59

Manager asked me to reconsider my resignation and he sounded quite convincing, should I listen to him? Unless he presented a written offer, that included the increased salary you should not be convinced of anything other than "business as usual". Any manager that has the desire and means to give you what he has "promised" would have already done so. ...


50

Most of the time, the nicest way is to be straightforward. If this happens in middle of a running conversation, just say: Excuse me if you got confused by the tone of the voice, but I'm Mr. X here, not miss X. Another way, lead the conversation by saying: "Hello, Mr.X here / speaking" include the salutation on purpose so as to leave no room for ...


28

I'm trans so I have special experience here, I guess... Whenever I get misgendered I have three options: 1) Say nothing. 2) Immediately correct them. 3) Correct them if they continue to do it. You have to figure out how much it bothers you. Usually if I'm say... talking to a vendor that I'll never speak with again, I just ignore it. It's not worth the ...


21

Other answers are generally correct in the advice of getting any promises in writing, but are glossing over a really important fact for your situation: You resigned without having another job lined up. That really puts you in a tough situation that is going to be difficult to remedy. While you can't trust any promise of a raise or more responsibility by ...


20

That’s not what you want to say. You want to tell them that you would be happy to accept their offer but can’t at the moment because of the bond. The new company may decide to do something to get you released earlier if they want to, so your problem goes away. Or they may hold on that information and contact you in a year. If you say you’re comfortable ...


15

Diplomacy frequently consists in soothingly saying, “Nice doggie,” until you have a chance to pick up a rock. —Walter Trumball. Right now, they're saying "nice doggy". As soon as you agree, they'll look for that rock. Every last career adviser, myself included, will warn you about accepting a counter offer. The simple reason is that you have proven that ...


11

Take the opportunities you have in front of you when they are there to be taken. You never know when another will come along. As for the decision between small and interesting, and big and pedestrian, I would choose the interesting. While there is some currency in saying "I interned for big multi-national", you're almost certainly going to be asked "and ...


8

As a software engineer, is a feasible plan to alternate two years of working with one year of sabbatical? I imagine it's possible to find a company that wouldn't need you around for a year at a time every third year. I personally don't know of any, though. In your comment you seem to now indicate that you would work for a company for two years, then quit ...


7

Getting to the gist of the question: What is the better career strategy? Stay at one company long term or switch often to get higher pay. There is no one strategy to rule them all. It really depends on your end goal. If you want a higher salary, generally switching jobs laterally is your best bet. Companies tend to offer new hires higher salaries to ...


7

Problem solving skills have always been valued, but here is a reason they are growing in significance: Turnover and lack of training People used to join one company and remain for life. They would learn from the other lifers who were just a bit older. Companies had formal training programs which helped people understand how things were set up. Now, ...


7

You asked, Can you help me interpret this situation better? Should I take any actions? It's hard for us to direct your actions, since they will depend on your personal goals and motivations. However, we can provide advice on a framework to help you proceed. It sounds like the crux of the matter is that you expected to work on a specific project, and ...


6

I'm assuming here that these are one-time failures by people you don't know to correctly identify you, and not coworkers calling you incorrectly on a repeated basis or with intentional rudeness. For one-off mistakes, an immediate, quick, but casual correction is usually effective. Try not to dwell on it, and if the caller apologizes, make your response ...


6

I’m adding a separate answer because most of the answers are speaking to normal negotiation situations and not yours. From your posts, you’re willing and able to be jobless vs. do a job you don’t want to do. So it seems this isn’t about this company paying you more now or possessing leverage over them. Similarly, the usual points about them wanting to ...


6

There are few ways of adding "a set of skills that are rare to find in programmers". The easy way is to identify technologies that are well established, rare but pay well and try to get into that area (for example COBOL). The down sides of this approach in my opinion are huge. Majority of the software like that was already written so your primary goal ...


5

My experience both personally and watching what happens with others is that the best thing is not to make a full change at all. You have 2 years backend, rather than jump to something else, expand on that, either into infrastructure for backend or other directions, perhaps even hosting, but don't waste the experience, build on it. The more wholistic a ...


5

I've been a part of several large-scope, big-budget projects over the past few years, and although I've always referenced my contributions, successes, challenges faced, etc. I've never provided screenshots, code, or anything else to prospective employers. And I do not think I will ever start doing so: First of all, my former employers, most of whom I'm ...


5

First of all, make sure your are approaching them in a official capacity, not just as a college-met-next-to-watercooler person. Couple of steps, when you are working as an adviser for a team which is not directly being managed by your superior: Ensue your manager and the manager of other team is aware of your involvement. Document everything, all ...


4

That offer is worth the paper he printed it on... If he was serious then it would have been on paper. He is already delaying a raise until May.. And when you get to May the next excuse will be “the current economic situation” or “a customer downturn”. Look for the next post and good luck.


4

I am reading your other question and I believe you currently do not have a job lined up. So your hypothetical pay bump is only that, an assumption that may not materialize anytime soon. I think you should not have quit and instead stayed on board without having said anything at all. During this time you look for a job that lines up with what you expect. ...


4

Employers are going to worry about someone who tells them that they plan to leave after 2 years, but 2 years in your first job followed by a year off isn't a huge red flag, if it was a one-time-thing. Doing it repeatedly would be, unless you're only apply for short contracts. If you're not fixed to a 2 year schedule, there are times when you'll get a ...


4

The nature of middle class work is changing. Millions of jobs used to involve repetitive, "by the rules", processing of papers or operation of equipment. Much of that work has been, or is in the process, of being be automated by computer systems or robots. Such jobs still exist but will tend to pay very poorly. If you want to make more than minimum wage you ...


4

Have a talk with your own manager. Explain what you've learned about their technical problem. Explain what solution they're currently pursuing. Explain what solution you have in mind. Tell him that the impression you get is that they're not open to different solutions than they're currently pursuing. Now ask your manager how to proceed. His job as a ...


3

We can´t tell you what to do. First make up your mind where you ultimately want to be. Startup can be quite exciting, but can also be a hell to work in an with no experience... you will probably be expected to do get things done with little supervision. If you want to stay at A, tell B you have singed a contract elsewhere. Tell them you are sorry but the ...


3

The question to ask yourself is what do you want to get hired for? There will be company's that will be, for want of a better word, starstruck seeing an impressive name on the CV and will let that unduly influence the hiring process. Even without that there is some kudos to having an impressive name on the resume. However a more savvy hiring manager will ...


3

Why do you need to correct them? I have the same problem--my phone voice sounds female enough that I will generally be assumed to be female even when they don't know my name (I have the male spelling, the female Lauren is far more common.) Unless there's some reason they need to know my gender I just let it be. It's not worth trying to correct people.


3

You need to earn their trust and respect as individuals (or at least the trust of one or two of the more senior members of the team). You say that you're confident that their approach to the project is flawed. That doesn't matter as far as your short term goal is concerned. Instead, try to offer your help to deal with immediate problems they're facing. ...


2

According to him I could get a 40-50% hike in my next job, but he asked me to an analysis and see if that is what I want. According to me the current organization cannot give me that hike, the next appraisal cycle is in May. He says that I am sincere and it should pay off in the current organization. If it were a 10% hike, I could see the ...


2

"Better"? What do you mean by "Better?" From your question, I'm going to assume you just mean "Higher Salary". I mean, that's literally the only thing you mention about your job - nothing about benefits, corporate culture, personal happiness, technologies that you use, etc. Right off the bat, this makes you look incredibly myopic - especially for someone ...


2

It seems that your company had big plans for the future, but then immediate concerns came and stole the show. This isn't all that unusual in corporate reality. You mention that the e-commerce project has moved forward a bit, but not nearly as much as you'd expected. What's the holdup? Is it money - are the company's financial reserves tied up in something ...


1

Far from a complete answer, but generally speaking if your goal is to work at a large multinational company in R&D, then the hardest part(s) will be: Getting a work visa for the country you want to move to. Getting a job in that country. Getting a job in your field/discipline. Once you have those 3, getting a job at a different employer is not so ...


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