23

This might depend somewhat on the size of the company, industry, and location, but generally if you are a valued member of your team your managers aren't going to want to lose you. In the workplace, honesty is always the best policy, there is no benefit to trying to stall or mislead here, it will only serve to stress you out. Remember the HR person is not ...


18

Do I come clean and tell them I'm still working on getting my degree, but that I don't have to go to any more classes or anything? Yes, of course. Explain that everything except your thesis is complete. And, assuming you are actually planning to complete your thesis and get your degree (as you had implied to them), tell them when you now expect to ...


10

[Bob] told me that my manager doesn't like me very much, but he beat around the bush when I asked why and said I shouldn't be knowing that. I know he's your friend, but Bob (that's what I'll call this "other higher up") is being a bit of an arse. In all seriousness, this is a really crappy situation to put you in. If he wasn't comfortable telling you ...


8

It can be hard to not be envious of people who seem to have a more successful career than you, but you have to remember: you are not those people. You don't know what they've been through, or if their life would even make you happy. You may be motivated by different things than they are, and you can't really ever be certain about any of that. No matter how "...


7

Broader expertise is usually viewed as better unless they're looking for a specialist. In which case 6 years is plenty of expertise already. That is just generally though, companies and individuals may differ.


6

However, I want to get to the level where I get to put people on the firing line and replace them with more competent ones. That requires that I at least have the veneer of getting along with incompetents. Getting underperformers fired is part of a managers job, if you want to do that you should become one. If you don't want to do that you should rely ...


6

I was hired with no college, and no certifications that would qualify me for this position. With that being said, does it make sense to expect it? Or could this question potentially ruin my chances to further my career within the company? If I understand correctly, you already have the job and are liked by leadership. And they are paying you to obtain ...


6

How I can properly suggest this to my team leader ? "Hey, boss, team X is using tool Y and it saves them Z hours every week". It's as simple as that. Do it in a chat, wait for a team meeting, send an email - only you know your boss & company culture, so only you can decide how to say it - but that's what to say. If you present a clear benefit (minus ...


6

I have been in corporate office for nearly two years but did not work a single day. This is false, as demonstrated by your comment: I did the internal work like creating the checklist on the basis of which the websites were analyzed, did the presales work which meant making pitch decks for getting businesses, did the reporting work, currently i maintain ...


5

They might just not like you personally, but be perfectly capable - aside from appearing cold - to not let that influence their professional evaluation. I don't particularly like a few colleagues personally either, but absolutely respect their professional competency and work well with them together. I'd just not invite them to a tea party. And that's ...


5

You described your concerns as, But this exactly my concern is, if I have negative perceptions about them, they might be thinking the same way about me. Would this affect my reputation in organisation? Would my manager be affected by this? with whom I have an excellent professional relationship. Any time you have concerns based on assumptions or indirect ...


5

You don't mention your age, but 4 - 5 years in one field suggests you haven't been doing this professionally for all that long? That said, there's no rule that you can't be disinterested in a career path at any point. I'm a developer myself and in a similar mindset to you, but in my case, I've been working in the industry for 16 years since I graduated. ...


5

This one is easy to answer: With a permanent job, you will of course not be leaving. Without a permanent job, you will feel free to look around. (Having a permanent job will of course not stop you from doing what’s best for you, but you don’t have to tell them that).


5

My concern is that managers won’t want to hire me because I’ve never been a team player, which is fair because I don’t really know how to be a team player. Why is this a concern? Do you think your current management will tell any recruiters that you are not a team player? You have over 20 years of experience and this alone will go a long way to getting a ...


4

Engineering and management do not have much in common. Although you can learn about management as an engineer, by interacting with the managers, it will not be enough, usually. You can try my approach: move from pure engineer / developer to team lead / (software) project manager. Once you have good experience with that (it can be as little as one year, ...


4

If I apply there, they definitely would consult their incubated company which I know they do and would have to face this company. That would require a higher level of HR organizational skill than most places have, so unless the company is small enough for them to go ask the relevant people personally, don't worry about it. My friend worked at a major ...


3

A couple of observations about your situation. "Infrastructure coordinator" can also mean Dev Ops. That field has plenty of software engineering involved with it. And, it's a fabulous opportunity to learn about how things really work, both in software and in your company. With respect, your dislike of it may be unjustified. Dev Ops people are in strong ...


3

Generally, the exact same way you'd respond if you weren't an intern and were just a regular employee seeking a job elsewhere. In other words, diplomatically and as far away from 'Here are all the reasons I'm not happy here' as possible. You're not leaving because of reasons X, Y, and/or Z. You're leaving because you got a great opportunity with ...


3

Looking at the objective facts in your post, I am not sure you have reason to be concerned. You are about to get a degree in software engineering (+) You have work experience (+) Some interns were faster than you (-) You were unable to fix bugs in complex legacy code on your own (very slight -) You were congratulated on your progress (+) Somebody was ...


3

If you can write good code in any language, you can write good code in any language. It is true that your experience with certain technologies will help you get on board with companies who are still using those technologies. Be advised that old technologies are still more common than you may at first have thought; my company's flagship product is coded in ...


3

Should you expect it? No. You shouldn't expect anything to happen... either way. That being said, they've made a commitment to and an investment in your professional and career growth with them, so maybe wait until you've completed your studies and see where that takes you at this company. If after what you think is a sufficient amount of time you're not ...


2

It's OK But going to HR for a promotion is probably about as useful as going to Facilities and Maintenance for a promotion. HR should only get involved if the company is illegally discriminating against your promotion because you are in a protected class. Otherwise, HR has pretty much zero business telling business units whether to promote a particular ...


2

I'm going to tell you something you might not want to hear: you might not currently deserve the promotion. Here's why I say that: applying elsewhere. I had a few tries, but other companies will take me at my current level and not at the next one. I would have to "work all over again". I could apply more, too. ... you're a senior dev. Your company ...


2

There is no harm in shopping around I do not see why you would not be diligently applying. Job applications have very little risk, especially if done reasonably. I had a few tries, but other companies will take me at my current level and not at the next one. I would have to "work all over again". I could apply more, too. This may indicate that you are ...


2

Talk to your manager, privately. Ask his advice about this situation. "Boss, I don't have a strong relationship with my peers; I don't interact with them very much for work. Do you think that's a problem? Do you think I should find ways to develop stronger bonds with that team? If so, can you suggest some ways to do that." This does a few things for you ...


2

Whether any work assignment is normal or not, heavily depends on the sector / domain, the industry and finally, the organization policies. While a practice may be common in some cases, it might not be the norm in some organization, and vice-versa. The real question is: are you willing to put your efforts into the work you don't really want to do or enjoy ...


2

Start by presenting your profile to someone outside the company. You probably have no idea whether you are employable as an entry level developer or not. Your skillset could be anywhere from that of a solid junior developer to a high school kid who knows just for loops and it is difficult to tell the difference without some form of outside feedback. This ...


2

I can seem like a team player without inviting the massive disadvantages No, this can't be faked long term. I want to get to the level where I get to put people on the firing line This isn't a dev level that you reach, it's a management role. To get people hired and fired you would need a personal contact at that level or higher that will do it for you.


2

The way to be perceived as a team player is to do the things that make you visible as being a good team player, rather than being a good IC which is what you are now. Team players do things that elevate the whole team instead of letting others fail and saying that their stuff worked so it's not their problem. Being a solid IC can get you to the senior ...


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