218

Ignoring the fancy language, the company is essentially asking you to take a cut in pay. This is not uncommon, especially when companies are not doing well. From your description, it sounds like you are worried that if you don't agree to the pay cut, you'll be let go. If you want to keep your job, or you think you'll have difficulty finding another job ...


205

Please note that this answer is based on the original post and comments, which described a completely different context than after the edits. The original question was mainly based on a misunderstanding by the OP. Someone has to say it.. Do not join the new company! You didn't even start and they are already blackmailing you! It's completely unreasonable ...


204

Is this normal? In my experience, this is not normal. What typically happens is your employer would work with you in the transition by supporting you with training. Or alternatively, you employer could allow you a bit more time to do tasks in this new technology to account for the learning curve. I will say however, as a developer myself, it is on me ...


173

As an introvert SE, I have my style of doing things and getting things done. Same here. But an introvert isn't a protected class, nor is it a disability, so anywhere you work isn't going to start running to make special considerations for you based on the fact you "just prefer to work in the zone". There's two angles I'd take here. Firstly, if any kind of ...


156

Don't think about them. That company is living rent free in your head right now. Just throw them out and move on. I too have given free rent to a former company, and it was hard to forget them. But I mostly have now, and I am better for it. That company will likely go belly up soon anyways if they can't keep any talent at all. And the problem with ...


135

Like it or not, social or "soft" skills are more critical than you think. While I absolutely do not subscribe to the idea that a person's thought and behavior can be boiled down to a few letters, being an INTJ or an introvert does not preclude you from being a good workmate. Promotions always come with an increase in responsibility and almost universally ...


123

This new team member can be quoted as saying "It's not upon your employer to give you time to learn" and that we should all be doing this in our spare time at home. This new team member is confused. And unless this new team member is your boss, or is funding your paycheck, then this new team member can be safely ignored. If an employer wants you to ...


120

This is the mother of all red flags. Look for another job immediately. Don’t cover any expenses for the company (because they might never get paid). You are afraid that you lose your job if you don’t agree - but they want you to work without pay. You can agree to this if you can’t find a new job and only until you find something new, if it is made 100% ...


111

My question is how I can convey that I'll be actively pursuing external opportunities if I don't get this promotion without it sounding like a threat. You can't, because it is a threat. In reality, you gain nothing by announcing that you will be actively pursuing external opportunities. In fact, you are more likely to hurt yourself by doing so. If you ...


79

Being in India (but Europe would be the same in that respect), if you have 60 days notice period, the company can force you to work for 60 days for them and not work for any other company for those 60 days. You could of course offer a shorter notice period and it might be accepted, but if it is not accepted, there is nothing you can do. I know that. You ...


74

Congratulations on been selected for the job! You got hired because, you showed results of what you are capable of. Don't pretend to know things you don't. Be aware: others are also fighting imposter syndrome. You are not alone. This industry continually evolves. Everyone has to keep learning, or they fall behind. There will always be someone who knows ...


74

Just keep it simple and polite. Something like the following should do fine: Thank you for the opportunity you presented, accepting me for the interview. As a result of the interview, I understand that this particular job is not what I have in mind for my future professional development. Eventually (if it is the case) you might add: Please keep me ...


73

Would it be time-wasting to apply? Yes - you say yourself you don't want the role and want your boss to have it. Or is it an opportunity to increase my profile in the organization? Yes, but not in a good way - either you make it clear that you never wanted the position anyway (in which case you'll rightfully be seen as a timewaster) or you'll look like ...


68

That's unusual and inappropriate behavior from the HR person. Regardless of what issues your colleague has, that needs to be dealt with behind closed doors and out of sight of any other employees. Ask your manager for advice. Tell him the facts of the story and ask for her/his interpretation and what he/she expects you to do.


68

One thing that I like to tell people is that "A diagnosis is not a destiny" For some background, I am autistic, LD, hearing impaired, and have had a lifetime of ill health, so this is not a "toughen up, buttercup" speech from someone who hasn't lived through it himself. In fact, as a quintessential outlier myself, I heartily understand what you are going ...


65

In my opinion (not sure of the US law, IANAL), someone's pregnancy status has nothing to do with a new job or job application. It's a part of human life - no one is going to mark you as dishonest for availing the maternity leave (assuming you are entitled1) when you need it. The organization you want to work for, should support you in your life events, too. ...


64

First off, that you spent six years of your life pursuing your passion shows tenacity. That you knew when to cut your losses shows good sense. I know it's disappointing that things didn't work out, but there's nothing to be ashamed of in failing to start a career as a novelist. It's a brutally hard and arbitrary industry, and any worthwhile employer should ...


59

Manager asked me to reconsider my resignation and he sounded quite convincing, should I listen to him? Unless he presented a written offer, that included the increased salary you should not be convinced of anything other than "business as usual". Any manager that has the desire and means to give you what he has "promised" would have already done so. ...


52

The writing is on the wall. In Big Neon Letters: sorry, you have no future there. Your company is very nice and transparent about this. They treat you fairly and offer you a very generous deal. Take it and focus on the next adventure in your career. Edit: Just to elaborate, there are two things going on here Your company isn't doing well: They may recover ...


50

Good companies invest in their staff. Technology is a rapidly changing industry - there is always something new to learn. It is much cheaper to keep a current member of staff up to standard than to replace them with a new hire, which costs time and money in recruitment and getting up to speed. Good companies recognize this, and provide their staff with ...


50

Most of the time, the nicest way is to be straightforward. If this happens in middle of a running conversation, just say: Excuse me if you got confused by the tone of the voice, but I'm Mr. X here, not miss X. Another way, lead the conversation by saying: "Hello, Mr.X here / speaking" include the salutation on purpose so as to leave no room for ...


49

Answering from the northwestern US, I've switched between languages and frameworks multiple times in the last 10 years. ColdFusion, ASP Classic, ASP.NET (both C# and VB), .NET Core, right now I'm working a project in JavaScript/Cordova/React, smaller side jobs in Python and Ruby, Bash (with sed and awk) etc. It would help to know your country, but in my ...


48

From the "mandatory employer-part for public transportation" and standard 35/h per week, and the fact that your profile say you are in France, I am assuming that your job was also in France. Having a 37.5/h week contractually is fairly standard but has to come with compensation (namely, extra days off, or "RTT" 1). In the same way, you mandatory 50% payment ...


44

It might have been a negative experience for you personally, but it was relevant work exprience nevertheless (or at least it could be sold as such to a hiring manager). And if you leave it off, you might have to answer questions about the apparent 7 month gap in your employment.


43

Caveat: I’m coming from a US mindset where jobs are largely at will and most employers are fairly tight-lipped about what they’ll say about a former employee, though small companies tend to not be as careful. Hiring companies vary in how likely they are to check references and unless they know someone at a former employer would rarely reach out to that ...


36

Doesn't matter in which part of the world you maybe, Always, always always make it clear to your future perspective employers how long your current notice period is before you start interviewing with them. Kind of agree with what Chris says, no business is going to get lost in 15 days unless it's NASA and you have to pack yourself in an Astronaut Suit, fly ...


36

We cannot make your decision for you, you need to take the call. If you strongly feel like learning a(ny) new technology / domain is not aligned with your career path and not going to be helpful going forward, then engaging into such activities and assignments is not going to be very fruitful for you and the organization. The way out can be looking for ...


34

Okay: Back story, I had a stroke and couldn't work for 5 years. So, here's how you do it. You can brush up, and get recent experience by doing volunteer work. If you need to work somewhere to at least have an income, work retail, or fast food, or wherever so you have some income. To get some skill back, I did volunteer work for a hospital. Then, what I ...


33

If you're really sure you won't be proceeding, the polite and professional thing to do is to tell them as quickly and unambiguously as possible, so they can disregard your application and focus their attention completely on any remaining candidates who are interested. Your first sentence is the signal. Just reword it, and you have your email: Thanks for ...


30

In the United States they can't ask, even if you are visibly pregnant. But since you aren't pregnant there is zero reason to tell them your plans. You will not be dishonest by keeping this private, even if it turns out you are already pregnant. One thing to consider before deciding to switch companies, understand what leave you have with your current ...


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