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0

First rule : Don't leave a job without having another one lined up. The most important thing to do is to not let your skills die out with time. I would highly recommend joining online competitions on coding(will be difficult, but atleast your programming skills will be sharp), then what you want to do is to join one or few Open-Source projects which use ...


2

You may be looking in the wrong place. HPC in industry is a tool, not an objective in its own right. You need to look for businesses that are doing engineering or similar work and want their calculations to go faster. It may help to position yourself as a scientific programmer rather than an HPC specialist.


1

The more time passes without you doing work in your preferred field the more your skills in that field are likely to atrophy. I suppose you could write open source projects in that field or write papers or blog about it or something, in your free time, to stay current, but, barring that, a time will probably come when you're just not up-to-speed enough to ...


-1

You did not ask the most important question (yet, you should now), which most of the answers just assume one way or the other: "Is the company unable or unwilling to pay your full salary?" If they are unwilling, you can begin a discussion about your performance, or the performance of the product. The former is a serious discussion; the latter is not, ...


-1

I'd like to offer you a different perspective here, because there is great opportunity here if you're smart about it. For easy math, I'm going to say that you're paid 5k a month, and they're wanting to retain 2k a month. What you are doing is, quite literally, loaning this company 2k a month until they pay you back. This means you're no longer just an ...


1

Run. I've been in that situation twice (once (in the USA) where an offer was made to "keep working for a fraction of your salary, and we'll pay you later" and once (in Europe) where they just didn't pay anyone salary at the end of the month and made promises 'the company will be sold, the new owners will backpay'). In both cases, I quit. Rightly so, ...


1

When you say Europe, I'm going to assume you mean the Schengen Area. Even without visas being an issue, there are other barriers that need to be taken into account on both sides regarding international workers that wouldn't normally be an issue with local workers. Relocation costs, tax issues and language barriers (as you have noted) immediately come to ...


-1

They're giving you a paycut. I'd probably leave. At the very least I would not accept it without alternative compensation. Ask what they want to reduce it to, and ask for stock in exchange at the most recent valuation. To be vested at the rate your salary would accrue. If they say no, its time to walk.


3

If you seriously believe the company has a future, then you can consider asking for a compensation in the form equity (aka "sweat equity"). This also help showing your belief in the company, and your "investment".


1

I have worked to improve over 400 companies that are failing like yours. You must ask that the retained money be put into a trust account that will be turned over to you as soon as the company fails (it will fail). When they don't agree to that you know the executives are paying themselves full salary times two using your retained money as they go bankrupt....


-1

So they want you to accept a pay cut, but they don't say how much, nor for how long,or whether you'll ever get your money back, and keep your job. I'm unfamiliar with Indian labour law, and how easy it is to lay off somebody. But it is of the essence that you leave this job ASAP, and find something with more stability, even if it's not quite as exciting, or ...


6

Them expecting you to take a pay-cut until (at least) the end of the year is massive red flag. Maybe they are validly losing their shirt (i.e. business wasn't as good as it seemed). Or, other awful scenarios... Someone is trying to legally cook the books to make the company look more profitable then it is (e.g. to sucker new investors to invest, to sucker ...


9

The ways you potentially can lose the "retained" money: Bankruptcy: there's pretty much no way to protect against this Termination: do you get the money if they fire you? Resigning: do you get the money if you resign? "Eventual" (i.e. never) repayment: there really should be a fixed end date, not "'at least' until" Interest: if they keep the money for a ...


8

Something else you might consider negotiating about: can you cut back your hours by however much your pay is being cut? Then there won't be any awkward dispute down the line about whether the company is finally doing well enough to start paying you back the considerable funds they'd owe you by then. And then also it'd ensure that while not instantly ...


0

If you have a friend that is in your same field and is very knowledgeable. Send them the job description for the job you want. Ask them to read it over, and then set up a phone call and pretend to interviews for that job with your friend. This will help you prepare and your friend will be able to provide you with honest helpful feed back.


120

This is the mother of all red flags. Look for another job immediately. Don’t cover any expenses for the company (because they might never get paid). You are afraid that you lose your job if you don’t agree - but they want you to work without pay. You can agree to this if you can’t find a new job and only until you find something new, if it is made 100% ...


216

Ignoring the fancy language, the company is essentially asking you to take a cut in pay. This is not uncommon, especially when companies are not doing well. From your description, it sounds like you are worried that if you don't agree to the pay cut, you'll be let go. If you want to keep your job, or you think you'll have difficulty finding another job ...


17

I was told that this is going to be the case for at least till December of 2019 owing to poor performance of the product in market. You need to pose certain questions to the management: What happens if unfortunately, the situation doesn't change by December 2019? What if it gets worse? What about the potential opportunity lost where you could have invested ...


0

I am not sure what you want to prepare for. Stupid questions? Do you really want to work for a company which is not even able to handle an interview properly? I "interviewed" once of r a company. Almost all questions were sequences of big numbers (5+ digits) and I was supposed to guess the next. I was happy I failed ;) I had no desire to become a ...


3

Ambition is one thing. Being the right person for the job is another. Whether or not somebody else is better suited for the job is irrelevant. What you need to consider is what kind of message you give to management. Considering that you're the newest, the youngest, and presumably the least experienced, would you come across as someone who is over-ambitious?...


6

If you want to role, and you think you are suitable for the role, you should apply. Don't worry about other candidates, think about how you would fit the role. You need to think about if you have the kind of experience they are after. Do you have the required skill set? If you are going into that interview very under-qualified then, yes, that would be bad ...


0

While I like the other answer, I will suggest another direction based on my direct experience. Since you're exiting University as a qualified professional, I'd advise you to look for trainee programs and similar things, especially from big companies. You'll get the chance to test your leadership skills in a more controlled environment and have a support ...


11

As someone who will be going through a series of internships in the next few years, how can I capitalize on this? How can I phrase a request to my supervisor for them to; put an endorsement on my linkedin, or write a paragraph that I can put in a longform CV I make available to employers I apply to? And what sorts of things should I ask my ...


8

You can ask your colleague for a note on LinkedIn now, and ask him/her to be a long-term reference at the end of your internship. Recommendations belong in recommendation letters or personal conversations between recruiters and past colleagues - not on your resume. If you feel comfortable, there's no reason to delay asking for a LinkedIn comment from your ...


3

Wait till nearly the end of your internship and ask for a written recommendation. This way they can highlight your total successes and quality of work. Once they have given it to you, you can ask that if they have time to hit your linkedin page for a few endorsements. It may be wise to keep a running log of projects and milestones you have completed so ...


-1

I doubt you'll be able to take over the position of 'rising star' in your present company. If you're ambitious, look to move elsewhere.


4

Ask them for a full time job, see what they think of the idea. If you get the job then it's all good, keep it until you land an internship next summer. Do not quit this job until you're certain you're being accepted into one of the big companies. There is a lot of competition for companies like Google, Microsoft and Amazon so be mindful when it comes to ...


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