Hot answers tagged

732

he's made a point of cutting OT to nothing, focusing on his personal blog/LinkedIn to show off his knowledge, focusing on generic skills/abilities (at the expense of company-specific skills/technologies) and encouraging other engineers to do the same. So let me sum this up: you told your employee that the time he invests and the skills he brings do not ...


262

That question is a hard read - I've been through similar experiences to you, although in different circumstances. The answer to your question; How can I keep going? DON'T Or at least - not in the current circumstances. It's clear you've pushed yourself as far as you can go. It sounds like there's nothing else that you specifically can give that may ...


257

You should just ask your manager what you should do, as how to specifically bill your time will depend on your company policy. Of course, you should get paid for this time. You're at work, updating a system that is required for your work. There were probably security updates, for example, that would likely be required by your IT security policies. You weren'...


237

Let me preface this by saying that I am in several "protected groups" and have dealt with workplace discrimination based on that. Including having been told that "They shouldn't be allowed to hire people like you" So, understand that I am not unsympathetic. I then mentioned "wow, can't be that hard being a privileged white male, ...


229

I have been through this and at the time I still thought I was 12 feet tall and bullet-proof. I didn't listen to the signs and ended up destroying my health, my career, and my family. I hope I have your attention at this point because your situation is almost EXACTLY the same as mine was, right down to the miscarriage. Here's what you need to do: Take a ...


225

I really want to come forward and say something among the lines of "I'm really sorry, I meant no ill intention, it was all a mistake and I can even offer to pay back the caterer's fee if you want.", since I'm a very honest person. That is exactly what you should do. You are an honest person and honest people admit their mistakes. And everyone makes ...


219

What your manager says is nonsense. What he apparently wants is "bums on seats". A nice quote from some top manager at Microsoft: "You can make people stay in the office 80 hours a week. You can't make them work more than 40 hours a week". Working more than 40 hours a week decreases productivity, and not productivity per hour, but productivity per week. ...


218

Do not discipline him. He'll walk, and the company will have lost a very valuable asset. It seems to me the right answer here is for you to sit down with whoever you need to sit down with to get the rules bent in this case and to make it happen. You've got what sounds like a brilliant engineer, and you're trying to force them out of the company. The real ...


182

While I won't answer the original problem directly I wish to tackle something tangent to this. And I feel it is important enough to warrant an answer and not a comment. From a comment (and the post) it is established that GPL'ed code is modified and distributed, without distributing also the modifications: We are selling a product with a "custom linux ...


166

Referencing an answer I put in another question: Does having two jobs simultaneously count for twice the experience? Your company assumes that you count each day as fully worked. You state that your employee put 15 hours a week of overtime. In four years, that's around 18 months of extra time. That could be counted toward his experience if your company ...


166

This situation is spiraling out of control out of anger and frustration. I can't speak to the legal aspect, but it should not have gotten to this stage. You basically gave him nothing in negotiation and then now that he wants to leave, you are acting to trap him in his current position. He is a wounded animal fighting back. The promotion (we'd consider ...


156

The first rule of selling yourself in these cases is Tell A Compelling Story. You cannot change the negative information that the potential employer will receive. They will search you out, and they will find it. They will then form that information together in their minds into a narrative of who you are as a potential employee, and it is that narrative ...


141

As someone who has first hand experience working with her, I'd think your input would both be desired and, as an employee of the company with first-hand knowledge, I do think you have an obligation to share what you know. (emphasis there for a reason) With caveats - Your professional assessment of her technical capabilities is relevant and fair. Your ...


133

Clearly, you are not managing these interns the way they need to be managed. It may well be unfair that they need to be managed so differently from typical employees, who want to accomplish, but this is the hand you were dealt. Here is what I would do. First, I would gather them all together for an intern meeting. I would give them the following information,...


131

While I also think your mails are reasonable, I'd like to provide a different perspective: You are telling them that they failed to reply. While true that might be considered rude, no one likes accusations. Instead of emphasizing that they didn't complete their task, I'd simply ask for an update on the issue. This is less accusatory. Something along the ...


124

everything I have read online says not to take minutes/notes at the daily stand up because that is not the purpose of the stand up meeting This advice is usually about an official and formal text summary of the meeting, which is then published or sent to all participants. This is discouraged because: Stand-up meetings are supposed to be informal. Having ...


124

I don't see an overeager engineer, I see a disgruntled one. In this answer, I addressed a similar problem, but one that had gotten worse How can I deal with troublesome Professional Engineer? You have taught your formerly eager engineer that effort doesn't matter. He's put in 700K worth of overtime which he has not taken, and you think the problem lies ...


124

What is the normal rate of turnover among developers You turnover rate looks insane to me. It's more what I´d expect with callcenter-agents. If you really mean you need to source 35 employees to keep your steady 25 active developers level you'd have a fluctuation rate of 140%. Should be somewhere between 10 and 20%. (In 2017 in the IT sector I found an ...


121

I'm kinda surprised that you're surprised by this. Gust has personal working relationships with people that maintain that open-source software. You don't think Gust has vented about your company's handling of his job and duties? You don't think each of those contributors has heard Gust's complaints about how you admittedly underpaid and unleveled him? ...


117

Should I tell him I'll quit or just do it without giving an explanation? Don't bother. Threatening to quit is extremely unlikely to cause the company to abandon the fingerprint scanner. And you were thinking of quitting anyway. Finally, you indicated that you don't want to get into a discussion about the issue anyway. Just find a new job, give your notice, ...


116

I think you need to readjust your view point on the matter. These employees aren't leaving because they were trained, they're leaving because they aren't being targeted for retention. To solve this, you're going to cut the training program, possibly fire or reprimand their mentor, and are willing to rebuild an entire branch office. I'm impressed, that's a ...


111

We can't tell you whether it's legal or not. But to answer your other question... Yes. Go to HR. Don't delay, do it tomorrow. Say you're just checking on if this is normal, standard policy and is it company policy. I would also check with some Canadian privacy groups and I'm sure there's a provincial or federal labor department as well. Yes! It defeats ...


103

For your case, don't bother. Better to leave on good terms and get a reference. It sounds like it's not a good place to work, and you're better off finding a better job. As an aside: Nighfillers at a retail store I worked took exception to a finger print scanner. They tried all sorts of ways to get it removed, including complaining that it was sticky and ...


101

I'm with you, Matthew - this would be a red flag for me as well. As long as you handle the situation tactfully and respectfully, it's always OK to end an interview quickly. In this case, it's best not to mention the alcohol. You could say, for example, "Thanks for your consideration, but I don't think this is going to be a good fit for me. I don't want ...


101

Go see a lawyer. My employer has informed me that this was a mistake (they won't communicate it in writing) As a general rule, when companies have the force of law on their side (and even when they don't) they send demands in writing. When they don't, it is usually because they are doing something they don't want someone to see. Who that someone maybe ...


99

they will only provide the papers in-person, and not via e-mail, for some odd/nefarious reason). It doesn't matter. When they give it to you, just say that you need your lawyer to review it. And of course, do not sign it. Do not sign anything. Also, refuse any extension and refuse any exit interview. so my new job (was able to line one up with a cloud ...


98

I know you did not ask anything on behalf of yourself but humanitarian considerations compel me to strongly advise you to avoid hanging around anywhere near the ass end of your company because that is where it is about to be badly bitten. Your company has made some serious blunders. Not only have they irreparably mangled their relations with their ...


93

It's a part time casual job. People quit them all the time without repercussions. In theory all sorts of things can happen, but in practice no one cares. I've left a couple of jobs with no notice waving a finger at all and sundry. One I just stopped showing up. These sorts of jobs don't have the same sort of connotations as leaving full time professional ...


85

Are they allowed to force me to do overtime at no extra pay? This really depends on your local laws, your employment contract, and your status as an employee, none of which can really be determined here. Your best bet, should you really want an answer for this, is to consult a lawyer. What is more concerning is that your employer appears to have no concern ...


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