New answers tagged

1

Don't leave a job unless you've got something better to go to. (some jobs are so bad that being unemployed may be better, but this doesn't apply to you) Tell your boss that you would be happy to accept his offer, and would like more development if it becomes available but in the meantime you're interested in learning any aspect of the industry that you can. ...


3

Engineering and management do not have much in common. Although you can learn about management as an engineer, by interacting with the managers, it will not be enough, usually. You can try my approach: move from pure engineer / developer to team lead / (software) project manager. Once you have good experience with that (it can be as little as one year, ...


0

Management? If you lead a team of engineers/developers/... you might be focusing mainly on design and the other points you gave, and they take care of the ground work. Of course your experience is important so that you know how to guide them and also are able to check and, if needed, correct their work, but you will do less "nitty-gritty work". If you can ...


0

With very few exceptions, companies and managers really like people who ask for more responsibility. So don't be shy about asking. You have a First in physics: you don't have to scrape and beg to be taken seriously in your desire to do technical work. You have valuable habits of mind and systemic understanding, and your degree proves it. Frame the ...


3

A couple of observations about your situation. "Infrastructure coordinator" can also mean Dev Ops. That field has plenty of software engineering involved with it. And, it's a fabulous opportunity to learn about how things really work, both in software and in your company. With respect, your dislike of it may be unjustified. Dev Ops people are in strong ...


2

Start by presenting your profile to someone outside the company. You probably have no idea whether you are employable as an entry level developer or not. Your skillset could be anywhere from that of a solid junior developer to a high school kid who knows just for loops and it is difficult to tell the difference without some form of outside feedback. This ...


2

If you can write good code in any language, you can write good code in any language. It is true that your experience with certain technologies will help you get on board with companies who are still using those technologies. Be advised that old technologies are still more common than you may at first have thought; my company's flagship product is coded in ...


0

What you've described doesn't sound like a "old technologies" problem. Old technologies are great - they're almost all I use and I've made a lot of money with them. Out of date stuff isn't the end of the world as long as you control the deployment environment, which this company seems like it does. The concern from me comes from point 5 - the Copying and ...


2

I can seem like a team player without inviting the massive disadvantages No, this can't be faked long term. I want to get to the level where I get to put people on the firing line This isn't a dev level that you reach, it's a management role. To get people hired and fired you would need a personal contact at that level or higher that will do it for you.


2

The way to be perceived as a team player is to do the things that make you visible as being a good team player, rather than being a good IC which is what you are now. Team players do things that elevate the whole team instead of letting others fail and saying that their stuff worked so it's not their problem. Being a solid IC can get you to the senior ...


6

However, I want to get to the level where I get to put people on the firing line and replace them with more competent ones. That requires that I at least have the veneer of getting along with incompetents. Getting underperformers fired is part of a managers job, if you want to do that you should become one. If you don't want to do that you should rely ...


-3

One thing that hasn't been covered is that the career development might make staying more attractive. Not necessarily forever, but perhaps for a few years. In fact, this might be a retention offer. Editing on the advice of DarkCygnus: 1) I assumed that this advice is also intended for posterity. People in the far future (like the 2020's) will come by ...


1

I don't know about the particular circumstances of the German job market, but if I were you I would accompany the CV with a cover letter, where I would explain the reasons for the career change and why I would be a good hire for the company. For instance you could highlight that, because of your past experience, you can negotiate with stake-holders, manage ...


2

How to get over constant comparison? There is no comparison. Your peers chose to move abroad and you did not. If you want to move abroad, then do it! You can't control what your peers do but you can control what you do. Don't worry about things that are out of your control. Focus on what you can control and everything should work out.


1

and probably more in first world countries That is putting it mildly. How do I stop constantly comparing and focus on my job right now? Why stop? Just do your job in such a way that it keeps that option open for the future. Add "may go to Canada" as part of your career goals and act accordingly. Your first job is a stepping stone to your next one.


8

It can be hard to not be envious of people who seem to have a more successful career than you, but you have to remember: you are not those people. You don't know what they've been through, or if their life would even make you happy. You may be motivated by different things than they are, and you can't really ever be certain about any of that. No matter how "...


4

If I apply there, they definitely would consult their incubated company which I know they do and would have to face this company. That would require a higher level of HR organizational skill than most places have, so unless the company is small enough for them to go ask the relevant people personally, don't worry about it. My friend worked at a major ...


5

This one is easy to answer: With a permanent job, you will of course not be leaving. Without a permanent job, you will feel free to look around. (Having a permanent job will of course not stop you from doing what’s best for you, but you don’t have to tell them that).


1

You told your employer (via your boss) that you may be resigning in a few (eight) months. Your decision to resign depends on you passing (or not) the exam. In the meantime, you would like to enjoy the benefits of a full-time position. Since you are studying for the IELTS, as you said, you're probably familiar with the saying: "You can't have your cake and ...


-1

In the comments you mention that you either become permanent or your contract will end. That leaves you with three options: Choose between your job and school in Australia Lie. Tell them you've given up on Australia and then stop talking about Australia around coworkers. If you get accepted, then you can choose Australia, but this will probably burn ...


1

As an academic, your skills will be very appreciated by the industry (R&D roles) What can I do to make my profile appealing? Your conditions are not so harsh as you think. You are young and PhD in ICMEg (which is an engineering by itself, which means it has industrial utility). My only concern is that you will not be able to enter a leadership or ...


0

You are not a Fraud. Because you have had three internships doing software engineering. Which a lot of students doing computer science do not always get the opportunity to do so. Plus, if you were a real fraud, you would have not even gotten those internships in the first place. Because everyone knows that interview problems for software engineering are ...


0

I've been working as a software developer for seven years - and one of my key learnings of the last couple of years is that software development requires all kinds of people. The immediate thing people think of is the gun '10x' genius developer, or the 'clean code, best practises' developer - and yes - generally it's good to have those developers on your ...


13

It sounds like you've got a case of imposter syndrome which is so common, the Harvard Business Review wrote that article in the link. Take a few words of wisdom from an old graybeard self-taught hacker. EVERYONE IS FAKING IT Every last person in IT from the infancy of the industry has been making it up as they go. IT is more of an art than a science, ...


1

A very difficult question, a very simple answer: Start your own software projects in your spare time (e.g. on saturdays/sundays) Because you do not only have a lack of confidence, but even more so a lack of practice (speed = practice, that's it). Still, software engineering is not just another job, its a way of life, being constantly on your edge, ...


3

Looking at the objective facts in your post, I am not sure you have reason to be concerned. You are about to get a degree in software engineering (+) You have work experience (+) Some interns were faster than you (-) You were unable to fix bugs in complex legacy code on your own (very slight -) You were congratulated on your progress (+) Somebody was ...


-2

You can be good at one thing, or mediocre at many. iOS is now 13 years old. It's based on MacOS X, which was about six years old at the time iOS started. MacOS X was based on NextStep which was about 8 years old when MacOS X started. iOS is not going to go away for the next ten years; iPhones and iPads are not going away at all and if there is anything new,...


7

Broader expertise is usually viewed as better unless they're looking for a specialist. In which case 6 years is plenty of expertise already. That is just generally though, companies and individuals may differ.


2

It's OK But going to HR for a promotion is probably about as useful as going to Facilities and Maintenance for a promotion. HR should only get involved if the company is illegally discriminating against your promotion because you are in a protected class. Otherwise, HR has pretty much zero business telling business units whether to promote a particular ...


2

I'm going to tell you something you might not want to hear: you might not currently deserve the promotion. Here's why I say that: applying elsewhere. I had a few tries, but other companies will take me at my current level and not at the next one. I would have to "work all over again". I could apply more, too. ... you're a senior dev. Your company ...


3

Generally, the exact same way you'd respond if you weren't an intern and were just a regular employee seeking a job elsewhere. In other words, diplomatically and as far away from 'Here are all the reasons I'm not happy here' as possible. You're not leaving because of reasons X, Y, and/or Z. You're leaving because you got a great opportunity with ...


0

Engage HRBP That's "HR Business Partner" in corporate-speak. I think scenarios like this are literally what they are for. Just tell them that you feel you aren't getting candid feedback from your manager and that you feel he treats you differently from the rest of the team. Not in a professionally inappropriate way, but in a way that perhaps suggests ...


10

[Bob] told me that my manager doesn't like me very much, but he beat around the bush when I asked why and said I shouldn't be knowing that. I know he's your friend, but Bob (that's what I'll call this "other higher up") is being a bit of an arse. In all seriousness, this is a really crappy situation to put you in. If he wasn't comfortable telling you ...


5

They might just not like you personally, but be perfectly capable - aside from appearing cold - to not let that influence their professional evaluation. I don't particularly like a few colleagues personally either, but absolutely respect their professional competency and work well with them together. I'd just not invite them to a tea party. And that's ...


-1

Short answer: ask that manager, respectfully. Then listen carefully. Then ask for advice on what you can do to change the situation.


-1

Hard to resolve if the one method you have for finding out the “why” is off the table. I would seek a transfer or a new job. Or if you’re content with what you’re doing just ride it out for now. He may leave or his feelings towards you may change.


2

There is no harm in shopping around I do not see why you would not be diligently applying. Job applications have very little risk, especially if done reasonably. I had a few tries, but other companies will take me at my current level and not at the next one. I would have to "work all over again". I could apply more, too. This may indicate that you are ...


-1

My answer is yes, and here's my reason. A bit of background: I hear you on this since it's a problem I've faced in my own time. I'm weaker on the backend, but I have a decent working knowledge to spin up a server, connect a DB, and build out some basic API routes when needed. I work with Android, iOS, and Web on a day to day basis. Now to why I said 'yes,...


2

Talk to your manager, privately. Ask his advice about this situation. "Boss, I don't have a strong relationship with my peers; I don't interact with them very much for work. Do you think that's a problem? Do you think I should find ways to develop stronger bonds with that team? If so, can you suggest some ways to do that." This does a few things for you ...


-1

Should I also try dive in backend? Hence slow down process of my development in front end ? You be a full stack developer, but heavier on the frontend than backend. You'll be at better frontend development if you also understand backend development and vice versa. The more you can understand the full stack even from a high level point of view, the better ...


5

You described your concerns as, But this exactly my concern is, if I have negative perceptions about them, they might be thinking the same way about me. Would this affect my reputation in organisation? Would my manager be affected by this? with whom I have an excellent professional relationship. Any time you have concerns based on assumptions or indirect ...


1

But if the interviewer asks what would be my plan upon the completion of internship, how should I properly answer this question? Should I not mention about graduate studies at all? I think you should be honest and tell them about your studies (as that shows interest in learning), but that doesn't mean you are closing the doors for a full-time offer by ...


0

Yes, it is entirely normal and expected in a small company that you'll be engaged in a variety of tasks outside your formal job description (or, alternatively, to have a very broad remit in one's job description). This one of the key differences between small and large organisations.


2

Whether any work assignment is normal or not, heavily depends on the sector / domain, the industry and finally, the organization policies. While a practice may be common in some cases, it might not be the norm in some organization, and vice-versa. The real question is: are you willing to put your efforts into the work you don't really want to do or enjoy ...


0

With that said, given my goal of being a jack-of-all-trades application developer, is it likely pursing will pigeonhole me into data science-adjacent pursuits, especially given my data engineering background? Or is it likely the experience will be transferrable? Probably neither. It seems unlikely you would be pigeonholed if you add machine learning ...


5

You don't mention your age, but 4 - 5 years in one field suggests you haven't been doing this professionally for all that long? That said, there's no rule that you can't be disinterested in a career path at any point. I'm a developer myself and in a similar mindset to you, but in my case, I've been working in the industry for 16 years since I graduated. ...


1

In the contrary, you should be happy you are not forced to do support and your responsibility lies only in developing a new system. Probably they let you in there so you won't leave running for greener pastures, had they asked you to do support. In any case, if you see that your skillset has stop expanding with your current role, maybe you should start ...


4

Tell your recruiter I am the go-to technical expert on my company's mission-critical app, responsible to our government customers and their citizens. When asked why you want to change jobs, say that you're always learning new things and the new job offers you a great way to do that. Ypu could say the same sort of thing to your current manager, and ...


0

Since management is not offering any new kind of work to you I would take the initiative myself to identify processes/workflows that can be improved, then come up with a game plan on how to implement it with rough timelines. This way you can choose what you want to learn and grow in. Once you have a plan figuered out you can pitch it to your manager and see ...


2

I am a kind of person who always look for something challenging and I am not getting it. Question is: what did you do go get something challenging? Did you talk to your manager about this? Did you explore the problems that you or your organization may have (other than assigned works) and did any brainstorming to come up with ways to solve them? This can ...


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