New answers tagged

1

Tell them: you have nothing to lose There are four cases: If you tell them, and they hire you anyway, it's a great sign: that is a nice company, accommodating to your human life and needs. If you tell them, and they don't hire you… would you really want to work for them? If you do not tell them, they hire you, and then they do not make a fuss about it, it ...


-2

Too many people here are talking about legalities and sticking it to the man, swindle as much as you can. This is not the way to live life. The question you're asking is if it is ethical and moral to try and swindle and deceive a company that is going above and beyond to recruit you, with a massive 50k pay increase. I question the morals of the people ...


2

On the one hand I agree with the people who say "they don't need to know", however.... It sounds like they've already been very accomodating (if they've come to the party on all other detractors you've raised), so one more little issue shouldn't be a problem if thy're so desperate to have you. It might be worth giving some thought as to why you're even ...


4

You should consider what kind of rights you have around maternity pay etc. Certainly in the UK you must have worked for your employer for a certain amount of time before being entitled to the full amount of paternity/maternity pay.


2

My question is, should I tell the new company that I may be taking maternity leave within the first year of starting? The simple answer is NO. 1) you are not pregnant yet, and even if no fertility issues are known, it could happen tomorrow or only a year from now. 2) In many countries (I don't know about the US) it is illegal to ask or to fire someone if ...


30

In the United States they can't ask, even if you are visibly pregnant. But since you aren't pregnant there is zero reason to tell them your plans. You will not be dishonest by keeping this private, even if it turns out you are already pregnant. One thing to consider before deciding to switch companies, understand what leave you have with your current ...


11

Interesting situation. There is no need to tell them you’re trying to get pregnant. It’s your right to try, and their risk if it happens. To consider: what will your current company do if you get pregnant? Will you get maternity leave, get your job back when you return to work? Same at the new place? The new job seems an excellent opportunity even if it’...


6

should I tell them we're trying to get pregnant? Nope, this is no ones business but your own. Having said that, your new employer may not thrilled with you starting your, and then early on in your career with your new company needing to be off for maternity leave. Just keep that in mind as you make your career plans. If you get this new role, you may ...


64

In my opinion (not sure of the US law, IANAL), someone's pregnancy status has nothing to do with a new job or job application. It's a part of human life - no one is going to mark you as dishonest for availing the maternity leave (assuming you are entitled1) when you need it. The organization you want to work for, should support you in your life events, too. ...


0

Personally I find most 1-week courses a waste of time. By the time they come around I've already had to work out the basics, so the first couple of days don't teach me anything. The middle day is useful, then the last two cover stuff I'm never going to use. Instead you could go to a conference. These give you short introductions to lots of new ideas and ...


0

Some good ideas in the other answers already. Another topic for training could be advanced software testing. Such as how to write good (unit) tests for components that interact with external APIs and possibly unstable network connections.


1

Company training dollars are extremely underutilized Company training money is often budgeted for and just not used. At my company, permanent employees (So unfortunately not me as we seem to be contract to hire) are eligible for $2000 a year in training. And it is apparently very easy to get. Seriously, don't get a $50 course with this opportunity. Have ...


1

I would recommend gaining some knowledge in cloud computing space by studying and exploring services provided by popular cloud vendors like AWS, MS Azure. This will be helpful not only in your current role but it will also increase your future job prospects since Cloud skills are really sought after these days. If you are already on cloud then you can ...


2

If you have to choose one, The most natural feeling technology to add to your current set will be some RDBMS tech (PostGres, MySQL, SQL Server etc).


4

You need to earn their trust and respect as individuals (or at least the trust of one or two of the more senior members of the team). You say that you're confident that their approach to the project is flawed. That doesn't matter as far as your short term goal is concerned. Instead, try to offer your help to deal with immediate problems they're facing. ...


7

Have a talk with your own manager. Explain what you've learned about their technical problem. Explain what solution they're currently pursuing. Explain what solution you have in mind. Tell him that the impression you get is that they're not open to different solutions than they're currently pursuing. Now ask your manager how to proceed. His job as a ...


7

First of all, make sure you are approaching them in a official capacity, not just as a colleague-met-next-to-watercooler person. Couple of steps, when you are working as an adviser for a team which is not directly being managed by your superior: Ensue your manager and the manager of other team is aware of your involvement. Document everything, all ...


0

And what should I say when they ask about my current offers from university (as it is expected any good student will have offers). Its unlikely they will ask. I've seen it a few times, but its really not that common. There's no good reason for them to care about offers unless they are trying to take advantage of you divulging too much information to lowball ...


2

It seems that your company had big plans for the future, but then immediate concerns came and stole the show. This isn't all that unusual in corporate reality. You mention that the e-commerce project has moved forward a bit, but not nearly as much as you'd expected. What's the holdup? Is it money - are the company's financial reserves tied up in something ...


8

You asked, Can you help me interpret this situation better? Should I take any actions? It's hard for us to direct your actions, since they will depend on your personal goals and motivations. However, we can provide advice on a framework to help you proceed. It sounds like the crux of the matter is that you expected to work on a specific project, and ...


1

Continue interviewing. If company B makes you an offer and you decide to take it, let company A and your university know as soon as possible. Until that time, however, do not divulge the fact that you're interviewing to anyone who does not strictly need to know. If asked by your university, dodge the question by pointing to your offer from company A. If ...


3

We can´t tell you what to do. First make up your mind where you ultimately want to be. Startup can be quite exciting, but can also be a hell to work in an with no experience... you will probably be expected to do get things done with little supervision. If you want to stay at A, tell B you have singed a contract elsewhere. Tell them you are sorry but the ...


0

If you don't like your doctoral program, don't waste any more time at it. Please keep this in mind: universities are churning out far too many PhDs for the number of available teaching and research jobs. If getting through your doctorate is going to be a struggle for you, so will finding a job afterward. As far as self-respect goes in the programming ...


3

The question to ask yourself is what do you want to get hired for? There will be company's that will be, for want of a better word, starstruck seeing an impressive name on the CV and will let that unduly influence the hiring process. Even without that there is some kudos to having an impressive name on the resume. However a more savvy hiring manager will ...


1

Far from a complete answer, but generally speaking if your goal is to work at a large multinational company in R&D, then the hardest part(s) will be: Getting a work visa for the country you want to move to. Getting a job in that country. Getting a job in your field/discipline. Once you have those 3, getting a job at a different employer is not so ...


11

Take the opportunities you have in front of you when they are there to be taken. You never know when another will come along. As for the decision between small and interesting, and big and pedestrian, I would choose the interesting. While there is some currency in saying "I interned for big multi-national", you're almost certainly going to be asked "and ...


0

Tongue in cheek answer - the company is fully aware that on it's own it will create problems. Matthew Gaiser asnwer is exactly about that. Company knows that their employees create, sometimes critical, tools for them. That some positions have bus factor of 1. That people have no time to create documentations and/or even think about backup plan, let alone ...


0

"Proven problem-solving ability" has become just another HR buzzword to put on wanted ads, like "Ninja", "Shark", "Rockstar" or, for the more technically inclined "Distributed", "Machine learning", "AI"... you get where I'm going with this, right? As others have noted, problem-solving skills have been part of human nature, and animals too, since... ever, ...


4

The nature of middle class work is changing. Millions of jobs used to involve repetitive, "by the rules", processing of papers or operation of equipment. Much of that work has been, or is in the process, of being be automated by computer systems or robots. Such jobs still exist but will tend to pay very poorly. If you want to make more than minimum wage you ...


7

Problem solving skills have always been valued, but here is a reason they are growing in significance: Turnover and lack of training People used to join one company and remain for life. They would learn from the other lifers who were just a bit older. Companies had formal training programs which helped people understand how things were set up. Now, ...


1

As an unhappy PhD student in their fourth year, I highly recommend quitting if you already lost motivation after three months. Since you prefer to hear advice on the how rather than the what, let me cast my reasons as to why in that form. That is, how should you make this decision: Consider the short term future, e.g. the next four years. Do you enjoy ...


1

When this happens on the phone, and someone calls you "Miss" or "Mrs." your reaction shouldn't be "please address me as..." but "I am ...". You are Mr. Dhammika. You don't want to be addressed in some special way, you want to be addressed in the correct way, according to who you are. So if someone guesses incorrectly that you are female based on your voice,...


0

You are clear about this: you need more pay. There's nothing wrong with needing more pay. Here's a question to ask your supervisor. Hey, boss, what does it take for me to get more responsibility in my job? Most companies appreciate people who want more responsibility, so this question is unlikely to give offense. If the question does offend your ...


0

Another thing to try could be to explain Hi ... btw. I know some people think I a woman when on the phone but I am male, just to add... That's an interesting option in situations like a first business call where you want to avoid expecting upcoming embarrassing situations for both of you.


2

"Better"? What do you mean by "Better?" From your question, I'm going to assume you just mean "Higher Salary". I mean, that's literally the only thing you mention about your job - nothing about benefits, corporate culture, personal happiness, technologies that you use, etc. Right off the bat, this makes you look incredibly myopic - especially for someone ...


3

Why do you need to correct them? I have the same problem--my phone voice sounds female enough that I will generally be assumed to be female even when they don't know my name (I have the male spelling, the female Lauren is far more common.) Unless there's some reason they need to know my gender I just let it be. It's not worth trying to correct people.


7

Getting to the gist of the question: What is the better career strategy? Stay at one company long term or switch often to get higher pay. There is no one strategy to rule them all. It really depends on your end goal. If you want a higher salary, generally switching jobs laterally is your best bet. Companies tend to offer new hires higher salaries to ...


28

I'm trans so I have special experience here, I guess... Whenever I get misgendered I have three options: 1) Say nothing. 2) Immediately correct them. 3) Correct them if they continue to do it. You have to figure out how much it bothers you. Usually if I'm say... talking to a vendor that I'll never speak with again, I just ignore it. It's not worth the ...


6

I'm assuming here that these are one-time failures by people you don't know to correctly identify you, and not coworkers calling you incorrectly on a repeated basis or with intentional rudeness. For one-off mistakes, an immediate, quick, but casual correction is usually effective. Try not to dwell on it, and if the caller apologizes, make your response ...


50

Most of the time, the nicest way is to be straightforward. If this happens in middle of a running conversation, just say: Excuse me if you got confused by the tone of the voice, but I'm Mr. X here, not miss X. Another way, lead the conversation by saying: "Hello, Mr.X here / speaking" include the salutation on purpose so as to leave no room for ...


20

That’s not what you want to say. You want to tell them that you would be happy to accept their offer but can’t at the moment because of the bond. The new company may decide to do something to get you released earlier if they want to, so your problem goes away. Or they may hold on that information and contact you in a year. If you say you’re comfortable ...


1

I don't think there is anything wrong with your rejection as you have currently phrased it. I often get offers and reply in a similar way: [Thanks for your interest/Thanks for reaching out], but I'm not looking for a new position at this time. I'll be sure to reach out to you if anything changes. I have never had anyone take that badly


1

Just say "No, I am comfortable with my company and in future when I want to change then I will inform you" in a little more polished version "Thanks for the offer, but right now I'm not looking for a change. I'll get back to you if I change my mind."


0

I will just state my personal experience here, as a software developer who have been in this exact same situation. Hope this helps! I already had job offers, but as a tech worker, you'll probably be hunted just as I am, so I won't worry about that. I had precise reasons to leave. In my case I wanted to work with a specific set of technologies, so that I ...


0

You'll find all sorts of sources for how many people accept counteroffers and then still leave within a year, and they tend to suggest that between 60 and 90% of people who accept a counter offer still leave within the year. With that in mind, I tend to think that a counter offer needs to be: Clear on exactly what it's offering - no vague terms, definite ...


6

I’m adding a separate answer because most of the answers are speaking to normal negotiation situations and not yours. From your posts, you’re willing and able to be jobless vs. do a job you don’t want to do. So it seems this isn’t about this company paying you more now or possessing leverage over them. Similarly, the usual points about them wanting to ...


4

I am reading your other question and I believe you currently do not have a job lined up. So your hypothetical pay bump is only that, an assumption that may not materialize anytime soon. I think you should not have quit and instead stayed on board without having said anything at all. During this time you look for a job that lines up with what you expect. ...


21

Other answers are generally correct in the advice of getting any promises in writing, but are glossing over a really important fact for your situation: You resigned without having another job lined up. That really puts you in a tough situation that is going to be difficult to remedy. While you can't trust any promise of a raise or more responsibility by ...


15

Diplomacy frequently consists in soothingly saying, “Nice doggie,” until you have a chance to pick up a rock. —Walter Trumball. Right now, they're saying "nice doggy". As soon as you agree, they'll look for that rock. Every last career adviser, myself included, will warn you about accepting a counter offer. The simple reason is that you have proven that ...


0

If you have an offer from another company... You don’t owe him an analysis...you can give him one but it’s voluntary at this point. Sounds like he’s giving you more responsibility but I haven’t seen any indicator of a pay bump. What’s the end goal of talking to the CTO? At the end of the day, you have promises coming in from your current and your next ...


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