92

Don't talk about leaving until you are actually handing in your notice. It doesn't help anyone. Employers know that people will leave if they're unhappy and no one reacts well to a threat. However you definitely should talk about your worries. Your team lead (and the managers) should know that without the seniors the department can't continue at its old rate ...


59

I would absolutely tell my boss about anything that was affecting my continued relationship with a company I was working for. This doesn't work for everyone, mind you. It takes either a certain level of trust and/or a certain level of temerity to do it. The key to doing it is understanding what you want to get out of it. Do you just want them to be aware ...


32

Time to get your resume/CV out and polish it up. You've shown lots of good stuff here, you've stepped up, started making decisions, managed people (maybe don't refer to it as 'bossing them about' as that comes across a bit juvenile!) and done lots of professional development. Get your CV back out there, and jump off what sounds like a sinking ship! I imagine ...


25

You're fighting a lost battle Your manager messed up dramatically: he lost all experienced developers he is not able to hire the necessary people he is overloading his team with projects he is delegating project management to juniors he is busy without helping anyone all his projects are failing The best strategy now is "cover your ass". Your ...


22

This is an opportunity! Have a think about what you would need in terms of training / support in order to become the new Senior, and then ask your boss whether they are replacing the one they fired. If that feels like a bit of a stretch, aim for a promotion to Lead Dev instead, and think about what training and support you'd need to be able to do that role ...


19

You should definitely tell your manager that you're not happy with the current situation - it is their job to make sure you're motivated to continue working at the company, remove any blockers and support your career development. If they don't know you're unhappy they can't help you. I would suggest not mentioning that you're considering looking elsewhere ...


15

Good on you for already making the decision to move. The main thing to decide is which of the following options to go with: Telling HR. Yeah, HR isn't your friend. But... they might be an ally. They don't want some manager killing morale and torpedo'ing intracompany transfers. I mean, companies would much rather employees transfer internally than go and ...


12

Don't you just love the smell of bureaucracy in the morning? Ultimately, that is all the "tracks" and "levels" actually are - a company-specific bureaucratic abstraction created around the mundane organisational hierarchy. I'm not generally a fan of these things - they have their uses certainly, but I think they do more harm than good ...


12

You are being told no. You would know if they were saying yes, because you would have the promotion. Everything else is an exercise in wishful thinking. They are not even meaningfully engaging with you on a path to get there. You are never getting that promotion without something drastically changing - and apparently saving them millions does not meet that ...


12

The best thing to do in a go-nowhere job that you've decided not to leave is ... a good job. Not a great job. Not a hundred-hour-a-week, eat-breathe-bleed the company job, but a good job. To be specific: take advantage of every scrap of training you can get. If they have a subscription to something online, take all the relevant courses you can find. If ...


11

Searching a job is getting difficult for me as I do not know where I fit. Create different resumes for each type of role A resume is a marketing document. It does not need to be comprehensive, balanced to how you spent your time, or really anything beyond factual in some way. So if you apply for a Devops job, use Devops bullet points. If you apply for a ...


9

I'm not in software development, but I've encountered similar challenges in my field. It's one thing to supervise somebody in an area which you know well - "if Bob was sick tomorrow, I could take over his job, and do it better than him". It's quite another when you move far enough up that you can't be across all the technical minutiae, for the ...


8

I'll approach this question from my own viewpoint and experience, so some of my comments may be considered aggressive. Keep in mind, these are thoughts and suggestions that I level at myself. The first thing that caught my eye was near the top: In our one on one meetings she was encouraging the idea but I noticed that no real progress in any meaningful way ...


8

First off- stop worrying about titles so much. You're being given more money and responsibility, and gaining direct reports. It's a promotion. Titles means nothing. What you've done means everything. Secondly- you aren't being promoted to an M4 (or whatever the level needed for your pay level) because you don't have that level of management experience ...


8

Tell your new senior managers this and ask them for advice. Odds are that your old senior manager has done this before, so your new team is not likely to take anything they say that seriously even if they are "friends". Which they probably aren't. "Work Friends" at best if anything.


8

The best response to impotent threats like this is just ignore them and retain the character insight for potential future usefulness. If she could do anything she would.


7

Share the issue, but not the "I'm thinking of leaving". Managers exist to help solve problems for their teams. "I am having trouble learning and progressing the way I'd like now that there aren't any programmers senior to me except my lead, who's busy with nontechnical work" is a good discussion starter. It doesn't necessarily lead to ...


6

More money is always a promotion in my book.


6

Why would you want to slack off? In current situation, as you describe it, you are going to look for a new job anyway I would suggest, do your job as required and start circulating your resume stating your current position as a term project ;) P.S. Slacking off is adictive, if you start it will be hard to stop at a new position. Also, time drags so slowly ...


6

This sort of boils down to two separate issues. Issue 1: what is the minimum length of time you can stay at a job, without looking like a job-hopper on your resume. For software developers in the current market, I think many would say 1 year is the minimum. Note also that job-hopping is a pattern of short stays, so if you have only a single less-than-1-year ...


6

You took initiative, asked for more responsibility and convinced your manager to give you that opportunity. It sounds like you deserve this. I think my co-workers' careers are on them and they should be creating their own opportunities instead of complaining about mine 100% correct. You are responsible for your own career not your colleagues. If they are ...


5

They are not worth it See this post. Most certificates are offered by companies who's main source of revenue is learning products such as Coursera. These companies have a vested interest in making the test not too long, and pretty easy to proctor online. They also are incentivized not to make them too difficult. The longer you study the fewer certificates ...


4

Some certs do matter and can be very beneficial, but when I say that I'm talking about the professional qualifications and they tend to be technology/platform specific ones that you'll look at once your career takes shape. Taking some basic intro courses/certs such as you describe can be slightly helpful in lieu of other formal education that would supersede ...


4

What makes you think slacking off is going to help you out? Also what makes you think that you still won't be fired for slacking off regardless of how much you slack off? Do you plan on listing your time at this company on your resume? Because if so then you best start doing your job if you want a favorable reference from anyone there. People always remember ...


4

Speak to your boss. It is possible that they have been told not to hire anyone due to any number of reasons. Or, they may be trying to hire but no decent resumes are coming through. Or, they may even not be aware that a lack of seniority in the team is a problem, in which case you have brought it to their attention. The point is, you don't know until you ...


4

Preface: I've been on software development for 23 years and have taken on lead/management roles and are currently employed as an IC Principal Developer. Letting go is exactly what you need to do as your description would indicate that you're moving into a completely different job family. Although the title may say lead, what you will in fact be doing is ...


3

I realize that this site can’t help me make a decision as that is against the rules. I just want to better understand my options. Your options are: Stay, in the hope that you and the management can turn it around and deliver a working product. Should it work out, make sure people recognize your contribution so you can get a fair share of the praise and use ...


3

You've already received your answer indirectly, at least SEVEN times according to your post. You probably should have left after no movement on the title change concern. But your manager figured that if you stuck around THE FIRST TIME after receiving no feedback, the company would continue to benefit and he could continue to receive the benefit of your ...


3

Some points, "Team is struggling, hiring is struggling, and the division is snarled in bureaucracy from above." This is as exciting as saying "the sun rose today." All jobs have suck elements. If you are "young and innocent" enough that you think you can resolve this by changing jobs ... I'm very jealous of how young you are :)...


2

I don't see a downside to asking. It makes sense to have experts involved although not all companies work like that. There are valid business reasons for keeping suppliers and employees at arms length. It's less efficient in some ways but a good idea in others. So don't be overly disappointed if it doesn't eventuate. I'm not sure how to rate your chances. ...


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