110

My question is how I can convey that I'll be actively pursuing external opportunities if I don't get this promotion without it sounding like a threat. You can't, because it is a threat. In reality, you gain nothing by announcing that you will be actively pursuing external opportunities. In fact, you are more likely to hurt yourself by doing so. If you ...


73

Just keep it simple and polite. Something like the following should do fine: Thank you for the opportunity you presented, accepting me for the interview. As a result of the interview, I understand that this particular job is not what I have in mind for my future professional development. Eventually (if it is the case) you might add: Please keep me ...


36

We cannot make your decision for you, you need to take the call. If you strongly feel like learning a(ny) new technology / domain is not aligned with your career path and not going to be helpful going forward, then engaging into such activities and assignments is not going to be very fruitful for you and the organization. The way out can be looking for ...


33

If you're really sure you won't be proceeding, the polite and professional thing to do is to tell them as quickly and unambiguously as possible, so they can disregard your application and focus their attention completely on any remaining candidates who are interested. Your first sentence is the signal. Just reword it, and you have your email: Thanks for ...


27

There is no value to be had for you to tell them that you will leave if you are not promoted. It just sounds like you are trying to determine how important you are to the organization. If they are not doing a good job keeping good people, they likely are not concerned with individuals in general. If they aren't attempting to keep the people you trust, you ...


18

My question is how I can convey that I'll be actively pursuing external opportunities if I don't get this promotion without it sounding like a threat. You don't need to convey anything about leaving at this point. Follow the sequence below: Ask for what you believe you're worth of (promotion, salary revision etc.). Start finding other opportunities when ...


13

how I can convey that I'll be actively pursuing external opportunities if I don't get this promotion without it sounding like a threat? By describing your goals, not your tactics. You'll likely be asked why you're going for the more senior position. Answer something like: I've been in {current role} for 2.5 years now. I've learned a lot, and I feel ...


13

We see this in all aspects of IT / IS industry. Companies want to test-drive data science, so they opt for one of two ways: 1) post job ad for a data scientist, but call it "Python Developer" or "Data Analyst".. and then lump 3 job roles into it (DBA, Analyst, Scientist), and offer them $50k 2) tell some tech person at work to go "learn data science".. ...


13

You roughly have two options: Thanks for the interest, but this role isn't for me. Thanks for the interest, but this role isn't for me. The fact is. I really wanted to work directly for you guys, but I was disappointed to learn that this position was only available through an intermediary agency. Option #1 is short and sweet. Use your own words if ...


11

First, you need to step back and evaluate what exactly you were hired to do. You stated that you were promised to be: acting as a developer but also some kind of mentor because their employees don't know about best practices and modern techniques If this is correct, then the work that you are currently doing is exactly what you were promised. One task ...


10

I can't speak for all professions, but in IT you have to learn something new all your life. It's an important part of our career to stay up to date with the latest trends. So, actually, it's totally normal to learn something new. There may not be a lot of web development work to do. You can refuse to learn AI if you don't want to, but in that case you'...


9

As sf02 said, you are doing parts of your job description: Development. Working on old code is often no fun, but also reality of software development. As senior dev, come up with a plan to improve the situation! Not only for you, but also for the employee. By your description, the current application is a source of never ending bugs. It seems, you have to ...


9

You really have to make up your mind what you want to do. "Continue working at the company as a web developer" doesn't seem to be one of the possibilities. So you have two choices: Choice 1: Jump head first into the subject of AI and do what you can to learn it. Don't do it for the company, do it for yourself. If you are lucky, you learn something new ...


9

The best way to handle this type of disconnect is to put a written career plan in place. These are pretty common these days and many companies already have a template for this. If not, there are plenty on the internet and you can just pick one you like. A career plan typically starts with some goals, a strength and weakness analysis, gaps against the goals,...


9

If they contact you again either to schedule another interview, or to send them references, then you should tell them that you are no longer interested. I prefer to send this message via email. It lets me control the length of the conversation, and it gives me time to come up with the exact phrases I want to use. You don't have to provide a lot of ...


9

Remaining longer than X at a company typically does not hurt your future chances at other jobs. It's job hoppers (staying regularly for short stints only, less than say 2 or even 1 year) that can get problems from their job history. That's not a total given either, in some specific roles/CVs that's also generally okay (e.g., very project driven roles). If ...


8

When I was in school, the thought of a man-portable device that can communicate with any other human on the planet was in the same league as plasma beam weapons, space dreadnoughts, mind-reading aliens and "The Force". 25 years later and it's a 100$ device kids get for Christmas. Moral of the story? Don't try to predict the future. It's not worth the time....


5

My personal philosophy is to explore / exploit all opportunities of a place before moving on to another place - not limited to jobs, but to anything in life. Therefore, applied to your case, I would do the following (I actually did it several times): Ask for a new position in the current company. Being a new position, salary negotiation will most likely ...


5

Brain surgeons don't know the specifics of heart surgery. Cardiac surgeons don't know the specifics of brain surgery. You shouldn't expect yourself to know every technology stack that comes down the pipe or to be proficient in every programming language that exists. Study the technology that's relevant to your job. Study one or two things that are valuable ...


4

Practically speaking, it is not possible to master everything that comes in the market. Any suggestions here would really help. TL;DR - You don't need to know every technology, you need to be capable of finding a solution to a problem. Simply "knowing" the technologies won't help, if that cannot be applied to find out a solution. It is practically ...


4

Generally you don't "keep up". You learn the tech stack your company uses and that's all you ever need. Until you change jobs. All you need to do is be aware of the technologies, frameworks, what they do and when to use them. You don't waste time trying to learn them all because you probably wont get to use them, or by the time you do something else will ...


4

Something else to consider: Often in web development they really using mean machine learning when they are asking for AI. If that is the case here (I would discuss with your management if you are unsure), that absolutely falls within the purview of Web Development, so I would definitely advise going for learning it as it will certainly benefit you going ...


4

I don't believe AI will ever be needed as an average web developer. The truth is most web developers will just use libraries or services to enable AI without really knowing what it is. You certainly wont need to know the science/maths behind it. However, you have been given an opportunity to learn one of the hottest topics currently in the tech industry. ...


4

It seems to me that your job is about how I would expect a (European) government job to be like (you said it is not directly government, but the government is their only customer, so this comes to the same). You have high job security (probably excellent benefits as well, especially compared to the US) and low stress but the technology used is decades out of ...


3

I have 1.4 year experience in web development both on front-end and back-end. So you are a very junior software developer. Perhaps just a code monkey (and these are risking their job a lot more than genuine software developers, because by definition they are easily replacable; the economical value of software is concentrated on software design aspects, and ...


3

If you're on a performance improvement plan, then your best plan of action is to immediately start looking for another job. Look hard, you're going to be unemployed soon. Everyone gets assigned crappy projects. What separates the seniors from the juniors is what they do with the project. If you can go into some scary old spaghetti code and make the ...


3

They are much the same as they have been for many years. Most people are promoted into management. That can start as being the team lead. Then on to project management. Then all the way up the food chain to head of a department. A few people will be promoted into a "subject matter expert" role. But these may be rare in commercial organizations. All ...


3

TL;DR Don't worry about it. I started interviewing new employers after 1.5 years on my first job. My notice period was one month, increasing to three months on the second year. During the course of interviewing my current employer, I crossed that threshold, and so I told the new employer my notice period is now three months. I was just as worried as you ...


2

Even the most employee-centric companies are still focused on getting work done, at the end of the day. While it's nice when employers help you grow, that is almost universally a secondary goal, at best. It sounds like you have an idea of the direction you want to develop in, which is a good starting point. But, you need to make sure that growth fits with ...


2

You are a knowledge worker. To succeed in your career you need to learn new things continuously. (20 years from now will anybody use JS/Angular? I started programming using FORTRAN and assembly language on a PDP-11, now not very useful skills.) Your decision about your next job assignment should be based, in part, on what you can learn. In your present ...


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