254

I spent a lot of time refactoring and trying to remove technical debt. I received a verbal warning for under-performing before going on holidays. It seems here you were working on something that wasn't asked for. This is generally very bad, and can lead to termination. If you think the project needs refactoring, and I trust you that it did, you must sell it ...


226

Today I was fired from a software company.. for the 3rd time in 1.5 years. Needless to say I feel like I reached bottom and it's impossible to get out without changing career. Should I change a career? Is it even possible to find a job now? Yup, that's pretty bad. But remember that you weren't sure anyone would hire you after being fired before - yet ...


163

Understand why you're getting fired You've said it yourself. You're focusing on rewriting, when that isn't what you're there to do. You have a really bad case of Not Invented Here syndrome. As far as management goes, the problem seems to be about whether you're prepared to do what your manager tells you and get your work done, or whether you're going to ...


39

Basically, you've gotten yourself stuck where you don't want to be because you've been worrying about what other people expect of you. It's time to stop doing what other people tell you too, and to start the career path that you want to follow and be happy. Now, you have three years experience as a developer - it might not be the tech stack you want, and ...


31

I have a tendency to cleanup messy code, refactor and ensure things are well tested - something that can be seen by many as slow performing. I'm going to go out on a limb and assume this is more than the usual boy scouting. So: I have a tendency to choose to cleanup messy code, refactor and ensure things are well tested, whenever they are "adjacent" to ...


29

This is a variant of the "portfolio of projects" idea. Look for a popular, widely used, open software project in C or C++ that relates to one of his areas of domain knowledge. He should join the project and start contributing to both discussions and actual development. At the best, someone needing a developer in that area will pick him out for maturity of ...


29

From 2nd part of your question I figure you're switching to another IT field. I would say that this totally counts as staying in the business, even if this isn't iOS anymore. So from this perspective: No. Changing technologies won't kill your career, in my opinion - quite the opposite. Even if you would be interested in offer that isn't IT related - you ...


27

I suggest that you wrote down your cook experience and emphasize what you learn that you can use in your next position. We hired some candidates as a Junior Developer in past companies where I work that they were Cook for multiples years. They emphasize in their resume that they learn soft skills like team communication, planning, etc. because they are ...


24

Since every payday is an adventure: when will we get paid, and how much will each installment be; starting to look is a good idea. You are gambling that they will tell you "oops no more money", and then everybody is out of a job. While you do have a year plus in savings, it is still better to not have to be spending your savings on day one of the job search....


23

Ouch You don't need me to tell you that this isn't good so I'm not going to belabour the point but it's worth a quick look at the three firings: Case 1: Fired from a fintech company on the 2nd month for not performing. This was correct since I had a lack of motivation. Nothing to say here - you know you messed up. Something tells me that lack of ...


22

It is an unsure environment. That's a pretty good reason right there. You can discuss your desire to move into a more established business with more stability. However, don't stop there. A better answer is to use that as a way to start talking about the accomplishments you've had while being a business owner. Some or all of things you've done. As a ...


22

I had no problems getting interviews (and job offers) as a junior dev with little experience at age 46 (in the US), but my undergrad degree is in a related field and I had started studying for my MS in CS. I'll echo the "portfolio of projects" recommendation, which should be listed on the resume. Also, don't lie on the resume but don't highlight the age. ...


22

Simple. You find a new job, sign the contract, then you give notice. No explanation needed. No advance warning needed, that’s what a notice period is there for. Telling your company any earlier can have substantial negative consequences for you.


22

I have wasted 3 starting years of my career. Is there any way to start over? You have not lost any years, you learned many things. Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years provides a mind-provoking insight. You should also read Bullshit jobs, it is mind provoking and covers quite well software development jobs, since most software projects (more than half of ...


21

I would make sure that any new resume you send out (and do not use that consulting company again) is correct with your real experience. In general when people check backgrounds, they care about whether you were employed by who you said on their application you were employed by, doing the job you said you did, during the days you said you were there. They ...


21

Right now, you should follow the advice in all the other "I'm on a PIP" questions and apply for other jobs immediately. Go get out before you get fired. A PIP is not meant to be helpful for you, it's meant to be helpful for the company in it's attempt to fire you. Take action. Now. what do I do next? As for what you should do in the future, let me say ...


21

It sounds to me like many devs who are "Java developers" and do not want to learn python because you can do everything with Java... The way I see it, is that you have a good opportunity here! How many people have a good knowledge of AWS and Azure? Also what I have learn over the years is that knowing several technologies almost always plays to your ...


19

A lot of learning is done on the job, to be sure. But accept that we all have to invest some amount of our non-working hours in keeping up to date and learning new technologies. You say you want to learn Ruby, what's stopping you? Just download it and start building something, anything. That's how you start learning. Then when you're comfortable enough with ...


18

I have a friend who is now 57. He joined a company when he graduated from university and never worked anywhere else. Now the company is shutting down. He's been there over 30 years. Some people are holding that against him, a little, because he doesn't know how things are done in other companies, doesn't have a wide range of experiences. So I'm not going to ...


18

I realise there are already 16 answers here, many of them excellent, but they don't seem to have addressed that there is a small possibility that there could be other reasons for being fired. It might just be that these have been convenient excuses for your firing. It is never nice to point this out, but it's worth examining if you are fitting in on a ...


17

If possible, stick it out until your performance review. The learning curve in software engineering (even for recent college graduates) is very steep, and it is possible that you are not be as bad as you may think. It is also possible that you are comparing yourself with abnormally talented people and suffering by comparison. The performance review will ...


16

When I look at a resume and I see for example "from 2008-2010 worked as a PHP developer, from 2010-2012 worked as a Java developer" I read that as 4 years of software development experience with a background in Java and PHP. Of course your ability to code in a language you use every day will be greater than your ability to code in a language you haven't ...


15

No, getting another skill in your resume is not bad. It never is. Testing is an important part of the software development process and even as a programmer, you will be helped by knowing these skills. If it turns out you're stuck as a tester for a long period when you really want to program, then you should talk to your boss. If you both agree that this is ...


15

Don't say anything. Because, a) the raise is not a "thank you for all the hard work you'll be doing next year". You earned the raise already. And b) the offer could fall through exactly. Until you know you have another job, continue everything of your previous one like before. Working, getting raises, etc.etc. And to start with, what will your ...


15

By your own account, you've had 6 jobs in 8 years and you "have a hard time understanding large legacy codebases." Each job switch brings its own stresses: new rules to learn, new pecking order and new legacy code base. I recommend first staying at one job longer. Even the ugliest code base should start to make sense after a while or you'll have more ...


14

Is going to a small company from a large one where it really couldn't get any better (to some people) a black mark on resumes at all? When I interview candidates, there are some large companies that get my attention. On the other hand, I know a lot of the small startups in the domain in which I work, and they get my attention as well. For me, there is no ...


14

Your resume is your sales brochure. While you shouldn't tell any untruths, there is no need for it to give every piece of information you have. If you don't think listing something you did would help you, then don't put it on. If that leaves a gap in your employment record, you are going to have to account for that at some stage. A thorough recruiter will ...


13

The same answer as any interview question: use it as an opportunity to show how you can help the employer and the value you can bring. For example: "I used to love working in the hospital because insert reasons here, but have since discovered I found a passion in the insurance field, and can use the skills I have gained in the hospital to help your ...


13

In the current job market, is an entry-level software dev job the best I can hope for? Probably. Does my 7 years of self-taught experience before I got the CS degree count for anything? Probably. The fact of the matter is that hiring managers don't care about years of experience - HR people care about years of experience. And HR people are the ones who ...


13

When changing careers, should I address my lack of experience in the new field in my cover letter? No. Your cover letter is a selling device. It should be enthusiastic and highlight your ability to excel in the job you are seeking. You should not call attention to your lack of experience in this letter. In your example, portions of each of your bolded ...


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