Hot answers tagged

84

Go talk to a doctor or psychologist. Apart form this advice, do not listen to people on the internet saying things you should do Burnout is a serious affliction, not to be taken lightly.Your brain is overworked and things have broken down. This does not need to be permanent but it could be if you do not take care. That is not to say you have the full ...


77

Two issues. Your taxes and quitting. ...it's been more than 5 months of overtime money that has not been paid and there are no benefits whatsoever, sometimes the salary can be late. [...] And I did not sign any contract when I was told that I was a permanent employee, only verbal statements and congratulations. If you are in the United ...


49

In this case, feel absolutely free Loyalty demands a certain amount of reciprocity, i.e. the employer must treat you reasonably. Being overworked, having lousy project management (getting that far behind is the evidence of that), not getting paid for overtime, sometimes not getting paid until late, and being unable to sleep all each individually qualify as ...


38

may I resign in the middle of this project? The answer to this question is always "Yes" There is never a good time to resign, it will always be an inconvenience of one kind or another. However, that inconvenience is not your problem; your problem is that your employment arrangement is no longer convenient for you. The project status is your employer's ...


12

And are there strategies I can use to recover from what I described above without having to take extended time off or call in 'sick' ? If you are indeed burnt out, then you absolutely need to take time off. Whether you take it as vacation or sick time is irrelevant, if you do not rest then things will spiral downward. If I were you I would, seek the help ...


11

It sounds like you are losing your mind trying to keep a sinking ship afloat. Your company is terribly understaffed and/or horribly mismanaged if you are working 24-hour shifts, skipping lunch, and having 7-day work weeks. How the owner handles the separate issues with your friend's productivity and his kids' salary are not issues you can control or change, ...


8

The most reliable way to address a problem with overwork due to management issues is to find a new job. I.e. effectively fire the management. Understand that other options also may result in you needing a new job, as you may be laid off or fired. So the first thing you should do is polish your CV. Assuming you want to keep this job, when they tell you ...


8

This is a typical occurrence in software development: it's impossible to anticipate every use case, or guard against every possible way your client may break the application you've worked on. Even if you think you've done so, it's a certainty that some client, at some point, will break your app in a way that you can't possibly have imagined. As to how to ...


7

Speaking as someone who also works from home as a software engineer, and who also loves his hobby projects, I can suggest some low impact things that might help provided you have not got yourself in too deep. Take a short break soon Whatever you can afford, perhaps a long weekend. Do something you would not usually do, for a change. If you are low on money,...


7

While you might actually suffer from a burn-out, you might have been wrong with your self-diagnosis. Ideally, you go away from programming, in a relaxing environment, for a minimum of two weeks. You define relaxing: walking in nature, seaside, doing some sports - hiking, cycling... But you state you do not want to take time off. In this case, we need to ...


6

Question: How many hour a week do you work (either paid or unpaid)? 40 hours a week should be maintainable. Anything above that you need to cut it down. Since you are thinking about changing jobs or just having a break, which means your boss loses you 100%, you can go to your boss and say "the working hours that I do are too much. I'll cut it down to 40 ...


6

I had a five hour interview on day and the next day it was a seven hour interview. The interview consisted of one hour per team member or manager asking me questions at both interviews. I know what you mean by feeling burnt out. A lot of them asked me the same questions and I felt like a broken record. I would keep a mentality of you wanting a job and would ...


6

There's multiple factors here that are working against you in this situation, some are things you can control (if you choose) and others aren't: You're having an effect on people's finances that the perceive negatively: I noticed that previously before I joined, the claims for mileage, annual leave etc, has been processed daily.. but when I came in, I ...


6

I made a career change about 8 years ago from IT to a much different field. I did include my IT career on my resume simply because it is a work history -- it showed I could keep a job, etc. Just recently (6 months) I lost my job and have had to fall back on my IT career until I find a new job in my new field. I was completely open and honest in the ...


6

Your brother is most likely having a hard time adjusting to the demands of being employed again after months out of work - that's not to say there aren't genuine issues for him though. Doing "unrelated works" is a common feature of many jobs - and this is especially true at small firms where they don't have the headcount to have a person dedicated to each ...


6

If you're experiencing burnout (i.e. this is affecting your health, your general mental state, your social life or other parts of your life), go see a doctor. Burnout is serious and can result in long-term damage unless treated appropriately. The below should not be considered alternatives to getting professional medical treatment. Many of the points below ...


6

And what is stopping you from applying for jobs in companies where you think you can make a impact? If you can't leave your job because of money (or any other reason) maybe you can start working as a volunteer on something that might have a more immediate effect, like helping feed the poor in your city, or maybe teaching people in the poor part of town how ...


5

Just talk to your boss, ask if you can work fewer hours. You clearly need more time for your education and your homework. From your question I get the impression that you're afraid your boss is going to get upset because he "expects" you to work 20 hours a week. I think you should look at it from a different angle. He will just be grateful for mentioning ...


5

Several things I think of this: Regarding the Boss's son and daughter I would suggest you let it be. If they are unprofessional and irresponsible it's their problem. You should focus on doing your job the best you can (which is what you are doing). Besides, trying to argue or point fingers to the boss's son/daughter is hardly recommended, as you have the ...


5

You're going to be asked about the gap in your resume. If and when an employer says "What have you been doing for the past six months?" You should have a satisfactory answer prepared. They aren't trying to make you feel bad, but if you say "I got burnt out and quit," they will most likely want some valid reason to believe that you will not burn out on them ...


5

Understanding what excites you at work is a universal challenge - we've all felt like you're feeling now at many points in our careers. You might consider different "sources of meaning" as your reflect on your current role or potential future roles: Self - "What's in it for me?" Do you enjoy improving your own skills, learning about new topics, or ...


4

I 90% agree with motosubatsu's answer, so I'll just say my piece on the 10%. it sounds like he is in need of an outlet to vent a bit. Listen to him, and re-assure him that you and your family want him to succeed. OP and his family can't be the brother's emotional punching bag whenever he wants to. Yes, they need to be compassionate and understanding, but ...


4

What are some strategies for keeping energy, enthusiasm and the quality of my interview performance high while in this situation? Interviewing is hard work. There is no shame giving yourself a week off to recharge. Remember to eat good foods, exercise, and all that good stuff for your own mental and physical health. But I think there might be a deeper ...


4

Ask him. Why not? You are a student above everything else. If internship is part of your curriculum, it should be treated as part of your study not as employment. I am doing graduation project at the moment in a company, full time. However, I do have to finish other subjects, and I made this clear to the manager. It is an internship, and the company should ...


4

I've been where you are. Five years or so into my first job out of university, I found myself the sole developer on several simultaneous projects. I was working insane hours far beyond my (out of date) contract in order to try and keep on top of everything, I was stressed and suffering from anxiety in a big way, I wasn't getting overtime pay or even any ...


4

I would leave as soon as you have secured a new job. It is a really bad sign that they pay you late and haven't given you a written contract. And if you were promised paid overtime and they haven't paid that either, that too is really bad. Things are likely to get worse, so leave as soon as you can. Your employer needs to do more to retain you than rely ...


4

You are not the only in these case of having a delayed response to being long-time overloaded. I'd say that after long time of bending, you allow yourself from breaking, now you are in an environment that makes it possible. This doesn't make the need for a rest less necessary. If you are financially comfortable, have earned vacation days (I hope you have, ...


4

If you are truly willing to leave anyway, then there's actually fairly little to be lost by having a frank, closed door discussion in which you say that you need some personal time, first as a general request and if necessary with increasing insistence and detail until you are understood. While this would be on on the border of ordinary norms of continued ...


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