New answers tagged

0

Since it's about the workplace I'll answer in the perspective of the Workplace and career. Technologies and framework always change in our domain. If you touch different technologies, you will get to the new one easier, that's how it will be perceived in the future. Furthermore the technologies you quote are quite common (Js, Ts, C#) some experience in it ...


-1

Your post was way too long so I skipped to the end. Especially from your age, take the SysAdmin job. I'm 29 & 5 years into my career, and dude there's so much money to be had in our line of work for good people. That means so much more than just being able to code. You're paid in direct proportion to the difficulty of problem you solve, and coding only ...


1

You have to go with your gut. It’s a great labor market and those come and go. You sound bright talented and hard working. One advantage to the current company is that you have a great relationship with the boss. You can learn a lot about IT and life. Yes you have some growing up to do still. The disadvantage of the current company is who will be ...


6

I cannot tell you which choice to make, but I can give you pertinent insight. The clearance doesn't just "look good on your resume". It makes you worth more money. Jobs that require clearances pay more. The solution to contracts running out, if you go that route, is to keep six months in the bank. You assume that you will get laid off, and you use that ...


1

You know the name of the company, you can research some of the projects they may have worked on, and see how those projects align with your interests and capabilities. They are not likely to care about any theory that you have accumulated over the years, they want to understand how hiring you can give them a practical benefit with their projects.


0

If you want to support her in her change, but need her right now as a full time developer, there are multiple compromise options: Support her to train in her spare time, potentially providing financial support for courses and the like You can also offer to reduce her hours for a month or two so she has more spare time Give it a thought, perhaps it is ...


1

There are good points in the other answers, but I feel they do not press enough on what matters. Hopefully, it is not too late :) she insists that she would like to develop skills in areas outside of programming That is perfectly healthy behavior. Many people (I am one of them) like to diversify their work. Another many people (again, I am one of them) ...


6

A hard truth to accept is, employers are paying you because you complete work for them. They're not paying you to be stretched, or to develop you. While many employers try very hard to support employee development, the primary reason they pay you, as an employee, is to do the work that they choose to assign to you. If you find that work unacceptable, you ...


1

The work will be there tomorrow. Leave every work day at a normal time. It's a pretty messed-up world we live in with this pressure we live with to put in more hours. For what? So we can get an atta-boy or a t-shirt? I'm sorry but do the job you were paid to do and nothing more. If ladder-climbing is your goal then have at it. Otherwise you can easily go ...


1

IMHO, imposter syndrome is not fitting for what you're experiencing since you do have shortcomings when it comes to your work such as not knowing test driven development. From your post, it's also not reasonably inferable that you're co-worker think less of you. I was in a similar situation when I was hired for a development job based on my good grades ...


1

While having some technical background helps some, at the end of the day, your code on your pull request will be the only thing that matters if your pull request will be approved or not... your career background will be irrelevant as a pull request approval criteria. You’ve got bigger problems if its the other way around. I’ve seen horrible code from guys ...


15

I'm one of many, many people who develop software without an academic background in it.  (I got a GCSE in Computer Science, but didn't study it at A-Level — sorry, I don't know what the equivalent of those would be in other countries — and my degree was in Mathematics.)  But I've been working in IT for two-and-a-half decades now, and still seem to be getting ...


2

How did you managed to get rid of imposter syndrome? Don't do this. Instead of worrying and feeling unadequate because of the "impostor syndrome", don't put yourself down. Don't beat yourself up and belittle yourself and your achievements because of the "impostor syndrome". You should not feel bad, discouraged, or intimidated. Instead, use the "impostor ...


2

All of the people worked on my company came from an IT background. This really gets me as I was the only one who is not. As someone who has been a Systems Administrator for over 10 years now, (working at a few different software development companies), I'd say that your definition of an IT background is too broad. Most of the programmers that I've worked ...


4

I got hired because I have an app and a portfolio to show. Always remember this. The company wouldn't have hired you if it didn't see any promise in you. When I started I can't shake this overwhelming feeling that I don't belong to my job. That will go away with time, as you settle into your new role. But I was not doing any TDD or any unit testing. ...


1

Congratulations! You're an adult human being! That might sound flippant, but the problems you described are common to people with decades of experience and sizable bodies of work. I attended an in-state university in a town with a better reputation as a "party town" than a "center of serious learning." I also worked my way through college, including doing ...


3

The first thing is that regardless of the root cause -- underlying health issue, or stress-induced health problem -- something has to give. I'm going to ignore root causes and focus solely on how to regain control over your work load and associated stress. One of the first things you need to learn about "work" is that if you don't tell your boss you're ...


5

Ultimately, you need two things. One is programming ability. If you did not have that to a really impressive extent, you would not have been able to produce a portfolio that would convince your employer to hire you. That is an achievement worthy of pride. The other is background knowledge. Programming is sufficiently complicated that there is literally more ...


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Congratulations on been selected for the job! You got hired because, you showed results of what you are capable of. Don't pretend to know things you don't. Be aware: others are also fighting imposter syndrome. You are not alone. This industry continually evolves. Everyone has to keep learning, or they fall behind. There will always be someone who knows ...


6

You have an app and a portfolio to show. You can write software. That means you are far ahead of many people applying to jobs, and ahead of quite a few people who get jobs. "Fresh out of college" isn't exactly an "exceptional background". "An app and a portfolio to show" is a much better background. I have seen a small number of developers who came fresh ...


4

There is a solution to these concerns: work hard and prove you are deserving to be there and deserve their professional respect. As far as a non-IT background (prior professional experience an/or post secondary education), only elitist people care and this is their problem, not yours. What you are capable of doing is far more important. Two of the best ...


-2

thyroid deficiency and adrenal fatigue, look it up and go see a doctor. normal is a permanent load of 40-50 hours without even taking vacations, with vacations you should be able to maintain these hours for years. if you have trouble already now, there is maybe a medical reason. only after you have eliminated possible causes you should start looking into ...


6

Question: How many hour a week do you work (either paid or unpaid)? 40 hours a week should be maintainable. Anything above that you need to cut it down. Since you are thinking about changing jobs or just having a break, which means your boss loses you 100%, you can go to your boss and say "the working hours that I do are too much. I'll cut it down to 40 ...


1

You basically have three options. Tell the new company that you are not available until the date you mentioned. (I'd start with this regardless, as they might facilitate you) Break the contact with the current employer, and just join the new company. Don't leave your current employer. There are usually provisions for the second option in your contract - ...


0

You can also check out customer feedback for the resume writing company at the Better Business Bureau (https://www.bbb.org/). Unaddressed negative reviews would be a red flag.


2

This is a tough situation to be in. What I have heard from recruiters (and the experiences of friends and relatives has confirmed this) is that in the IT world any employment gap of longer than two months in your resume will cause prospective employers to shuffle you to the back of the pile. A six month gap sends you straight to the "round file". I've ...


1

If you are in the U.S., PMI certification is considered the gold standard for project management positions. If you choose option 1, I strongly encourage you to pursue PMI certification. If you do not have PMI certification, and you are competing with other applicants who do, it is very unlikely that you will be the most competitive application unless there ...


0

Depending on where you are looking some companies have dedicated routes for those in their 40s to jumpstart their career. While I am not in your position, I am in the field and 10 months out can lead to you become somewhat behind with the trends. Many positions for part 1 would expect you to have the skills you outline in point 2, therefore if you are ...


2

You can obviously get back to the 2. point, the thing is that you have to be able to show demonstred skills as a developer, no matter your experience (another problem can be that companies will consider a junior position only for fresh grades = lower salary, even if you are not asking for a high salary you might fall out of consideration). What I suggest ...


3

I am from India. I was in your situation 5 years back. BTW, Thanks for taking me back to 2014. I was so young, happy, single, etc etccc. So many blissful memories. My new company asked me to join in 30 days but the notice period of the service company I worked for was 90 heck days. I couldnt join the new compnay or accept the offer. I got another offer from ...


10

Most of these answers suggest "Don't join the company" simply because they are asking you to join in 45 days. Sad reality of India is that every company wants you to join immediately as even the recruiters have SLAs. So, this "can you join early" message is something every HR will ask. I have been asked "can you join on coming Monday" so many times. I got an ...


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From the edit/update: I received the call letter with the date of Joining as 15th October. And today is 27th August and if i resign > today in my company i will be free by 27th October. Shall i ask then > to increase a date of 13 more days on the deadline. Shall i ask a > written document for that or email conversation is ok? Here is the real heart of ...


77

Being in India (but Europe would be the same in that respect), if you have 60 days notice period, the company can force you to work for 60 days for them and not work for any other company for those 60 days. You could of course offer a shorter notice period and it might be accepted, but if it is not accepted, there is nothing you can do. I know that. You ...


33

Doesn't matter in which part of the world you maybe, Always, always always make it clear to your future perspective employers how long your current notice period is before you start interviewing with them. Kind of agree with what Chris says, no business is going to get lost in 15 days unless it's NASA and you have to pack yourself in an Astronaut Suit, fly ...


2

From a US standpoint, this is all very strange and this semi-collusion between companies would be in the realm of potentially illegal. It almost reads as though they buy and sell you with each others’ permission being required. Please do factor in that I do not know the legalities and customs of Indian employment. If all parties are legitimate and ...


202

Please note that this answer is based on the original post and comments, which described a completely different context than after the edits. The original question was mainly based on a misunderstanding by the OP. Someone has to say it.. Do not join the new company! You didn't even start and they are already blackmailing you! It's completely unreasonable ...


1

This is somewhat of a catch-22 situation and I don't think there is one great answer. I didn't notice your location – you said about your current company if they don't release me in 45 days which implies your area doesn't have at-will employment laws. If that is the case your only hope is to lean on the side that is more likely to give in to your ...


3

Well, if there is a verbal agreement and if you act like you have accepted the new role: riding your car, do the learning, receive the training, etc. then you have accepted your new role. The people in your company have the right to believe they have a new team lead. When withdrawing they will be disappointed. It depends on how resentful the people at your ...


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