395

I was hired for a 2.5 month contract. I was warned by friends and family not to throw myself into the work and not finish too quickly. I ignored them, and did the job in 3 weeks. My employer had me budgeted for the full 2.5 months (I did not know this when I did the job). When I finished early, I was asked to assist with a process that was taking 10 ...


300

If I can write awesome code, why should I care about having visibility? The work I am doing rocks, then why should I think about standing on the roof top and telling about it. The Lie The important thing to realize is - no one cares about what you do at work. No one cares how great your code is. How awesome your widgets are. Reality What matters is how ...


297

I just went through this myself. Not everyone really wants advancement and the more responsibility and pressure that goes with it. It is great for such things to be available, but as long as they are still useful to the organization, and retained, some people are happy without it. In my case, when the new growth path was added, the first thing many team ...


218

Ignoring the fancy language, the company is essentially asking you to take a cut in pay. This is not uncommon, especially when companies are not doing well. From your description, it sounds like you are worried that if you don't agree to the pay cut, you'll be let go. If you want to keep your job, or you think you'll have difficulty finding another job ...


216

Unless you are willing to make a political blog your fulltime job, take it down or publish under a pseudonym. At this point in history, we are seeing entire careers ended for things as tame as an intemperate or ironic joke, or an insult. Case in point An intemperate joke Just type in "lost job after post" in your favorite search engine and find plenty of ...


214

Why do you think it's a red mark? It shows that you quit the first time without burning bridges and that your previous employer thinks highly of you, otherwise they wouldn't want you back. I did pretty much the same thing: tried a startup that tanked after a year and went back to my previous gig. No problem at all.


205

Please note that this answer is based on the original post and comments, which described a completely different context than after the edits. The original question was mainly based on a misunderstanding by the OP. Someone has to say it.. Do not join the new company! You didn't even start and they are already blackmailing you! It's completely unreasonable ...


204

Is this normal? In my experience, this is not normal. What typically happens is your employer would work with you in the transition by supporting you with training. Or alternatively, you employer could allow you a bit more time to do tasks in this new technology to account for the learning curve. I will say however, as a developer myself, it is on me ...


202

Some people work to live. Others live to work. If she is happy and doing a good job why worry. She has different priorities in life.


196

What strikes me is your note that it's a government agency. I've had some experience with this, so I can tell you what to expect. You're going to be dealing with something that has been neglected for years, snarled in red tape, outdated, messy, and you will not be provided with all the tools needed, not allowed to bring in your own, and will be stymied by ...


173

As an introvert SE, I have my style of doing things and getting things done. Same here. But an introvert isn't a protected class, nor is it a disability, so anywhere you work isn't going to start running to make special considerations for you based on the fact you "just prefer to work in the zone". There's two angles I'd take here. Firstly, if any kind of ...


156

Don't think about them. That company is living rent free in your head right now. Just throw them out and move on. I too have given free rent to a former company, and it was hard to forget them. But I mostly have now, and I am better for it. That company will likely go belly up soon anyways if they can't keep any talent at all. And the problem with ...


145

From your comments: Actually management has make promotion exam in english to enhance Englsh understanding better which helps to understand technical orders mainly in English This sounds to me as if there is a valid business reason why the role requires a decent understanding of English. Rather than arguing for an exception why not approach the worker ...


144

You will probably get answers telling you there is no need to catch up, which may be a valid point. However you are specifically asking to catch up so I will try to help. I took awhile to graduate from university, and in fact I did not start until I was out of high school for two years. I believe I am in a similar situation as you are. I graduated in ...


135

Like it or not, social or "soft" skills are more critical than you think. While I absolutely do not subscribe to the idea that a person's thought and behavior can be boiled down to a few letters, being an INTJ or an introvert does not preclude you from being a good workmate. Promotions always come with an increase in responsibility and almost universally ...


131

What you are basically saying is "I want to continue to get more and more money without continuing to produce more value". I'm not saying you're not providing value as an individual contributor, but in order to continue to increase the value you produce, you have to provide some sort of leadership. Think of it this way, did you spring forth from your ...


129

As a 17 year old you'll probably find two sorts of clients to start with. Those who already know you or are referred to you and online ones wanting cheap work done. With the online ones it's not actually necessary to meet them physically. I've done a lot of work for people I have never met. I've done the work cheap, and I'm not keen on taking time off from ...


126

Always use your vacation. Your boss not using his is idiotic. Most people who don't take vacation are actually scared that things might run more smoothly with them out. Take yours. Definitely don't set a precedent on not taking even some. It is your benefit and no one other than your boss will even notice that you worked through your vacation times. To ...


126

Here's an alternative to Philip Kendall's excellent suggestion: Do nothing. Don't tell anyone (at work or at home). Wait and see if you are in fact promoted. Normally notifying the sender about an accidental CC is a good idea, but what (other than possibly embarrassing your great-grand-boss) will you accomplish?


125

Your friend is just wrong. Obviously companies hire from other parts of the country, otherwise everyone would be stuck in one city for the rest of their lives. Is it helpful to live in the same area as the companies you are applying to? Yes, of course, but it is by no means a hindrance. Especially in today's perpetually-connected world with recruiters from ...


123

This new team member can be quoted as saying "It's not upon your employer to give you time to learn" and that we should all be doing this in our spare time at home. This new team member is confused. And unless this new team member is your boss, or is funding your paycheck, then this new team member can be safely ignored. If an employer wants you to ...


120

This is the mother of all red flags. Look for another job immediately. Don’t cover any expenses for the company (because they might never get paid). You are afraid that you lose your job if you don’t agree - but they want you to work without pay. You can agree to this if you can’t find a new job and only until you find something new, if it is made 100% ...


119

I know developers who successfully moved on towards a happier and more valuable developer career. They usually picked a special subject and worked to become an expert in that field. They also joined special projects that often lie outside of the classic corporate world. A few examples would be a friend who became a Linux developer joining RedHat, another ...


112

I can't believe no one has said this yet: Take. It. There are many people who say you should never disclose previous salary when applying for a new job, and some U.S. states have passed laws against asking for it, but ... but as a rule, many employers (at least in the U.S.) expect this. And they use it as a baseline for the salary they'll offer in the new ...


111

My question is how I can convey that I'll be actively pursuing external opportunities if I don't get this promotion without it sounding like a threat. You can't, because it is a threat. In reality, you gain nothing by announcing that you will be actively pursuing external opportunities. In fact, you are more likely to hurt yourself by doing so. If you ...


109

Short version: They might have chosen a reason that is not personal and not debatable It takes time to acquire skill as well as experience. You may be a good coder, but not experienced enough for their taste with handling projects, or they didn't think you were a good fit on the team. Have you considered that there might be multiple reasons for them not ...


109

If your goal is to help her develop professionally you should already be bringing this up with her. It sounds like you haven't. It is incredibly likely she will feel betrayed and view your inability to discuss this with her prior to leaving as a sign of your poor management skills. Particularly if you tell her, "oh those emails you write that are long? I ...


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