paid what you're worth where you are, and you definitely can't keep that pace up. If you fall back to an effort level you can ...


2

To quote from one of your comments: The funding isn't really there to hire an additional resource and, to be honest, I don't even get paid that much. They definitely are not paying me as a full stack developer, which I believe is essentially the role I am playing. An important thing to realize is, that if a company cannot afford to pay (adequately) for ...


2

Software projects are always overpromised and underdelivered, that's more or less a fact of life. Step 1: Mention to your manager you are understaffed relative to the workload. Estimate (realistically) how long it will take for various milestones in the project to be ready, even if it was just you working on them, assuming 8-hour work days, and report that ...


2

I think there's two questions you should be asking in this situation, that would give you the best solution to your issue. Should I ask for a break from this project? Since you said 'but my manager wants me to stick to this' I get the idea that you already discussed this or that your manager has already made it clear you're not switching. I assume the ...


2

Your last line is the actual question: How to tell management they are bad at managing things? Are you paid for the overtime and weekends? If yes then the company have resources for new hires If not then isn't you who are financing the company? Doing overtime for months mean you are basically doing someone else job just sliced into smaller parts. It's ...


1

Conservatively, what is the maximum number of hours you can devote to work? It is ok if the answer to this is zero. In addition, what is the minimum number of hours you can afford to work? Hopefully zero but it is important to consider this. Once you have figured out the maximum/minimum number of hours you should speak to your boss. You could open the ...


1

In my current position as a Senior Civil Engineer, I've a target goal of 35 billable hours per work week. This is necessary because like you, I have similar intense education requirements and other non-billable work. I'm expected to pursue a new certification, gain proficiency in an advanced CAD program, assist with proposal development, etc. Some weeks I'm ...


1

Would it be a negative sign that I can't continue a project till the end? Yes, it would be a very negative sign that just because you "are a little turned off" you can't finish the project. Particularly when you already know what your manager expects from you. You don't want to come across as someone who cannot meet their commitments - particularly for ...


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