New answers tagged

5

First of all, pro tip: Care less. Jobs are different than school/university. In an educational setup, it's possible to get everything 100% right, there IS always a way to get it right. In a job, not so much. Relax, you are doing a lot to improve. Spending your weekends on coding is in no way "expected". This shows a lot of dedication! Most probably ...


1

I'll answer this from the perspective of someone who is also non-Japanese whose first job out of university was for a large company in Japan who had a similar experience to your own. So I understand a bit about where you're coming from (in my experience, I believe I was hired exclusively because of my race and language skills, I am a White Canadian ...


-1

I would suggest that the op would see a licensed therapist that would help them to get a grip on their problems. This answer is given in light that the op has mentioned having autism in their previous question: How can I find work in a new sub-field that I have invented for my profession?. I think other answers miss this point by giving suggestions (however ...


2

"Unique" is not a synonym for "Useful" or "Valuable", if your "unique" skill is truly one or both of those things then you need to be able to convince others of that. Otherwise what you have is like the ability to be invisible so long as no-one is watching - i.e. pointless. I'll try to get too bogged down in the ...


8

I have the ability to work with meaning in source code. I have never met or heard of someone else able to do this. This depends on your definition of "meaning". Just because you establish a meaning of the source code (which is just instructions on how to process or handle data, by the way) doesn't mean to work with that meaning. I think my ...


5

I have the ability to work with meaning in source code. I have never met or heard of someone else able to do this. Information Theory is an incredibly broad field, and I'd expect you to have published papers in this field if you've got ideas that are so revolutionary that only your mind could have formulated them. Us programmers are generally an introverted ...


6

You think you have a great idea but it's not catching on and you don't get any traction. There are a few potential root causes Your idea is not as relevant to real world problems as you think it is, You are not explaining it in a way that people understand the benefits, or You are talking to the wrong people: either at the wrong spot on the org chart or ...


-1

Do you think you need to keep practising your programming skills to do a good job as a tech lead? If so there's no shame in carving out a fraction of your time for development. Treat it as sacred as anything else you feel like you "must" do. If this leaves too little time for all the other tasks people expect of you, the problem is not with your ...


-2

If you want to have a technical leadership role and at the same time, still wants to be hands on, you could consider the role of a Software Architect. The definition and interpretation of this role varies across companies, still in general, it is seen as very positive if an Architect could still code. The key difference of the role of Architect with that of ...


3

Unless you are overwhelmed from just managing the project and team, I didn't really get what is stopping you from coding. I can think of 2 ways you can also code while managing your team: Assign some coding work to yourself too. Review and refactor the code of your junior developers. (The second option would be better as you will learn how your developers ...


1

If I were you I would have a frank conversation with my manager: I wanted to move to the next level because I wanted a higher salary. But the nature of the work has changed and I’m really not enjoying it. I would like to spend more time coding, and I feel like my level of productivity justifies the higher salary, even if I’m not a “force multiplier”. Can you ...


7

These 2 quotes may help guide you. Steve Wozniak (Apple): To this day I'll stay at the bottom of the org chart as an engineer because that is where I want to be. Mark Twain (Author): Find a job you enjoy doing, and you will never have to work a day in your life. If you loved development, and if you tried and don't enjoy another career path, then there's ...


5

Rethink your concept of engineering As a techie, you're naturally focussed on producing good code. But... As a senior engineer, you're actually focussed on producing a good design. The code could be any appropriate language you like to implement that design, and if you moved to a new place then you could redo that design with their favoured language. C++, C#,...


1

As someone who hit this issue, and beat it, in a parallel sphere of work, this is my hastily compiled list of top tips..... hope it helps!! Companies differ a lot, and there are other ways to build a career path than the one you have in mind, that may suit you far better. I moved early on, from a large to a smaller company (SME). A large company needs a ...


3

Other answers are good, I just want to address this specific point: I’m scared that in some time I will become worthless, I will be that guys that just lead and don’t know nothing about code, new technologies and so on. Consider the idea that scarcity increases the value of something. In software development, most engineers want to keep their heads down ...


5

Tech lead can be an awesome job. You just need to make it that way. I don’t do more code and just a little technical stuff (what is funny when you consider the name of the position). You are the one who owns the technical bottom line. If you have to own it, you get to run it the way you want. A key part of this is deciding which activities are worth a tech ...


0

One of the things that should be the job of a tech lead is to steer the direction of the technology stack. That can be different from enterprise architecture, because EA is more about the big picture, but it is just as important. Take that recent excitement about log4j. Does your organization use it? And who made that decision? Are all your services/servers ...


7

Companies vary significantly in how far you can go as an individual contributor. In some places, there are a lot of strictly technical roles above the "senior developer" level. They include various flavors of "principal engineer" or "architect", etc. No matter what happens, as you advance your job will become less about ...


58

Is there a way out of this “destiny”? How can I stay updated and don’t become obsolete to the market? The role of Tech Lead varies from company to company (and sometimes from team to team within a company). I have worked in some companies where the Tech Lead was mostly a manager. And I have worked in some companies where the Tech Lead was basically just a ...


2

Initial days will be exactly like you have said. See if the below plan makes sense to you. While you assign/ explain tasks raise the bar of expectation from the dev. Example: Ask them to check how your competitor is doing the same thing. Ask them to brain storm and come up with solutions. You just be the devils advocate. Keep showing them holes in their ...


126

Yes indeed you have discovered why software development in general is not a very competitive environment: most developers love their profession (not their specific job, but that they are paid to develop software) and would not want to be promoted into a management position. As far as a "career" goes, you have to "advance" into management. ...


12

What you have to realize is that in general, your value to an organization multiplies when you can teach and lead more people. You can only get so much done coding, as opposed to teaching 20 people how to code right. So even on the “technical track,” many promotions and such have various sorts of mentoring and technical leadership requirements. You can: ...


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