Hot answers tagged

259

You should just ask your manager what you should do, as how to specifically bill your time will depend on your company policy. Of course, you should get paid for this time. You're at work, updating a system that is required for your work. There were probably security updates, for example, that would likely be required by your IT security policies. You weren'...


258

That question is a hard read - I've been through similar experiences to you, although in different circumstances. The answer to your question; How can I keep going? DON'T Or at least - not in the current circumstances. It's clear you've pushed yourself as far as you can go. It sounds like there's nothing else that you specifically can give that may ...


224

I have been through this and at the time I still thought I was 12 feet tall and bullet-proof. I didn't listen to the signs and ended up destroying my health, my career, and my family. I hope I have your attention at this point because your situation is almost EXACTLY the same as mine was, right down to the miscarriage. Here's what you need to do: Take a ...


224

I really want to come forward and say something among the lines of "I'm really sorry, I meant no ill intention, it was all a mistake and I can even offer to pay back the caterer's fee if you want.", since I'm a very honest person. That is exactly what you should do. You are an honest person and honest people admit their mistakes. And everyone makes ...


218

What your manager says is nonsense. What he apparently wants is "bums on seats". A nice quote from some top manager at Microsoft: "You can make people stay in the office 80 hours a week. You can't make them work more than 40 hours a week". Working more than 40 hours a week decreases productivity, and not productivity per hour, but productivity per week. ...


146

The first rule of selling yourself in these cases is Tell A Compelling Story. You cannot change the negative information that the potential employer will receive. They will search you out, and they will find it. They will then form that information together in their minds into a narrative of who you are as a potential employee, and it is that narrative ...


141

As someone who has first hand experience working with her, I'd think your input would both be desired and, as an employee of the company with first-hand knowledge, I do think you have an obligation to share what you know. (emphasis there for a reason) With caveats - Your professional assessment of her technical capabilities is relevant and fair. Your ...


133

Clearly, you are not managing these interns the way they need to be managed. It may well be unfair that they need to be managed so differently from typical employees, who want to accomplish, but this is the hand you were dealt. Here is what I would do. First, I would gather them all together for an intern meeting. I would give them the following information,...


126

everything I have read online says not to take minutes/notes at the daily stand up because that is not the purpose of the stand up meeting This advice is usually about an official and formal text summary of the meeting, which is then published or sent to all participants. This is discouraged because: Stand-up meetings are supposed to be informal. Having ...


112

We can't tell you whether it's legal or not. But to answer your other question... Yes. Go to HR. Don't delay, do it tomorrow. Say you're just checking on if this is normal, standard policy and is it company policy. I would also check with some Canadian privacy groups and I'm sure there's a provincial or federal labor department as well. Yes! It defeats ...


101

I'm with you, Matthew - this would be a red flag for me as well. As long as you handle the situation tactfully and respectfully, it's always OK to end an interview quickly. In this case, it's best not to mention the alcohol. You could say, for example, "Thanks for your consideration, but I don't think this is going to be a good fit for me. I don't want ...


93

It's a part time casual job. People quit them all the time without repercussions. In theory all sorts of things can happen, but in practice no one cares. I've left a couple of jobs with no notice waving a finger at all and sundry. One I just stopped showing up. These sorts of jobs don't have the same sort of connotations as leaving full time professional ...


85

Are they allowed to force me to do overtime at no extra pay? This really depends on your local laws, your employment contract, and your status as an employee, none of which can really be determined here. Your best bet, should you really want an answer for this, is to consult a lawyer. What is more concerning is that your employer appears to have no concern ...


81

Note: this answer is based on the original version of the question and assumes that the paperwork refers to NDAs or similar paperwork that someone might reasonably object to signing. If it's simple administrative paperwork then that's part of the leaving process and the below doesn't apply. Talk to your manager. You should say a variation of the following: ...


78

To be honest I'd suggest going with the name change to something fairly common (eg "Joseph Smith") and informing your references that you have changed your name to that. It may be worthwhile asking former employers about their employment verification processes. If those processes are to provide limited information that is specifically requested then it ...


74

Am I required to do so? Maybe not by law, but definitely by company culture, since the boss asked you to. How can I approach my boss with this issue? No need to make this complicated. Go to your boss, tell him that have been thinking about his request to "participate more" and wanted to clarify something. The thing you wanted to clarify is what you ...


72

I'm going to take the alternative approach to the problem and solve it at the source instead of letting it become your problem. Pay your interns at a competitive rate. If you don't like that, skip to the end of my answer for additional methods. I have friends who work unpaid internships; I work a paid internship. Their motivation is almost 0 because they ...


66

Check your contract. As a fellow Canadian, usually when I've seen probation contracts, the probation period is set by a specified number of days, not by an evaluation procedure. If that's what your contract looks like, then congratulations, you passed! I have never had a formal meeting in any job to discuss passing probation; I have only had such a ...


65

they don't know the basic tools we use like Git, agile development, etc. I think this is an unrealistic expectation for unpaid interns half way through college. Git and agile may be popular in the tech industry, but they are not academic topics, the purpose of their time with you is to get a basic introduction to these concepts, so of course they will start ...


63

TLDR: Adjust your attitude, use the meetings to your benefit. The meeting basically sounds similar to a daily standup. Those are commonly done in Agile development processes in addition to Jira boards, as personal information can be far more detailed, filtered and allow for better feedback/questions than a board could. So such a meeting can well make sense. ...


61

This is awful. Not just for you, but also for the company. Legally, it is not a valid signature. It's only a valid signature if you sign a filled out form. Changing the form after you signed, in order to make someone believe you signed the contents of the form as it is, will most likely result in fraud. The problem may be proving it. So if this signature ...


59

Some things are reasonable to expect you to sign. Some are not. For example, they might ask you to sign to declare that you have not left any personal belongings behind, or that you have seen and read (as opposed to having agreed to) some notice that they want a paper trail proving that they have provided to you. So telling you that there is "additional ...


59

Your computer is a tool like any other tool. When a tool fails and you await a replacement, if you're still on the clock it's the same for your computer. Additionally imagine the case where your computer required a reboot (crash/power going out...) - to start an update, would you need to clock out, wait for the reboot to end and clock in? If you're still ...


59

Update your resume and start putting it out as a defensive move. Then ask your manager for specific areas to improve, and get cracking. Germans have a saying: Early is on time, on time is late, and late is unforgivable. Make that your motto and you won't have any problems with future tardiness. What concerns me is the gap in how you did and how you ...


55

How should I politely decline request to travel and explain that I am not going to travel in the future and that it is not the job I signed up for. You should approach your manager and talk about the importance of "no travel" to you and your family. Explain how you were happy to help in the past, but your home situation has changed such that travel is ...


54

Yes gender bias can be a problem. But if you hide your gender until they meet you for an interview, the bias will still happen. Further, working for someone who doesn't want a woman working for him can be a truly miserable experience (Yes I know this from personal experience.) So it filters out the jerks you don't want to work for. However if you are not ...


53

If something like this happens again in the future (and I hope it doesn't). How can I best handle this, and how can I just get out of the interview quicker? Assuming you are truly that offended... You stand up. You say something like "Sorry. I can see this isn't the place for me. Thank you for your time." Then you walk out and don't return. In the ...


52

In addition to the answers about people usually not wanting a lot of small notes (let alone coins) to carry around, there is also another issue here: You're going to run out of change pretty quickly. If you return someone's 5$ change as 5x1$, then an hour later you'll not have any more $1-bills to give out to people who really need one. That's also one of ...


49

You left a comment saying: I don't know... he can see all my progress on our Kanban board. I have never been told why we're having these meetings. So instead of jumping to conclusions about being targeted, ask. This is a chance for you to show your competence and initiative by getting a better understanding of what your managers are trying to accomplish....


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible