6

I cannot tell you which choice to make, but I can give you pertinent insight. The clearance doesn't just "look good on your resume". It makes you worth more money. Jobs that require clearances pay more. The solution to contracts running out, if you go that route, is to keep six months in the bank. You assume that you will get laid off, and you use that ...


2

You can obviously get back to the 2. point, the thing is that you have to be able to show demonstred skills as a developer, no matter your experience (another problem can be that companies will consider a junior position only for fresh grades = lower salary, even if you are not asking for a high salary you might fall out of consideration). What I suggest ...


2

This is a tough situation to be in. What I have heard from recruiters (and the experiences of friends and relatives has confirmed this) is that in the IT world any employment gap of longer than two months in your resume will cause prospective employers to shuffle you to the back of the pile. A six month gap sends you straight to the "round file". I've ...


1

You have to go with your gut. It’s a great labor market and those come and go. You sound bright talented and hard working. One advantage to the current company is that you have a great relationship with the boss. You can learn a lot about IT and life. Yes you have some growing up to do still. The disadvantage of the current company is who will be ...


1

You know the name of the company, you can research some of the projects they may have worked on, and see how those projects align with your interests and capabilities. They are not likely to care about any theory that you have accumulated over the years, they want to understand how hiring you can give them a practical benefit with their projects.


1

Software developers are sought after, so if you know your craft you should be able to find a job. Is having your own software acceptable to being hired as a programmer? Yes, but in my experience only the recruiter will care. The technical interviewers will find out whether you are experienced or not. Are the "complementary studies in IT" a better ...


1

Any experience is beneficial. We've recruited several people with no experience at all in IT. Attitude is everything. Algorithms and programming style are transferable from game programming so I don't see this as being an issue. If anything, it is a plus. You're going to more inclined to add polish and go the extra mile if your heart is in something rather ...


1

If you are in the U.S., PMI certification is considered the gold standard for project management positions. If you choose option 1, I strongly encourage you to pursue PMI certification. If you do not have PMI certification, and you are competing with other applicants who do, it is very unlikely that you will be the most competitive application unless there ...


1

There are good points in the other answers, but I feel they do not press enough on what matters. Hopefully, it is not too late :) she insists that she would like to develop skills in areas outside of programming That is perfectly healthy behavior. Many people (I am one of them) like to diversify their work. Another many people (again, I am one of them) ...


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