134

Two points: A degree is more than technical skills. Web Development "high-demand skills" go obsolete every 5 years. I've been around before Google existed. Hard to imagine, but the internet predated Google by multiple decades. I was in NGO organizations dealing with Netscape and IE5/6 compatibility issues as CSS started rolling out. Guess what? ...


61

A CS education (including a college degree) will teach you timeless concepts. It may use seemingly outdated languages for that, but it's the concepts that matter, not whether you place the semicolon at the end of the line or not. That is why you may think "this is not directly related to what I do right now". It isn't. It is related to the basic ...


23

While the other answers are good, they are extremely on the pro-degree side, and I think it's only fair to shine the light on the other side of the world. Is finishing my CS degree critical to being employable as a web developer if I already have good experience and an internship? First of all, single internship as nice as it is, is not equivalent to ...


16

You haven't mentioned your current location or the location that you plan to seek employment in in the future, and whether those two are the same, so I'll mention an aspect that might or might not be relevant to you: immigration. If this is not relevant to you - you can stop reading here. I landed my first job in IT after my second year of studies and had ...


15

I didn’t see this mentioned yet. A major reason for me to prefer hiring someone with a degree is because it proves someone can put their mind to something and finish it. It makes it more likely this person won’t leave on a whim. It’s also an indicator for the marshmallow test, will they be able to delay gratification. Obviously exceptions are there but the ...


14

Can you get a job in the future without finishing your degree? Yes. The more interesting question is should you. The answer to that one is more complicated, because it depends on you. Are you a 21-year old college junior? Finish your degree. It will be worth more over the span of your career (in terms of jobs with HR departments that absolutely require it ...


9

Would most companies auto-reject my as an applicant for not having a degree even if I have long-running experience with high-demand skills in web development? Yes most companies will reject you if you have no degree. To test this lookup 10 jobs for software development and check the requirements you'll find that a high percentage will require a degree. ...


9

No, not even a little bit. There are some dev jobs where having a degree makes a significant difference to your chances of getting hired, but for most of those, it isn't a CS degree that matters — it's a postgrad math degree, or a business degree, or an engineering degree, or some other specialized field that shows that you would be able to provide some kind ...


8

Find a niche where optimization is important and work toward career in that niche. The examples that came to my mind immediately are: Embedded development: faster and smaller code allows cheaper hardware and longer battery life. Size is often more valuable than speed, since RAM consumes power even when idle. Game development: faster algorithms allow ...


7

Most would not auto-reject you, since devs are usually in high demand. But if you have the chance to finish your degree, there is no point to drop out. It will always be an advantage to have a degree.


7

I've worked with lots of developers who have done just this for their careers of 20 or 30 years and more. I wouldn't be overly surprised if the vast majority of developers are like this - it's just that they are invisible as they are also not writing blogs or tweeting hot takes.


6

There is a huge, epic, difference between • Web development • Software engineering Web development is incredibly awesome, amazingly lucrative, wonderful, a great career, and an all-around great way to spend your worklife. But scripting web sites and doing css has no connection at all to things like programming airplanes to fly, programming cars to drive ...


5

This is a highly controversial subject you're asking about and on both sides choice supportive bias tends to play a huge role. Especially those who have spend 5 years of their lives getting a degree often feel the need to justify that investment. Having been in the position where we had to hire juniors and a short stint as a programming 'mentor' at a ...


5

It is understandable why you agreed, you want to be a team player but unfortunately your company took advantage of this. I would suggest you have a meeting with your manager immediately and put together an action plan, it could look something like: Remind your manager of your area of expertise and that it is not this current technology and that you only ...


4

Is participation in different bug hunting programs viable career path and source of income? As your sole source of income? Seem extremely unlikely, unless your expenses are very, very low. To determine the viability of the plan, try it for a few months and see if it covers your expenses.


4

This is a job, though a fairly rarefied one. Major enterprises (e.g. Dell, Home Depot) have dedicated performance engineering organizations that usually use expensive application performance management (APM) tools to monitor and optimize their applications. Big tech companies have the same that do tool creation and such - like Yahoo's Exceptional ...


4

Recruiters/engineers can stay irrational longer than you can afford to be unemployed. You would think that cool companies are smart, they do not discriminate based on education, your wardrobe, ... but truth is that most of the companies, including the good ones have biased heuristics when filtering candidates. In fact unfortunately you will learn in your ...


4

I've been in software development for 28 years now and am currently a Director and make hiring decisions. It is possible to learn a narrow set of skills pretty quickly and be useful in only that thing... but frankly there is a LOT of stuff people learn over 4 years of blood sweat and tears getting a degree that is easy to discount if you don't really sit ...


4

If you already feel like that then it's time for you to move on. You should not stay at a company where you are feeling undervalued or a job that will not give a you a chance to grow. Since you are are an IT person, skills growth is really important on the later days. And of course, as one of the comment said, don't quit your job right away, find a job that ...


3

Most of what you learn in a CS degree has negligible practical value, just like what you learn in any other pure science degree (e.g. physics). If you wanted to learn something practical, you should have studied software engineering not computer science, just as you would choose mechanical, electrical, civil or chemical engineering, not physics or chemistry. ...


3

To answer the actual question: Would most companies auto-reject my as an applicant for not having a degree even if I have long-running experience with high-demand skills in web development? Some companies will reject you for not having a degree. However, the follow on question is... who cares? You don't need more than one job at a time... so the real ...


3

A degree is not usually a hard requirement in webdev and you won't be "auto-rejected" for not having one. There are many people in the industry who don't have a degree and do well, so a degree tends to be more a proxy of ability. If you can demonstrate ability directly through experience and skill then obviously a degree is not critical. However, a ...


3

I think your problem is rooted in your own insecurity and probably unrealistic self-imposed expectations. You recognize this yourself. However I think your approach is totally the wrong one for this situation. You are a 'data scientist', your skills are different to the ones of your colleagues and there will a moment where they will rely on those skills to ...


3

The way I understand you problem is that you need to be trained in some technical areas. The most reasonable thing to do is to talk to your manager about this and ask for support. Depending on the specifics of the business, your manager should be able to find a good solution for you, possibly with the help of your colleagues. To be even more professional, ...


2

Without knowing much more about your boss, it seems there is a disconnect between you and your boss. You seem to be a technical person, who typically talks in terms of data throughput, storage, and bandwith. Your manager, meanwhile, talks in terms of cost and product. This is what a manager is paid to be concerned about. What you need to do is translate what ...


2

I will echo what other say but I suspect this was the idea all along. As you've said the other developers refused so what I think happened is that they first asked everyone who would be able to do the job and they all refused. Then they hired externally (you) and bait and switched you to do this job. This is what they wanted all along. So setting goals about ...


2

Self thaught programmer here, like others have said; it depends. First off, I have been very lucky in my carreer and was able to transition slowly from a business role to a developer role over many years, to the point where I was working as a full time dev. Secondly, I have spent a lot of my free reading and learning. Thirdly, I really like developing and I ...


2

I have no interest whatsoever about career development and fulfilled with the current work I am doing You're actually in demand in many places. Turnover is high with devs as many want to progress their careers or other reasons. Many govt and large corporations are quite happy to have someone quietly sit in the same role for a decade and churn out work. Just ...


2

While at the start i was pretty stoked, i'm feeling a bit underwhelmed now This sort of thing does happen. You seem like the type of person who wants to grow. Some other people want to keep their job. Similarly, there are companies with growth opportunities and there are companies without (or with growth opportunities in departments/teams/areas that are not ...


1

Can you get a job in software development without a degree! Sure! Story Time I have a CS degree from a Big 10 school known for engineering. In one of my first jobs after college, I worked at a 10-person shop with a brilliant developer of similar age who also didn't finish his degree because "there was nothing practical to learn." He could program ...


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